The Presidential Dollar

On December 22, 2005, an Act was signed by then-President George W. Bush to honor the special individuals who were seated as Presidents of the United States of America. The Act was called the Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-145) where portraits of the eligible presidents will be featured on a Gold-colored Dollar Coin.

Four brand new dollar coins will be minted every year where the name of the featured president, the number or order of Presidency, years of terms as a US President and the motto IN GOD WE TRUST will be indicated on the obverse. The designer of the obverse varies.

As for the reverse, Don Everhart was the designer who was also a US Mint Sculptor and Engraver. A large Statue of Liberty is featured to create a dramatic impression. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the denomination $1 are also included in the design of the reverse.

The Presidential dollars were made to have edge-incused inscriptions so as to make more room on each side of the coin. It allows the coin to have a more dramatic as well as a much larger sized artwork. The inscriptions that can be found on the edges are E PLURIBUS UNUM, the respective mintmark and the year when the coin was issued or minted. During the first two years of issuance (2007-2008), the Presidential Dollars also had the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on the edge. It was only in 2008 that the said motto was transferred on the obverse.

The Presidential Dollars were composed of 88.5% Copper, 6% Zinc, 3.5% Manganese and 2% Nickel – the same composition for Native American $1 coins and the Sacagawea Dollar. These have lettered edges, weighs approximately 8.10 grams and are 26.50 millimeters in diameter. The US Mints in Philadelphia and Denver produces the currency strikes while the San Francisco Mint produces Proof coins meant for coin collectors.  

The Presidential $1 Coin Program started in 2007 with Presidents George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and the last issue were of Presidents Richard M. Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Ronald Reagan. Under the provision of the Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005, a President may only be featured on the Presidential Coin if they have already been deceased for at least two years.

The Presidential $1 Coins Release Dates and Featured Presidents

2007

  • George Washington
  • John Adams
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • James Madison

2008

  • James Monroe
  • John Quincy Adams
  • Andrew Jackson
  • Martin Van Buren

2009

  • William Henry Harrison
  • John Tyler
  • James K. Polk
  • Zachary Taylor

2010

  • Millard Fillmore
  • Franklin Pierce
  • James Buchanan
  • Abraham Lincoln

2011

  • Andrew Johnson
  • Ulysses S. Grant
  • Rutherford B. Hayes
  • James Garfield

2012

  • Chester A. Arthur
  • Grover Cleveland (1st term)
  • Benjamin Harrison
  • Grover Cleveland (2nd term)

2013

  • William McKinley
  • Theodore Roosevelt
  • William Howard Taft
  • Woodrow Wilson

2014

  • Warren G. Harding
  • Calvin Coolidge
  • Herbert Hoover
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt

2015

  • Harry S. Truman
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • John F. Kennedy
  • Lyndon B. Johnson

2016

  • Richard M. Nixon
  • Gerald Ford
  • Ronald Reagan

The Presidential $1 Coin Releases, Mintages, Mintmark, Year and Varieties

George Washington Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar George Washington, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the very first Presidential Dollar ever minted and first issued in 2007. The coin features a portrait of President George Washington, his name on top of his portrait, 1st PRESIDENT and 1789-1797 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna while Don Everhart designed the reverse. The George Washington Presidential Dollar has the highest mintage of over 300 million pieces.

However, since the last time the US Mint has minted coins with edge-incused inscriptions, some were mistakenly issued without the lettering on the edges. Coin collectors learned of this and eagerly flocked banks to get ahold of the rare error coin.

Regular Strike

2007-P George Washington –

2007-P George Washington – Position A

2007-P George Washington – Position B

2007-D George Washington

2007-D George Washington – Position A

2007-D George Washington – Position B

(2007) George Washington, Missing Edge Lettering

Proofs

2007-S George Washington – minted in San Francisco

Special Strikes

2007-P George Washington – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-P George Washington – Position B, Satin Finish

2007-D George Washington – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-D George Washington – Position B, Satin Finish

(2007) George Washington – Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

John Adams Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar John Adams, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 2nd Presidential Dollar minted and the 2nd one issued in 2007. The coin features a portrait of President John Adams, his name on top of his portrait, 2nd PRESIDENT and 1797-1801 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Charles L. Vickers and designed by Joel Iskowitz while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 200 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2007-P John Adams – Position A

2007-P John Adams – Position B

2007-P John Adams – Doubled Edge Lettering, Overlapped

2007-P First Day of Issue

2007-D Dbld Edge Let.-Overlap

2007-P John Adams – Doubled Edge Lettering, Inverted

2007-P John Adams-Doubled Edge Let.-Inverted, First Day of Issue

(2007) John Adams – Missing Edge Lettering

(2007) First Day of Issue

2007-D John Adams – Position A

2007-D John Adams – Position B

Proofs

2007-S John Adams

Special Strikes

2007-P John Adams – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-P John Adams – Position B, Satin Finish

2007-D John Adams – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-D John Adams – Position B, Satin Finish

Thomas Jefferson Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Thomas Jefferson, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 3rd Presidential Dollar minted and the third one issued in 2007. The coin features a portrait of President Thomas Jefferson, his name on top of his portrait, 3rd PRESIDENT and 1801-1809 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 200 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2007-P Thomas Jefferson – Position A

2007-P Thomas Jefferson – Position B

2007-D Thomas Jefferson – Position A

2007-D Thomas Jefferson – Position B

(2007) Thomas Jefferson-Missing Edge Lettering

2007-D Thomas Jefferson-Doubled Edge Lettering, Inverted

2007-P Thomas Jefferson-Doubled Edge Lettering. Overlapped

Proofs

2007-S Thomas Jefferson

Special Strikes

2007-P Thomas Jefferson – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-P Thomas Jefferson – Position B, Satin Finish

2007-D Thomas Jefferson – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-D Thomas Jefferson – Position B, Satin Finish

(2007) Thomas Jefferson-Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

James Madison Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar James Madison , Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 4th Presidential Dollar minted the last one issued in 2007. The coin features a portrait of President James Madison, his name on top of his portrait, 4th PRESIDENT and 1809-1817 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Don Everhart and designed by Joel Iskowitz while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 170 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2007-P James Madison – Position A

2007-P James Madison – Position B

2007-D James Madison – Position A

(2007) James Madison – Missing Edge Lettering

2007-D James Madison – Position B

2007-D James Madison, Doubled Edge Lettering-Inverted

2007-D Dbld Edge Let. – Overlap

Proofs

2007-S James Madison

Special Strikes

2007-P James Madison – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-P James Madison – Position B, Satin Finish

(2007) James Madison – Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2007-D James Madison – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-D James Madison – Position B, Satin Finish

James Monroe Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar James Monroe , Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 5th Presidential Dollar and the first one minted in 2008. The coin features a portrait of President James Monroe, his name on top of his portrait, 5th PRESIDENT and 1817-1825 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 124 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2008-P James Monroe – Position A

2008-D James Monroe – Position A

2008-P James Monroe – Position B

2008-D James Monroe – Position B

(2008) Missing Edge Lettering James Monroe

2008-P James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Overlapped

2008-D James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Overlapped

2008-P James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Inverted

2008-D James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Inverted

2008-P James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Overlapped-1st Day of Issue

2008-D James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Overlapped-1st Day of Issue

2008-P James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Inverted-1st Day of Issue

2008-D James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Inverted-1st Day of Issue

Proofs

2008-S James Monroe

Special Strikes

(2008) James Monroe, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2008-P James Monroe -Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P James Monroe Satin

2008-D James Monroe – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P James Monroe – Position B, Satin Finish

2008-D James Monroe – Position B, Satin Finish

John Quincy Adams Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar John Quincy Adams, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 6th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one minted in 2008. The coin features a portrait of President John Quincy Adams, his name on top of his portrait and 6th PRESIDENT and 1825-1829 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 115 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2008-P John Quincy Adams – Position A

2008-D John Quincy Adams – Position B

2008-P John Quincy Adams – Position B

2008-D John Quincy Adams – Position B

Proofs

2008-S John Quincy Adams

Special Strikes

2008-P John Quincy Adams – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-D John Quincy Adams – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P John Quincy Adams – Position B, Satin Finish

2008-D John Quincy Adams – Position B, Satin Finish

(2008) John Quincy Adams – Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

Andrew Jackson Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Andrew Jackson, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 7th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2008. The coin features a portrait of President Andrew Jackson, his name on top of his portrait, 7th PRESIDENT and 1829-1837 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Jim Licaretz and designed by Joel Iskowitz while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 122 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2008-P Andrew Jackson – Position A

2008-D Andrew Jackson – Position A

2008-P Andrew Jackson – Position B

2008-D Andrew Jackson – Position B

(2008) Andrew Jackson, Missing Edge Lettering

Proofs

2008-S Andrew Jackson

Special Strikes

(2008) Andrew Jackson, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2008-P Andrew Jackson – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-D Andrew Jackson – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P Andrew Jackson – Position B, Satin Finish

2008-D Andrew Jackson – Position B, Satin Finish

Martin Van Buren Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Martin Van Buren, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 8th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2008. The coin features a portrait of President Martin Van Buren, his name on top of his portrait, 8th PRESIDENT and 1837-1841 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Phebe Hemphill and designed by Joel Iskowitz while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 100 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2008-P Martin Van Buren – Position A

2008-D Martin Van Buren – Position A

2008-P Martin Van Buren – Position B

2008-D Martin Van Buren – Position B

Proofs

2008-S Martin Van Buren

Special Strikes

(2008) Martin Van Buren, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2008-P Martin Van Buren – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-D Martin Van Buren – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P Martin Van Buren – Position B, Satin Finish

2008-D Martin Van Buren – Position B, Satin Finish

William Henry Harrison Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar William Henry Harrison, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 9th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2009. The coin features a portrait of President William Henry Harrison, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 9th PRESIDENT and 1841 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna while Don Everhart designed the reverse. Less than 100 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2009-P William Henry Harrison – Position A

2009-D William Henry Harrison – Position A

2009-P William Henry Harrison – Position B

2009-D William Henry Harrison – Position B

Proofs

2009-S William Henry Harrison

Special Strikes

2009-P William Henry Harrison – Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D William Henry Harrison – Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P William Henry Harrison – Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D William Henry Harrison – Position B, Satin Finish

(2009) William Henry Harrison, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

John Tyler Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar John Tyler, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 10th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2009. The coin features a portrait of President John Tyler, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 10th PRESIDENT and 1841-1845 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 80 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2009-P John Tyler – Position A

2009-D John Tyler – Position A

2009-P John Tyler – Position B

2009-D John Tyler – Position B

Proofs

2009-S John Tyler

Special Strikes

2009-P John Tyler – Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D John Tyler – Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P John Tyler – Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D John Tyler – Position B, Satin Finish

(2009) John Tyler, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

James K. Polk Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar James Polk, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 11th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2009. The coin features a portrait of President James K. Polk, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 11th PRESIDENT and 1845-1849 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Charles L. Vickers designed by Susan Gamble while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 80 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2009-P James K. Polk, Position A

2009-D James K. Polk, Position A

2009-P James K. Polk, Position B

2009-D James K. Polk, Position B

Proofs

2009-S James K. Polk

Special Strikes

2009-P James K. Polk- Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D James K. Polk- Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P James K. Polk- Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D James K. Polk- Position B, Satin Finish

(2009) James K. Polk, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

Zachary Taylor Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Zachary Taylor , Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 12th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2009. The coin features a portrait of President Zachary Taylor, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 12th PRESIDENT and 1849-1850 on the bottom. Don Everhart designed the obverse and reverse. More than 78 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2009-P Zachary Taylor, Position A

2009-D Zachary Taylor, Position A

2009-P Zachary Taylor, Position B

2009-D Zachary Taylor, Position B

Proofs

2009-S Zachary Taylor

Special Strikes

2009-P Zachary Taylor- Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D Zachary Taylor- Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P Zachary Taylor- Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D Zachary Taylor- Position B, Satin Finish

(2009) Zachary Taylor, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

Millard Fillmore Presidential Dollar

This was the 13th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2010. The coin features a portrait of President Millard Fillmore, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 13th PRESIDENT and 1850-1853 on the bottom. Don Everhart designed the obverse and reverse. More than 74 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2010-P Millard Fillmore, Position A

2010-D Millard Fillmore, Position A

2010-P Millard Fillmore, Position B

2010-D Millard Fillmore, Position B

Proofs

2010-S Millard Fillmore

Special Strikes

(2010) Millard Fillmore, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

2010-D Millard Fillmore – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D Millard Fillmore – Position B, Satin Finish

2010-P Millard Fillmore – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P Millard Fillmore – Position B, Satin Finish

Franklin Pierce Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Franklin Pierce, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 14th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2010. The coin features a portrait of President Franklin Pierce, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 14th PRESIDENT and 1853-1857 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Charles L. Vickers designed by Susan Gamble while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 76 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2010-P Franklin Pierce, Position A

2010-D Franklin Pierce, Position A

2010-P Franklin Pierce, Position B

2010-D Franklin Pierce, Position B

Proofs

2010-S Franklin Pierce

Special Strikes

(2010) Franklin Pierce, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

2010-D Franklin Pierce – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D Franklin Pierce – Position B, Satin Finish

2010-P Franklin Pierce – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P Franklin Pierce – Position B, Satin Finish

James Buchanan Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar James Buchanan, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 15th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2010. The coin features a portrait of President James Buchanan, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 15th PRESIDENT and 1857-1861 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 73 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2010-P James Buchanan, Position A

2010-D James Buchanan, Position A

2010-P James Buchanan, Position B

2010-D

Proofs

2010-S James Buchanan

2010-S James Buchanan – First Strike

Special Strikes

2010-P James Buchanan – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P James Buchanan – Position B, Satin Finish

2010-D James Buchanan – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D James Buchanan – Position B, Satin Finish

(2010) James Buchanan, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

Abraham Lincoln Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Abraham Lincoln, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 16th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one to be minted in 2010. The coin features a portrait of President Abraham Lincoln, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 16th PRESIDENT and 1861-1865 on the bottom. Don Everhart designed the obverse and reverse. More than 97 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2010-P Abraham Lincoln, Position A

2010-D Abraham Lincoln, Position A

2010-P Abraham Lincoln, Position B

2010-D Abraham Lincoln, Position B

(2010) Abrahan Lincoln, Missing Edge Lettering

Proofs

2010-S Abraham Lincoln

Special Strikes

(2010) Abrahan Lincoln, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

2010-D Abraham Lincoln – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D Abraham Lincoln – Position B, Satin Finish

2010-P Abraham Lincoln – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P Abraham Lincoln – Position B, Satin Finish

Andrew Johnson Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Andew Johnson, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 17th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one minted in 2011. The coin features a portrait of President Andrew Johnson, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 17th PRESIDENT and 1865-1869 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 72 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2011-P Andrew Johnson, Position A

2011-D Andrew Johnson, Position A

2011-P Andrew Johnson, Position B

2011-D Andrew Johnson, Position B

Proofs

2011-S Andrew Johnson

2011-S Andrew Johnson – with Signature

Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Ulysses S. Grant $1 Presidential Coin obverse, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 18th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2011. The coin features a portrait of President Ulysses S. Grant, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 18th PRESIDENT and 1869-1877 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 76 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2011-P Ulysses S. Grant, Position A

2011-D Ulysses S. Grant, Position A

2011-P Ulysses S. Grant, Position B

2011-D Ulysses S. Grant, Position B

Proofs

2011-S Ulysses S. Grant

2011-S Ulysses S. Grant – with Signature

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Rutherford B. Hayes $1 Presidential Coin obverse, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 19th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2011. The coin features a portrait of President Rutherford B. Hayes, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 19th PRESIDENT and 1877-1881 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 74 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2011-P Rutherford B. Hayes, Position A

2011-D Rutherford B. Hayes, Position A

2011-P Rutherford B. Hayes, Position B

2011-D Rutherford B. Hayes, Position B

Proofs

2011-S Rutherford B. Hayes

2011-S Rutherford B. Hayes – with Signature

James A. Garfield Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, James Garfield $1 Presidential Coin obverse, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 20th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one to be minted in 2011. The coin features a portrait of President James A. Garfield, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 20th PRESIDENT and 1881 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill while by Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 74 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2011-P James Garfield, Position A

2011-D James Garfield, Position A

2011-P James Garfield, Position B

2011-D James Garfield, Position B

Proofs

2011-S James Garfield

2011-S James Garfield – with Signature

Chester Arthur Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2012 Pres $1 Arthur unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 21st Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2012. The coin features a portrait of President Chester Arthur, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 21st PRESIDENT and 1881-1885 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 10 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2012-P Chester Arthur, Position A

2012-D Chester Arthur, Position A

2012-P Chester Arthur, Position B

2012-D Chester Arthur, Position B

Proofs

2012-S Chester A. Arthur

2012-S Chester A. Arthur – with Signature

Grover Cleveland Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2012 Pres $1 Cleveland1 unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 22nd Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2012. The coin features a portrait of President Grover Cleveland, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 22nd PRESIDENT and 1885-1889 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2012-P Grover Cleveland 22nd, Position A

2012-D Grover Cleveland 22nd, Position A

2012-P Grover Cleveland 22nd, Position B

2012-D Grover Cleveland 22nd, Position B

Proofs

2012-S Grover Cleveland 22nd

2012-S Grover Cleveland 22nd – with Signature

Benjamin Harrison Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2012 Pres $1 Harrison unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 23rd Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2012. The coin features a portrait of President Benjamin Harrison, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 23rd PRESIDENT and 1889-1893 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2012-P Benjamin Harrison, Position A

2012-D Benjamin Harrison, Position A

2012-P Benjamin Harrison, Position B

2012-D Benjamin Harrison, Position B

Proofs

2012-S Benjamin Harrison

2012-S Benjamin Harrison – with Signature

Grover Cleveland Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2012 Pres $1 Cleveland2 unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 24th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one to be minted in 2012. Since President Grover Cleveland was again seated in the position, the coin features a portrait of him, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 24th PRESIDENT and 1893-1897 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 13 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2012-P Grover Cleveland 24th, Position A

2012-D Grover Cleveland 24th, Position A

2012-P Grover Cleveland 24th, Position B

2012-D Grover Cleveland 24th, Position B

Proofs

2012-S Grover Cleveland 24th

2012-S Grover Cleveland 24th – with Signature

William McKinley Presidential Dollar

US Mint, 25 William McKinley 2000, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 25th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2013. The coin features a portrait of President William McKinley, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 25th PRESIDENT and 1897-1901 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. Less than 10 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2013-P William McKinley, Position A

2013-D William McKinley, Position A

2013-P William McKinley, Position B

2013-D William McKinley, Position B

Proofs

2013-S William McKinley

Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 26 Theodore Roosevelt 2000, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 26th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one minted in 2013. The coin features a portrait of President Theodore Roosevelt, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 26th PRESIDENT and 1901-1909 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2013-P Theodore Roosevelt, Position A

2013-D Theodore Roosevelt, Position A

2013-P Theodore Roosevelt, Position B

2013-D Theodore Roosevelt, Position B

Proofs

2013-S Theodore Roosevelt

William Howard Taft Presidential Dollar

US Mint, 27 William Howard Taft 2000, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 27th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2013. The coin features a portrait of President William Howard Taft, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 27th PRESIDENT and 1909-1913 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Michael Gaudioso and designed by Barbara Fox while the reverse was designed by Don Everhart. More than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2013-P William Howard Taft, Position A

2013-D William Howard Taft, Position A

2013-P William Howard Taft, Position B

2013-D William Howard Taft, Position B

Proofs

2013-S William H. Taft

Woodrow Wilson Presidential Dollar

US Mint, 28 Woodrow Wilson 2000, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 28th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2013. The coin features a portrait of President Woodrow Wilson, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 28th PRESIDENT and 1913-1921 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. Less than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2013-P Woodrow Wilson, Position A

2013-D Woodrow Wilson, Position A

2013-P Woodrow Wilson, Position B

2013-D Woodrow Wilson, Position B

Proofs

2013-S Woodrow Wilson

Warren G. Harding Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 14 Harding Dollar Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 29th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2014. The coin features a portrait of President Warren G. Harding, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 29th PRESIDENT and 1921-1923 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Michael Gaudioso and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2014-P Warren G. Harding, Position A

2014-D Warren G. Harding, Position A

2014-P Warren G. Harding Position B

2014-D Warren G. Harding Position B

Proofs

2014-S Warren G. Harding

Calvin Coolidge Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Coolidge Unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 30th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one minted in 2014. The coin features a portrait of President Calvin Coolidge, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 30th PRESIDENT and 1923-1929 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2014-P Calvin Coolidge Position A

2014-P Calvin Coolidge Position B

2014-D Calvin Coolidge Position A

2014-D Calvin Coolidge Position B

Proofs

2014-S Calvin Coolidge

Herbert Hoover Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2014 Hoover Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 31st Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2014. The coin features a portrait of President Herbert Hoover, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 31st PRESIDENT and 1929-1933 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. Less than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2014-P Herbert Hoover Position A

2014-P Herbert Hoover Position B

2014-D Herbert Hoover Position A

2014-D Herbert Hoover Position B

Proofs

2014-S Herbert Hoover

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2014 Roosevelt Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 32nd Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2014. The coin features a portrait of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 32nd PRESIDENT and 1933-1945 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2014-P Franklin D. Roosevelt Position A

2014-P Franklin D. Roosevelt Position B

2014-D Franklin D. Roosevelt Position A

2014-D Franklin D. Roosevelt Position B

Proofs

2014-S Franklin D. Roosevelt

Harry S Truman Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2015 Truman Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 33rd Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2015. The coin features a portrait of President Harry S Truman, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 33rd PRESIDENT and 1945-1853 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. Less than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2015-P Harry S. Truman, Position A

2015-P Harry S. Truman, Position B

2015-D Harry S. Truman, Position A

2015-D Harry S. Truman, Position B

Proofs

2015-S Harry S. Truman

2015-P Harry S. Truman Rev Proof

Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Eisenhower Unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 34th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2015. The coin features a portrait of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 34th PRESIDENT and 1853-1961 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower, Position A

2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower, Position B

2015-D Dwight D. Eisenhower, Position A

2015-D Dwight D. Eisenhower, Position B

(2015) Missing Edge Lettering

Proofs

2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower Rev PR

2015-S Dwight D. Eisenhower

John F. Kennedy Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Kennedy Unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 35th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one minted in 2015. The coin features a portrait of President John F. Kennedy, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 35th PRESIDENT and 1961-1963 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 11 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2015-P John F. Kennedy, Position A

2015-P John F. Kennedy, Position B

2015-D John F. Kennedy, Position A

2015-D John F. Kennedy, Position B

Proofs

2015-S John F. Kennedy

Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, LJohnson Unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 36th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2015. The coin features a portrait of President Lyndon B. Johnson, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 36th PRESIDENT and 1963-1969 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Jim Licaretz and Michael Gaudioso and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 12 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2015-P Lyndon B. Johnson, Position A

2015-P Lyndon B. Johnson, Position B

2015-D Lyndon B. Johnson, Position A

2015-D Lyndon B. Johnson, Position B

Proofs

2015-S Lyndon B. Johnson

Richard Nixon Presidential Dollar

Mikhail Numismat, 1 dollar coin 2016 Richard Nixon, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 37th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2016. The coin features a portrait of President Richard Nixon, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 37th PRESIDENT and 1969-1974 on the bottom. The obverse and the reverse designed by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2016-P Richard M. Nixon, Position A

2016-P Richard M. Nixon, Position B

2016-D Richard M. Nixon, Position A

2016-D Richard M. Nixon, Position B

Proofs

2016-S Richard Nixon

Gerald Ford Presidential Dollar

This was the 38th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one minted in 2016. The coin features a portrait of President Gerald Ford, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 38th PRESIDENT and 1974-1977 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 10 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2016-P Gerald R. Ford, Position A

2016-P Gerald R. Ford, Position B

2016-D Gerald R. Ford, Position A

2016-D Gerald R. Ford, Position B

Proofs

2016-S Gerald Ford

Ronald Reagan Presidential Dollar

Crashguy42, Ronald Reagan Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 39th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd and last one minted in 2016. The coin features a portrait of President Ronald Reagan, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 40th PRESIDENT and 1981-1989 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Joseph Menna and designed by Richard Masters and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 13 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2016-P Ronald Reagan, Position A

2016-P Ronald Reagan, Position B

2016-D Ronald Reagan, Position A

2016-D Ronald Reagan, Position B

Proofs

2016-S Ronald Reagan

Collecting Presidential $1 Coins

Because there were many Presidential Dollars as well as lots of varieties and error, it makes an exciting collection for every coin collector and enthusiast. Those dated in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2015 with Missing Edge Letterings are considered the major varieties while the minor varieties included those with double inverted edge lettering, double overlapped edge lettering and weak and partial edge lettering are considered minor varieties.

Coin Collectors usually collect all Presidential Dollars issued per year without bothering for the mint mar. One can purchase PCGS-graded Presidential Dollar Coins starting at $1.00 up to $6,500.00 in Regular Strikes and $4.00-$1,000.00 for Proofs/Special Strikes.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, United States Mint, My Coin Guide

 

The Sacagawea Dollar

After the final days Susan Anthony Dollars, a new coin emerged with a surprising twist – it was dollar coin with a Gold color that is a result of years of planning, research, and deliberation. Years of downplaying what was known as a “coin failure”, the Anthony Dollars was succeeded by a dollar coin with a reeded edge and is made up of Copper, Zinc, Manganese, and Nickel. It first appeared in the year 2000 and was called the Sacagawea Dollar or the Golden Dollar.

Coin collectors and enthusiasts alike rejoiced upon learning about the birth of the Sacagawea Dollar – a new $1 coin to add to their collection. By the year 2009, the excitement skyrocketed after a new series was issued – Sacagawea Dollars with a new design on the reverse. It has a rich history and the portrait on the Sacagawea Dollar makes it a great collection for for coin enthusiasts and collectors alike.

The History of the Sacagawea Dollar

A report made by the Research Triangle Institute concluded that a new coin is in order. During one of their research, they came to a conclusion that although dollar bills are more convenient to use thanks to its weight and the barely there space it occupies, coins are still a much better choice. Paper bills are not only too prone to damages – these only have a lifespan of 18 months as opposed to that of a coin – which was 25-30 years.

This research report made its way to the Congress, and the next year, the Anthony Dollar was born. However, the idea of coinage did not settle with the public, and eventually chose the familiar paper money instead of the dollar coin.

Years have passed and the idea of minting a new coin resurfaced. A legislation was signed on December 1, 1997, by President Bill Clinton known as the United States Dollar Coin Act of 1997. The said Act authorized the creation of a new dollar coin to replace the Susan Anthony Dollar Coin without making the same mistake that caused the failure of the Anthony Dollar. The coin was meant to be visibly distinct – something that won’t resemble the quarter so as not to confuse the public.

Sacagawea was chosen as the main design of the coin. The young female was a Shoshone Indian who assisted the expedition of Lewis and Clark. She was only fifteen years old and is pregnant at the time she and her husband, Toussaint Charbonneau were employed by the two adventurers to guide them through the Great Plains going to the Pacific Ocean and then making their way back home.

Her great contributions were far greater than guiding the expedition and acting as their translator to do trades, but she was also able to provide the much-needed knowledge her companions needed to survive the trip. She also safely recovered the journals that recorded their travel even while her baby was strapped on her back, and was able to negotiate with Native Americans – eventually letting them go home with no casualties.

With more than enough reasons to honor her and her name, she was chosen as the face of the new dollar coin. The problem is, there was no portrait that the US Mint can use for the coin, so they made use of Randy’L Teton’s features, an Indian who came from the same tribe as Sacagawea.

The Sacagawea Dollar’s obverse was designed by Glenna Goodacre – a sculptor from New Mexico. His initials GG can be found on Sacagawea ‘s shawl. The reverse, on the other hand, was designed by Thomas D. Rogers, Sr., US Mint Engraver, and Sculptor. His reverse features an American Eagle and his initials TDR appears on the Eagle’s tail.

The Sacagawea Dollars were minted in three US Mints – Philadelphia and Denver Mints struck coins intended for circulation while the San Francisco Mint produced proofs, although a single issue was produced in the West Point Mint where 22 karats Gold Sacagawea Dollars (Proof) were minted. These were issued in March 2000 and was met with mixed reviews.

The new Sacagawea Dollar was advertised through televisions, but only coin collectors were educated enough to know that the so-called Golden Dollars were not made of Gold. Since these were made up of Copper, Nickel, Zinc and Manganese, the color of the coin changed from a Golden color to a dark mustard overtime.

By 2009, Sacagawea Dollar Coins were minted with various designs on the reverse. The reason is to honor different Native Americans.

The Detailed Specifications of the Sacagawea Dollars

AKS.9955, 1 Dollar (United States), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Sacagawea Dollar has an outer layer made up of a Manganese-Brass which was banded with a pure copper core. The composition was 88.5% Copper, 6% Zinc, 3.5 Manganese, and 2% Nickel. It weighs about 8.10 grams, is 26.50 millimeters in diameter and has a plain edge.  It has a border that looked to be unusual, giving it a medallic look.

The Sacagawea Dollar Design 2000-2008

The Obverse

AKS.9955, 1 Dollar (United States), front, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY 4.0

The obverse was designed by Glenna Goodacre. It features a three-quarter profile of Sacagawea with large dark eyes. Strapped on her back as her infant, Jean Baptiste. The legend LIBERTY is on top of her in a form of an arc. The inscriptions IN GOD WE TRUST was inscribed on the left side of the coin while the date is on the right just below her chin and the respective mintmark where the coin was minted. Goodacre’s initials (GG) are on the lower left portion of the coin, on Sacagawea’s shawl.

The Reverse

United States Mint, 2003 Sacagawea Rev, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

As for the reverse, an American Eagle is seen soaring on the back of the coin and was being surrounded by seventeen stars that were strategically placed encircling the Eagle. E PLURIBUS UNUM inside the stars, located just above the head of the Eagle. The legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is seen in a form of an arc above the stars and Eagle while the denomination ONE DOLLAR is on the lowest part of the reverse. The initials of Thomas D. Rogers, Sr. (TDR) is seen on the right after the R in DOLLAR. This design for the reverse stayed up until 2008.

2009 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2009NativeAmericanRev, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

By 2009, the reverse was replaced with what was called “The Three Sisters method of planting.” The design was sculpted by Norman E. Nemeth and depicts a Native American in a field of corns, beans, and squash while planting seeds. The obverse stayed the same – with the exemption of date and mintmark which were both removed from the design. The edges from this year and the succeeding years are now lettered edges.

2010 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2010NativeAmerican Rev, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

A Hiawatha Belt which was surrounded by five arrows replaced the 2009 reverse design. These depict the five confederacy nations – namely Onondaga, Mohawk, Cayuga, Oneida, and Seneca. Haudenosaunee was inscribed just below the belt and arrows while Great Law of Peace is on the lowest part of the coin. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is on the top portion of the reverse followed by the denomination $1. This was designed by Thomas Cleveland. CLV initials are on one of the arrows’ feathers.

2011 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2011NativeAmericanRev, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The theme for this year’s Sacagawea Dollars was “Diplomacy – Treaties with Tribal Nations.” A peace pipe was seen which was passed on the hands of Massasoit of the Wampanoag Nation and Plymouth Bay’s settler governor. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is still on the topmost part of the coin followed by the denomination $1. Wampanoag Treaty 1621 is written below the hands. It was designed by Richard Masters and while Joseph Menna did the sculpting.

2012 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, Sacagawea dollar reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The theme Trade Routes in the 17th Century was used wherein a Native American and a horse is featured in the reverse along with three horses running in the background. $1 denomination is placed below the running horses while the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA was strategically placed in a form of an arc above the horse. This was designed by Thomas Cleveland and sculpted by Phebe Hemphill. From this year onwards, all Sacagawea Dollar produced are only made and distributed among collectors.

2013 Sacagawea Dollar

AgentVpiski787, The Delaware Treaty coin, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

Susan Gamble designed the reverse of the 2013 Sacagawea Dollar. It features a turkey, turtle and a howling wolf – a symbolism for the tribe in Delaware.  In the level of the wolf’s chest lies the denomination $1 and the three animals were surrounded by an arc of stars. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA was position on the top of the stars while Treaty With The Delawares and the date was below the animals.

2014 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2014 Native American Coin, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This 2014 Sacagawea Dollar features a male Native American holding a ceremonial pipe and a female, her wife was holding a plate of crops. William Clark’s compass is seen in the background displaying the word NW (northwest). The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is on an arc on the left side of the coin while the denomination $1 is on the right.

2015 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2015 Native American Coin, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Phebe Hemphill engraved the design made by Ronald D. Sanders on the reverse. A Mohawk high iron worker is depicted while reaching for a swinging I-beam. The city’s skyline is pictured on an elevated view and the inscriptions Mohawk Ironworkers below it. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is inscribed on top while the denomination $1 is in between the bean and skyline.

2016 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2016 Native American Coin, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Thomas D. Rogers Sr. designed a reverse with two soldier helmets and feathers behind each are strategically placed to form the letter V. Rogers Sr.’s initials TDR just below the left helmet and feather, WWI on the far left and WWII on the far right. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and $1 is on top of the coin while CODE TALKERS on the lowest part of the reverse.

2017 Sacagawea Dollar

Designed by Chris Costello, engraved by Charles L. Vickers, image created for the U.S. Mint, 2017 Native American dollar reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Chris Costello designed the reverse while Charles L. Vickers sculpted it. A Native American is seen writing with a feather pen and the word Sequoyah placed next to his face. The legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and Sequoyah from Cherokee Nation written in syllabary are on the top of the coin. $1 and initials CTC are on the lower side of the coin near the feather pen.

2018 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2018 Native American Dollar Reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Jim Thorpe was depicted showing his Olympic and Football achievements. His name HIM THORPE is on the top of the coin in a form of an arc, followed by $1 and WA-THO-HUK and the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA situated on the lowest portion of the coin. This was designed by Michael Gaudioso.

The Sacagawea Dollars can be classified into two:

 

  • Sacagawea Dollar (2000-2008)

 

This has the original obverse and reverse designs. It has coins struck in regulars strikes, proofs, and special strikes.

Regular Strikes

2000-P Sacagawea Dollar – a total of 767,140,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint with the following variants

2000-P Mule w/State 25C Obv

2000-P “Cheerios” Dollar

2000-P Wounded Eagle

2000-D Sacagawea Dollar – a total of 518,916,000 coins were minted at the Denver Mint with the following variant

2000-D Millennium Set

2001-P – a total of 62,468,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2001-D – a total of 70,939,500 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2002-P – a total of 3,865,610 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2002-D – a total of 3,732,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2003-P – a total of 3,080,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2003-D – a total of 3,080,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2004-P – a total of 2,660,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2004-D – a total of 2,660,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2005-P – a total of 2,525,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2005-D – a total of 2,520,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2006-P – a total of 4,900,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2006-D – a total of 2,800,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2007-P – a total of 3,640,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2007-D – a total of 3,920,000 with the following variant

2007-D Edge Lettering

2008-P – a total of 1,820,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2008-D – a total of 14,840,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

Proofs

2000-S – a total of 3,082,483 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2000-W 22kt Gold – a total of 39 pieces were minted at the West Point Mint

2001-S – a total of 3,184,606 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2002-S – a total of 3,211,995 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2003-S – a total of 3,298,439 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2004-S – a total of 2,985,000 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2005-S – a total of 3,300,000 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2006-S – a total of 3,054,436 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2007-S – a total of 2,062,793 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2008-S – mintage not available

Special Strikes

2000-P Goodacre Presentation

2005-P Satin Finish

2005-D Satin Finish

2006-P Satin Finish  

2006-D Satin Finish

2007-P Satin Finish

2007-D Satin Finish

2008-P Satin Finish

2008-D Satin Finish

(2010) Native American, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

 

  • Native American Sacagawea Dollar (2009 to date)

 

After 2008, the obverse was stripped of the date and mintmark and every year starting 2009, a new design is used for the reverse. Cons were struck in regular strikes, proofs, and special strikes.

Regular Strikes

2009 Native American, Missing Edge Lettering

2009-P Native American, Position A

2009-P Native American, Position B

2009-D Native American, Position A

2009-D Native American, Position B

2010-P Native American, Position A

2010-D Native American, Position A

2010-P Native American, Position B

2010-D Native American, Position B

2011-P Native American, Position A

2011-P Weak Edge Lettering

2011-D Native American, Position A

2011-P Native American, Position B

2011-D Native American, Position B

2012-P Native American, Position A

2012-D Native American, Position A

2012-P Native American, Position B

2012-D Native American, Position B

2013-P Treaty with the Delawares, Position A

2013-D Treaty with the Delawares, Position A

2013-P Treaty with the Delawares, Position B

2013-D Treaty with the Delawares, Position B

2014-P Native American, Position A

2014-P Native American, Position B

2014-D Native American, Position A

2014-D Native American, Position B

2014-D Native American Enhanced

Proofs

2009-S Native American

2010-S Native American

2014-S Native American

2011-S Native American

2012-S Native American

2013-S Native American

Special Strikes

(2009) Native American, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2009-P Native American, Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P Native American, Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D Native American, Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D Native American, Position B, Satin Finish

2010-P Native American, Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D Native American, Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P Native American, Position B, Satin Finish

2010-D Native American, Position B, Satin Finish

Collecting Sacagawea Dollars

No one can deny that Sacagawea Dollar coins are beautiful coins worthy of collecting. There are rarities and errors sought-after by coin collectors.

The following are the rarities or key dates when it comes to collecting Sacagawea Dollar Coins.

2000-P Cheerios Dollars

When the US Mint started to mint the Sacagawea Dollars, they gave away some of these in boxes of Cheerios that were specially marked by the US Mint. It was only when regular issued Sacagawea Dollars were issued that people started to notice the difference between the two. The rare issues placed on the specially marked Cheerios boxes have crisp and sharp details on the tail feathers of the Eagle while the regular issued Sacagawea Dollars have tail feathers that were not enhanced.

2000-P Goodacre Presentation Specimens

This special strike coin was given a proof or specimen-like look after these were struck on burnished plankets.no one is reported to have a collection of this specimen.

2000-P Wounded Eagle Die Variety

The die used in this variety has three raised die flaws which resulted in a cut on the Eagle’s wing and torso. The exact cause of the flaw hasn’t been pinpointed but it was reported that less than 200 were minted with this error.

2007 Sacagawea Dollar with Edge Lettering

When the US Mint began issuing Presidential Dollars, some Sacagawea Dollars were minted with edge lettering instead of the plain one. It was only in the year 2009 that the Sacagawea Dollar adapted the edge lettering. One should be vigilant if you happen to stumble on 2007 Sacagawea Dollars with edge lettering as these can be easily manipulated. Authentication is needed to make sure you get an original instead of the fabricated 2007 Sacagawea Dollar with edge lettering.

One can buy PCGS-graded Sacagawea Dollars starting $1.00 up to $12,500.00 for Regular Strikes while Proofs can range from $4.00-$40.00. As for Special Strike Sacagawea Dollars, the price can range between $2.00-$8,000.00.

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coin Facts, NGC Coin, Coin Facts, My Coin Guides

The Trade Dollar

Being one of the shortest-lived series in the history of the American Numismatics, coin collectors have been enjoying collecting Trade Dollars. Because Silver Coins, including the Trade Dollars, were big, fun to collect and not to mention having a high Silver Content only adds to the thrill of the hunt. Before, these called Commercial Dollars since these were meant to be used as money for export, but were soon coined as Trade Dollars.

History of the Trade Dollar

In the early 1870s, the United States has been having problems with international commerce, specifically, in China. China has always favored the Eight Reale or the Mexican Peso due to its high silver content. During this type, the US have been using Liberty Dollars which were hesitantly accepted by China during the trade. Not only that – these are accepted at a discounted price only to be melted afterward.

The reason for this was the Liberty Dollar have a lesser amount of Pure Silver content and a lesser fineness on it. Merchants in China were able to recognize this, thus favoring the obvious choice – the Mexican Peso. The Congress needed to make a decision, and fast, so the US Treasury Department created a coin that will be used for international trade. Thus, the Act of Feb. 12, 1873, was born.

It was in 1873 that the first Trade Dollar was minted, with the purpose of competing with the Mexican Dollar. It was designed by US Mint Chief Engraver William Barber and a large number of the Trade Dollar were minted at the Philadelphia Mint. Majority of the Trade Dollars minted during 1873-1874 were mostly used for commercial trade. Chinese merchants have tried and tested the authenticity of the Trade Dollar, which is why many of these silver dollars had chop marks indicating their personal trademarks in Chinese Characters.

The Trade Dollar features Miss Liberty facing right while the reverse features an Eagle clutching an olive branch and three arrows using its talons. It was slightly heavier than the regular silver dollar, weighing 420 grains and with a fineness of .900.

The Trade Dollar was minted from July 1873 up to April 1878. During 1873-1874 the first 2 years of the production of Trade Dollars were used for trade in the Orient. It was intended for international commerce but was also used as a legal tender – amounting up to $5 for about four years.

By 1875, these were used more in the US. There are some who bought Trade Dollars with the purpose of using them for their bullion value – these are employers who used the Trade Dollars for their face value as payment for their workers. As a result, the workers suffered as the Trade Dollars were either accepted for their bullion value, a lower price or worse, refused.

In 1876 the price of Silver has already declined, resulting to a huge amount of Trade Dollars to be sent back to the US. By 1878, the Sherman Silver Act was passed thanks to John Sherman. This Act mandated to stop the production of Trade Dollars. No business strike Trade Dollars were struck at this time – only Proof coins. Congress has already canceled the authorization given to the Trade Dollar, and eventually, unblemished Trade Coins were retrieved.

The Detailed Specification of the Trade Dollar

Designed by Christian Gobrecht for the US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1873-1$-Seated Liberty (Trade dollar), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Trade Dollar was designed by William Barber. It weighs approximately 27.20 grams, has a reeded edge, is 38.10 in diameter and is made up of 90% Silver and 10% Copper. Trade Dollars were minted from 1873-1875 in US Mints located in Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Carson City. The largest Trade Dollar producing mint was the Philadelphia Mint, while the Carson City Mint has the lowest mintages.

Department of the Treasury, Bureau of the Mint, TradeDollarObverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

For the obverse, Miss Liberty is seen seated on a bale or merchandise, facing right. On her left hand is a ribbon where the word LIBERTY was inscribed with a wheat sheaf behind it and the sea in front. On her right hand, she is holding an olive branch. IN GOD WE TRUST was written on the foot of the bale, the date below it and 13 stars surrounding Miss Liberty in a form of an arc.

Department of the Treasury, Bureau of the Mint, TradeDollarReverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

For the reverse, a perched, Bald Eagle is holding three arrows and an olive branch on its talons. A ribbon above the Eagle read E PLURIBUS UNUM, and the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA in a form of an arc lays above the Eagle and ribbon. 420 GRAINS, 900 Fine are written just below the Eagle, followed by the mintmark if any (CC for Carson City, S for San Francisco while Philadelphia bears no mintmark) and the words TRADE DOLLAR on the lowest part of the coin.

The following are the Regular Strikes of the Trade Dollar

1873 Trade Dollar – 396,635 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1873-CC Trade Dollar – 124,500 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1873-S Trade Dollar – 703,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1874 Trade Dollar – 987,100 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1874-CC Trade Dollar – 1,373,200 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1874-S Trade Dollar – 2,549,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1875 Trade Dollar – 218,200 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1875-CC Trade Dollar – 1,573,700 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1875-S Trade Dollar – 4,487,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1875-S S/CC Over mintmark Trade Dollar – 4,487,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1876 Trade Dollar – 455,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1876-CC Trade Dollar – 509,000 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1876-S Trade Dollar – 5,227,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1877 Trade Dollar – 3,039,200 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1877-CC Trade Dollar – 534,000 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1877-S Trade Dollar – 9,519,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1878-CC Trade Dollar – 97,000 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1878-S Trade Dollar – 4,162,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

The following are Proofs Trade Dollar

1873 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 865 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1874 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 700 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1875 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 700 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1876 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 1,150 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1877 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 510 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1878 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 900 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1879 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 1,541 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1880 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 1,987 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1881 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 960 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1882 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 1,097 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1883 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 979 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1884 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 10 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1885 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 5 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Collecting Trade Dollars

When it comes to Trade Dollars, it is important to note that the places to look for wear are Miss Liberty’s ear, breast, and her left knee, as well as the head of the Eagle and its left wing.

Prices for regular strike coins range from $60.00 to $250,000.00 depending on the rarity and grade of the coin. For Proofs, prices range from $1,000.00 up to $3,750,000.00.

Great finds are the Trade Dollars dated 1873, 1873-CC, 1874, 1874-CC, 1875, 1875-S, 1876, 1876-CC, 1877-CC, 1878-CC and 1878-S – the 1878-CC Trade Dollar being the rarest of them all.

The Ultra Rare Trade Dollars most sought-after by coin collectors are the 1884 (Proof) and 1885 (Proof). There are only 10 known 1884 Proofs and 5 1885 Proofs known to exist. These two proofs were kept and minted in secret by the US Mint, and it wasn’t only when

According to PCGS, 1884 Proof Trade Dollars are worth $450,000.00-$1,250,000.00. As for 1885 Proofs, price ranges from $1,750,000.00-$3,750,000.00. For a price guide on PCGS-graded Trade Dollar Coins, you use this link.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, tradedollars.net, Coin Week

The Liberty Seated Dollars

The Liberty Seated Dollar was the coin that succeeded the Draped Bust Dollar, particularly the 1804 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagles. It was in the year 1840 when the nation’s coinage system was all about Silver and Gold coins, and when paper money was still considered worthless by the public. And so, the US Mint worked hard to create a Silver Dollar Coin that will be used in the circulation.

Robert Maskell Patterson, the US Mint Director back then have always been a huge admirer of the British Copper Coinage – particularly the Seated Brittania. with this, he envisioned a new Silver Dollar Coin that would truly embody an emblematic portrait of Lady Liberty. Thus, he went to work and employed Thomas Sully, a renowned portrait painter to create the design for the new Miss Liberty similar to that of that Seated Brittania.

Sully obliged and began to create sketches of Miss Liberty while she sits on a rock while wearing a gorgeous Grecian robe. On her right arm, she is holding a pole with a small Liberty Cap on the top, while her left arms can be seen supporting a Union shield where the legend Liberty is inscribed on a scroll.

Once the sketch is done, Christian Gobrechtm the US Mint Engraver Assistant went to work and used Sully’s portrait of Miss Liberty to make it suitable for coinage. These were used in bass-relief art and the design appeared on some dimes, half-dimes, quarters, dollars, half-dollars and 20 cents minted from 1836 up until 1891.

The final design used for the Liberty Seated Dollar was Miss Liberty having a rounded head and her right long arm dangling while her left arm appears to be remarkably shorter. Patterns for the Liberty Seated Dollars in 1836 and 1839 have the artist’s signature but bearing no stars on the obverse. As for the reverse’s original design, a magnificent Eagle is featured flying in a plain or starry sky. Unfortunately, the No Motto Silver Dollar Coin that was minted during 1840-1865 replaced the flying Eagle with one that has a shield on its chest and dropped wings. Miss Liberty is seen seated with 13 stars surrounding her and the date placed below.

The No Motto Seated Liberty Dollar do no bear the IN GOD WE TRUST motto just yet. Each coin bears the mintmark of the Mints that produced them: those minted in Philadelphia bears no mint mark, those minted in the San Francisco Mint has the mintmark S while those made in New Orleans has the mintmark O. The series consists of 2,895,673 pieces of coins struck.

Starting 1866, the Seated Liberty Dollar was minted with the motto In God We Trust. The reason behind this was US Mint Director James Pollock received a letter sent by Salmon P. Chase, current US Mint Director at that time. The letter by Chase suggested that all US Coins bear the motto IN GOD WE TRUST as a form of recognition of deity.

Wasting no time, Pollock set to work and had patterns created with the suggested motto. He sent these to Secretary Chase together with a letter suggesting that the motto is shortened to GOD, OUR TRUST. Pollock felt the idea was concise, and suggested that the placement of the motto be placed on the just above the eagle, within a scroll on the reverse side of the coin.

Half dollars, as well as Eagles, were struck in patterns bearing the motto GOD OUR TRUST with dates 1861 and 1862. More patterns were minted from 1863-1865 bearing the mottos GOD OUR TRUST, IN GOD WE TRUST and GOD AND OUR COUNTRY.

Finally, in 1865, Secretary Chase approved a motto. IN GOD WE TRUST appeared on US Coins and finally, the Seated Liberty Dollar was minted with the said motto after the Mint Act of March 3, 1865, authorized this on Gold and Silver Coins.

Seated Liberty Dollars with Motto were minted from 1866 up to 1873. The obverse features Miss Liberty seated on a boulder while supporting a shield of the union on her right hand and the word LIBERTY inscribed on it. She was holding a pole on her left hand where a Liberty cap is topped. She was surrounded by a total of 13 stars.

On the other side of the coin, an Eagle is seen with its wings outstretched. It has the union shield placed on its chest while grasping a single olive branch on one talon and three arrows on the other. Surrounding the Eagle above is the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the denomination ONE DOL. Below the Eagle. Those US Mints that bear their respective mintmarks can be seen directly below the Eagle.

This design bears a powerful message. Freedom is reflected in the Liberty cap while the unity of the nation is marked by the Union Shield while the motto IN GOD WE TRUST is the religious statement that is equivalent to a prayer.

Those Seated Liberty Dollars bearing the Motto may have low mintages but were nevertheless used well by the public. according to records, 3.6 million pieces of the Seated Liberty Dollars with Motto were minted while 6.060 pieces of proof coins were produced. By 1873, the US Coinage System was standardized with Gold Coins, where the Coinage Act of 1873 was named The Crime of ’73.

The Seated Liberty Dollars were made up of 90% Silver and 10% Copper. They have reeded edges, weighs about 26.73 grams and are 39 millimeters in diameter.

The Four Types of Seated Liberty Dollars

Type 1 Flying Eagle Reverse with Stars Seated Liberty Dollars

The first Seated Liberty Dollars minted in 1836 features a flying Eagle surrounded by strategically placed stars on the reverse side of the coin. These were all proof coins that were the original designs made by Gobrecht.

1836 Original – Coin Alignment Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1836 Original – Medal Alignment Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Type 2 Flying Eagle Reverse with no Stars Seated Liberty Dollars

Only one Proof was minted with the reverse featuring no stars. The Eagle on the 1839 Seated Liberty Eagle was a bit more conservative – an adaptation from the Gold Coins issued in earlier years.

1839 Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 300 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Type 3 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars

Designed by Christian Gobrecht for the US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1865-1$-Seated Liberty (no motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Regular-strike coins were finally issued in 1840 up until 1865 bearing no motto. This was the first large-scale minting of Seated Liberty Dollars with a design parallel of the other earlier issues – Seated Miss Liberty is surrounded with 13 stars while the Eagle on the reverse side of the coin no longer has the scattered stars.

Regular Strikes

1840 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 61,005 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1841 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 173,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1842 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 184,618 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1843 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 165,100 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1844 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 20,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1845 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 24,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1846 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 110,600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1846-O No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 59,000 coins were minted in New Orleans

1847 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 140,750 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1848 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 15,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1849 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 62,600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1850 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 7,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1850-O No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 40,000 coins were minted in New Orleans

1851 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,300 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1852 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,100 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1853 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 46,110 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1854 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 33,140 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1855 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 26,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1856 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 63,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1857 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 94,490 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1859 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 255,700 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1859-O No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 360,000 coins were minted in New Orleans

1859-S No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 20,000 coins were minted in San Francisco

1860 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 217,600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1860-O No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 515,000 coins were minted in New Orleans

1861 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 77,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1862 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 11,540 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1863 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 27,200 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1864 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 30,700 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1865 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 46,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Proofs

1840 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1841 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1842 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1843 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1844 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1845 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1846 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 20 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1847 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1848 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1849 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1850 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 20 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1851 Restrike No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 35 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1852 Original No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 3 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1852 Restrike No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 35 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1853 Restrike No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 12 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1854 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 30 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1855 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 60 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1856 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 50 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1857 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 50 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1858 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 300 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1859 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 800 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1860 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 1,330 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1861 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 1,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1862 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 550 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1863 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 460 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1864 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 470 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1865 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1866 No Motto No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 3 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Type 4 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars

Designed by Christian Gobrecht for the US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1873-1$-Seated Liberty (motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The last type of Seated Liberty Dollars were minted with the motto IN GOD WE TRUST located on a ribbon on the reverse side of the coin.

Regular Strikes

1866 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 48,900 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1867 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 46,900 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1868 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 162,100 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1869 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 423,700 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1870 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 415,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1870-CC With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 12,462 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1870-S With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 15 coins were minted in San Francisco

1871 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,074,760 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1871-CC With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,376 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1872 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,105,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1872-CC With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 3,150 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1872-S With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 9,000 coins were minted in San Francisco

1873 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 293,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1873-CC With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 2,300 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1873-S With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 700 coins were minted in San Francisco

Proofs

1866 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 725 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1867 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 625 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1868 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1869 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1870 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1871 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 960 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1872 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 950 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1873 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Collecting Seated Liberty Dollars

All Seated Liberty Dollars can be considered as a numismatic treasure. In collecting Seated Liberty Dollars, some of the rarities include 1851, 1852 and 1858 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars. When grading Mint State Seated Liberty Dollar coins, most have either abrasions, bag marks and even softly struck coins.

The places to look for signs of wear are Miss Liberty’s hair above the eye, her breast, and her right leg. Silver coin collectors usually collect Seated Liberty Dollars as type coins for the reason that most of these are hard to fin at affordable prices. Most collectors will have No Motto and With Motto variants.

The price ranges from $130.00-$250,000.00 for PCGS-graded Seated Liberty Coins. All Carson City minted coins are considered the keydates for the Seated Liberty Collars: 1870-CC, 1871-CC, 1872-CC and 1873-CC.

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coinfacts, NGC Coin, US Coin Values Advisor, Coin Facts

The Draped Bust Dollar

The Draped Bust Dollar was one of the earliest Silver Dollar Coins ever minted. US Silver Dollars were created by the US Mint with the intention of competing with the Spanish Milled Dollars and Spanish Eight Reales in the international market. And so, the Mint Act of April 2, 1792, was passed.

The first US Silver Dollars were struck in 1794 and were known as the Flowing Hair Dollar, thanks to the design made by Robert Scot, the US Mint Chief Engraver at that time. It featured a youthful Miss Liberty with her hair flowing freely on the obverse and an Eagle perched on a rock on the other side of the coin. However, the series was minted for a total of two years only, making it a very short collection.

The Draped Bust Dollar was created to replace the Flowing Hair Dollar. The Liberty Dollar was a very short series – it only had two years of reign before the design was replaced. Coincidentally, the change in the design coincided with the fact that the US Mint changed leadership during the same time the Draped Bust Dollar was born.

At the end of June 1795, the first US Mint Director, David Rittenhouse, stepped down from his position and was succeeded by Henry William DeSaussure. DeSaussure made sure to improve all of the designs on the US Coinage, particularly the Silver Dollar Coins, which included the Flowing Hair Dollar.

There were two Draped Bust Dollars created – the Small Eagle minted in 1795-1798 and the Heraldic Eagle minted in 1798-1804. It was said that then-President at that time, President George Washington influenced DeSaussure to ask the help of Gilbert Stuart, one of the foremost portraitists to redesign the Flowing Hair Dollar.

There were rumors that Stuart based the new portrait of Miss Liberty on a sketch of Ann Willing Bingham, a socialite from Philadelphia who was 21-years-old at that time. The portrait was used on a plaster thanks to John Eckstein of Rhode Island while Robert Scot, US Mint Chief Engraver, created the dies. The design of the obverse stayed basically the same, with the portrait of Miss Liberty improved and the reverse the same as the Flowing Hair Dollar, with just a minor modification. The Eagle now stands on a cloud instead of a rock, and it seemed to be more graceful than the first design. This came to be as the Draped Bust Dollar, Small Eagle.

During the spring of 1795, a brand new coin press that was a better version was made available. It was delivered to the US Mint at Philadelphia which really helped improve the quality of coins produced and increased the amount coined at that time. The improved coin press was able to stamp designs properly and create larger sized coins.

The Small Eagle of the Draped Bust Dollar was minted first in 1795 up until 1798. During the first year of mintage, only 42,738 pieces were produced in the last two weeks of October 1795. Production lasted for only 4 years, and only a total of 450,000 Draped Bust Small Eagles were minted.

The Draped Bust Small Eagle

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1795-$1-Draped bust (small eagle), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Small Eagle may only have lasted a couple of years, but many major varieties were produced – some of which can be distinguished by the number of stars found on the obverse and their arrangements. No proofs were struck, although there are some who has the proof-like surface.

By 1798, the reverse of the Draped Bust Dollar which used to feature a young Eagle was replaced with one that looks more natural, older and heraldic. The Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle came to life in 1798 up until 1804. All Heraldic Eagles were minted at the US Mint in Philadelphia – producing a total of 1,153,709 pieces during the six years of production.

The Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1798-$1-Draped bust (heraldic eagle), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle has many varieties, most of which are die varieties, some of which are minimal changes in the placement of However, there was also an important change in designs – such as the cross pattern on the Great Seal of the United States and the different patterns of stars on the reverse. Proofs were minted from 1801-1804.

The Draped Bust Dollars are made up to 90% Silver and 10% Copper, weighs about 27grams, is 40mm in diameter and has lettered edge (HUNDRED CENTS ONE DOLLAR OR UNIT)

The Two Types of the Draped Bust Dollar

Type 1 Draped Bust Small Eagle (1795-1798)

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1795-$1-Draped bust (small eagle), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The first issued Draped Bust is the Small Eagle. The obverse features a profile bust of Miss Liberty with her hair flowing, while she’s facing right. A total of 15 stars are seen on Miss Liberty’s side – 8 on the left and 7 on the right. The legend LIBERTY is located on top of her portrait while the date is seen below.

For the reverse, a naturalistic Eagle is seen perched on a cloud and was being surrounded by a wreath tied by a ribbon. The legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds the wreath and Eagle.

Minted for a total of 4 years, the Draped Bust Small Eagle is considered the scarcest among all early Silver Dollars.

Regular Strikes of Type 1 Draped Bust Small Eagle

1795 Draped Bust Small Eagle –42,738 pieces were minted, with the following varieties

1795 Centered Draped Bust Small Eagle

1795 Off-Center Draped Bust Small Eagle

1796 Draped Bust Small Eagle – 79,920 pieces were minted with the following varieties

1796 Small Date, Small Letters Draped Bust Small Eagle

1796 Small Date, Large Letters Draped Bust Small Eagle

1796 Large Date, Small Letters Draped Bust Small Eagle

1797 Draped Bust Small Eagle – 7,776 pieces were minted with the following varieties

1797 9X7 Large Letters Draped Bust Small Eagle

1797 10X6 Stars Draped Bust Small Eagle

1797 9X7 Small Letters Draped Bust Small Eagle

1798 Draped Bust Small Eagle – has the following varieties

1798 Small Eagle 13 Stars Draped Bust Small Eagle – 30,000 pieces were minted

1798 Small Eagle 15 Stars Draped Bust Small Eagle – 10,000 pieces were minted

Special Strikes of Type 2 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle according to PCGS CoinFacts

1795 Off-Center Bust Draped Bust Small Eagle – a total of 42,738 pieces were minted

Type 2 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle (1798-1804)

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1798-$1-Draped bust (heraldic eagle), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The second type of the Draped Bust Dollar is known as the Large Eagle or Heraldic Eagle. The obverse is basically the same as the Small Eagle, while the reverse was updated with the Eagle viewed on the front with its claws and wings spread. A bundle of arrows and an olive branch are grasped by each talon of the Eagle, while the inscription E PLURIBUS UNUM is seen on the ribbon the Eagle has on its beak. The Great Seal of the United States was placed on the Eagle’s chest. 13 stars are strategically placed just above the Eagle’s head, and an arc of clouds above the stars. The legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds the Eagle in a form of an arc.

Regular Strikes of Type 2 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1798 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle – 287,536 pieces were minted with the following varieties

1798 Knob 9, 5 Vertical Lines

1798 Knob 9, 4 Vertical Lines Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1798 Pointed 9, 5 Vertical Lines Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1798 Pointed 9, 4 Vertical Lines Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1798 Knob 9 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1798 10 Arrows Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1798 5 Stripes Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1798 Wide Date Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1799 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle – 423,515 pieces were minted with the following varieties

1799 Normal Date Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1799 Irregular Date-15 Stars Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1799 Obverse Stars 8×5 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1799/8 15 Reverse Stars Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1799/8 13 Reverse Stars Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1799 Irregular Date-13 Stars Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1800 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle – 220,920 pieces were minted with the following varieties

1800 Dotted Date Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1800 12 Arrows Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1800 10 Arrows Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1800 AMERICAI Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1800 Wide Dt, Low 8, AMERICAI Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1800 Wide Date-Low 8 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1801 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle – 54,454 pieces were minted

1802 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle – 41,650 pieces were minted with the following variety

1802/1 Overdate Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1803 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle – 85,634 pieces were minted with the following varieties

1803 Small 3 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1803 Large 3 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

Proofs of Type 2 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle

1801 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle Proof – 6 pieces were minted

1802 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle Proof – 10 pieces were minted

1803 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle Proof – 10 pieces were minted

1804 Original – Class I Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle Proof – 8 pieces were minted

1804 Restrike – Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle Proof – 15 pieces were known to exist with the following varieties

1804 Restrike – Class II Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle Proof

1804 Restrike – Class III Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle Proof

Collecting Draped Bust Dollars

Less than 1.5 Million pieces of Draped Bust Dollars were minted during its 9 years of production. Specimens for the Draped Bust Small Eagles are readily available in all grades, but, uncirculated ones are a rarity. The 1797 Draped Bust Small Eagle is one that has the lowest number of mintage issues.

For the Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle, it was said that those with the 1804 dates were actually produced in 1834 and its subsequent years. Restrict issues were dated in 1804. Most Silver Coins found nowadays have planchets cause by Mints, as well as adjustment marks.

Draped Bust Heraldic Eagle coins can be usually seen in grades that range from Very Good to Very Fine, while those in Extremely Fine and AU grades being usually scarce. Like Small Eagles, uncirculated Heraldic Eagles are rare.

PCGS-graded Drape Bust Small Eagle coins come in prices that usually range from $700.00 to $800,000.00. As for Heraldic Eagles, prices range from $650.00 up to $700,000.00 for regular strikes and $275,000 to $8,500,000.00 for Proofs. The rarest of all Draped Bust Dollars being the 1804 issues, which were created as a form of diplomatic gifts.

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coin Facts, NGC Coin, My Coin Guides, US Coin Values

The Susan B. Anthony Dollars

The Susan B. Anthony Dollar was one of the very few US coins met with indifference and enmity. Having only been minted on 1979 only for the production to be suspended on 1981, it proved to be one of those coins that the public wouldn’t want to acquire, but a collection that coin collectors would want to get their hands as proven when an adaptation for the coin debuted in 1999.

The History of the Susan B. Anthony Dollars

When the Public Law 95-447 was passed on October 10, 1978, the Congress, needless to say, the Congress had high hope in creating a new dollar coin that the public would welcome and use in everyday commerce. The legislation passed aims to mint coins that were quite similar to the Eisenhower Dollar, a Copper-Nickel Clad Coin. However, the diameter will be lessened from 38.1 mm down to 26.5 mm.

RTI or the Research Triangle Institute, which is a non-profit organization that specializes in providing research and technical services, prompted the United States Treasury Department about a report regarding the US coinage system through the year 1990.

Aside from the need for a new coin since the cent and half-dollar coins were eliminated, they claimed that a new coin that was a lot smaller, bulkier and lighter is needed in order for the public to actually use it in the daily commerce. The reason behind the logic was obvious – the previously minted One Dollar Coin – the Eisenhower Coin was only lightly used in casinos, not in circulation. The RTI reported that a smaller coin would be a more suitable replacement for the Eisenhower Dollar Coin and that it is much more economical to create coins that can last longer the One Dollar Bill.

The Congress did take RTI’s advice, but some important details were overlooked. RTI has already suggested that the new One Dollar Coin have a color or shape that is different and can be easily distinguished once place alongside the current coins in circulation.

The new coin did not have a different color as the Congress wanted the new One Dollar Coin to have the same composition that the current coins have, which was Copper-Nickel Clad. However, they did make serious considerations when it comes to creating a multi-sided coin. There were about thousands of blank coins that had eleven-sided inner borders which were then tested after being distributed to different vending machine companies.

While the shape of the new coin was still being debated, Frank Gasparro, the US Mint Chief Engraver at that time started to work on the coins’ design.

The Obverse

Image courtesy of , 1981-S SBA obverse, size, CC BY 4.0

On the obverse side of the coin, Gasparro used a model of Miss Liberty that was featured in a commemorative medal in 1969 and modified it for her to look more youthful. Gasparro actually loved this profile bust of Miss Liberty as it was already widely appreciated by the numismatic community. Unfortunately, at this point, the White House had already made a decision that a real woman will be featured on the new coin. The chosen one was Susan B. Anthony, a women’s rights advocate. Having no choice, Gasparro set to work by creating a profile bust from Anthony’s photographs. He actually tried to make her profile bust look a little bit softer than her original harsh features.  

Understandably, many of Anthony’s admirers were against this depiction of her. Even if Gasparro’s profile bust for Anthony was historically accurate, there were many who wanted a realistic portrait which only caused the coin more backlash. Since there were already people who were opposed of the idea that the new model for the coin would be Anthony, the coin did receive cruel criticism.

The Reverse

United States Mint, 1999 SBA Rev P, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

As for the reverse, no one actually knows why no serious consideration was made to creating a reverse that was different than the Eisenhower Dollar coin. It was expected that numismatics would be disappointed as the reverse on the Eisenhower was reused on the new Susan B. Anthony Dollar which only shrank the design so as it would fit on the back of the new coin.

The first Susan B. Anthony Dollar was minted in December 1978 but was dated 1979, which was not new in the US coinage. More than 500 million Susan B. Anthony Dollar was stockpiled until these were released on July 2, 1979. Coin collectors hurriedly came to the banks to get themselves a roll or two of the new coin while the public made it clear of their lack of interest on the Susan B. Anthony Dollar coin, while others repulsed it.

As predicted, the new Susan B. Anthony Dollar coin was mistaken for the quarter dollar since both have the same composition and were about the same size. Because of the confusion that the new dollar coin had brought to the public commerce, it was given nicknames that no one would want for themselves – the public names the Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coin as the “Carter Quarter” or the “Susan B. Agony.”

The government tried to make amends and promote the familiarization of the public with the Susan B. Anthony Dollar. The used advertising campaigns and a large-scale media coverage to try and educate the public about the coin’s advantages over the dollar bill. However, the public made it clear that they are not interested in the new coin. The fact that the production of the later never ceased only made matters worse. It should have been a “lesson-learned moment” for the Congress that was overlooked when another batch of millions of Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins were minted in the year

Despite extensive media coverage and a government advertising campaign to familiarize Americans with the new coin’s advantages over the paper dollar, the public clearly preferred the latter. The failure to discontinue printing one-dollar notes in connection with the introduction of the new dollar coins only facilitated the coin’s rejection. This was a lesson that other nations were to profit from when introducing their own dollar coins, but it was one that Congress failed to comprehend when yet another issue of dollar coins debuted in 2000.

Millions of the Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins were minted in three US Mints in 1980 – The Philadelphia Mint, Denver Mint, and the San Francisco Mint even after the backlash it received from the public. Most of the coins produced never saw the light outside of the vaults, and in 1981, the US Mint only coined enough Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins for collectors that year. After that, the production was finally suspended.

The US Postal Service had its vending machines dispense the Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins as well as some transit systems. For a short period of time, these were also used to pay military personnel who were posted in Europe, who, after some time complained that local merchants would only allow the use of such coins for a discounted price.

In 1999, millions of Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins were issued to which the public used them as a form of a novelty item. Some were hoarded by coin enthusiast and collectors, some were dispensed from vending machines of the US Postal Service while some were believed to be in vaults.

Detailed Specifications of the Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins

Image courtesy of , 1981-S SBA$ Type Two Deep Cameo, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY 4.0

The Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins were minted from 1978-1980 but were issued in 1979-1981 and then again in 1999. Coins struck in 1978 were date 1979 and there was no Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins dated 1978. These were designed by Frank Gasparro. It has a reeded edge, weighs approximately 8.10 grams is a 26.50mm in diameter. It is made up of 75% Copper, and 25% Nickel over a pure Copper center.

The Obverse

Image courtesy of , 1981-S SBA obverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY 4.0

The obverse features a profile bust of Susan B. Anthony facing right, the word LIBERTY on top of her, thirteen stars on the left and right side of the coin, the inscription IN GOD WE TRUST located at the right side of the coin near Anthony’s chin and the date below her portrait. Gasparro’s initials, FG can be seen above a star near the date the mintmark where the coin was minted on the left side of the obverse, on Anthony’s right shoulder. The Mintmark P is for coins minted in Philadelphia, D for Denver and S for San Francisco Mint.

The Reverse

United States Mint, 1999 SBA Rev P, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

For the reverse, an Eagle is seen descending on the surface of the moon, with the logo of Apollo XI being featured. The Eagle is clutching an olive branch with its talons and an arc consisting of thirteen stars surrounds it. The motto E PLURIBUS UNUM is on top of the eagle right below some stars and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA above the row of stars. The denomination ONE DOLLAR is written below while Gasparros’ initials (FG) are under the eagle’s tail.

Regular Strikes of the Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coins according to the PCGS Coin Facts

1979-P Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are 360,222,000 at the Philadelphia Mint

1979-P Wide Rim Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are 360,222,000 at the Philadelphia Mint

1979-D Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are 360,222,000 at the Denver Mint

1979-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are 109,576,000 at the San Francisco Mint

1980-P Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are 27,610,000 at the Philadelphia Mint

1980-D Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 41,628,708 the Denver Mint

1980-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 20,422,000 the Philadelphia Mint

1981-P Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 3,000,000 the Philadelphia Mint

1981-D Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 3,250,000 the Denver Mint

1981-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 3,492,000 the San Fernando Mint

1999-P Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 29,592,000 the Philadelphia Mint

1999-D Susan B. Anthony Dollar    

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 11,776,000 the Denver Mint

Proofs

1979-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar Type 1 Deep Cameo (Proof)

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 3,677,175 the San Francisco Mint

1979-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar Type 2 Deep Cameo (Proof)

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 3,677,175 the San Francisco Mint

1980-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar (Proof)

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 3,554,806 the San Francisco Mint

1981-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar Type 1 Deep Cameo (Proof)

  •    Total number of coins produced are at the San Francisco Mint

1981-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar Type 2 Deep Cameo (Proof)

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 4,063,083 the San Francisco Mint

1999-P Susan B. Anthony Dollar Deep Cameo (Proof)

  •    Total number of coins produced are at 740,000 the Philadelphia Mint

Collecting Susan B. Anthony Dollars

The Susan B. Anthony Dollar collection is a short and easy to collect series thanks to high mintages of coins. The Proof strikes are the ones most sought after by collectors which are readily available in the highest grades.

Some of the rarities and varieties of the Susan B. Anthony Dollar is the following:

1979-P Wide Rim Susan B. Anthony Dollar – Near Date

This error can be easily determined with the date hanging close to the rim compared to the previous issue.

1979-P Narrow Rim Susan B. Anthony Dollar – Far Date

This variety of the 1979-P has a thinner rim and the date is offset further than the 1979-P Wide Rim.

1979-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar Type 1 Deep Cameo (Proof) – Blob Mint Mark

Because of the old punch used to strike the coin, the mintmark in this variety looks more like a blob mark that the actual mintmark.

1979-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar Type 2 Deep Cameo (Proof) – Clear Mintmark

The punch was replaced, and the mintmark S can now be clearly seen. This variety is more common than its Type 1 counterpart.

1981-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar Type 1 Deep Cameo (Proof) – Clear Mint Mark

In 1981, the punch used was the one used to create the type 2 1979-S Proof which resulted in a similar mintmark.

1981-S Susan B. Anthony Dollar Type 2 Deep Cameo (Proof) – Flat mint Mark

The mintmark is clearer and has a flat S with a bulbous shape.

One can buy a Susan B. Anthony Dollar for as low as $1 up to $7,500.00. for the price guide set by PCGS-graded Susan B. Anthony Dollars, you can check this link.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGCCoin, US Mint, Susan B. Anthony House, The Spruce Craft

The Peace Dollars

The Peace Dollar was known to be the last Silver Dollar Coin of the United States to be minted for circulation and used as a legal tender. These were struck and minted from 1921-1928, but because there were changes in legislation, the Peace Silver Dollar was again minted for another two years in 1934-1935.

This beautiful Silver Dollar Coin serves to commemorate the victory of the United States in the World War 1. The Peace Silver Dollar was proposed, created and minted as a replacement for the Morgan Silver Dollar Coin on the same year that the latter was discontinued.

One can attest that Peace Silver Dollars are the type of Silver Coins that are very rare due to their limited number. The fact that this Silver Dollar Coins were produced in the shortest amount of time and had the most unconventional mintage period in the history of a currency of the United States makes them a valuable find.

Another reason why the Peace Silver Dollars remain popular among coin collectors is that it serves to be one of the only silver currencies left, not to mention the last genuine silver dollar coin ever minted.

The Historical Background of the Peace Silver Dollar Coin

The Peace Silver Dollar Coin stands proudly for being the only coin ever struck that was created and minted with the active participation of numismatists. To better understand how the famous coin came to be one of the most sought-after coins by collectors, there are events that need special mentioning.

The Pittman Act of 1918

On April 23, 1918, a Democratic senator from Nevada, Senator Key Pittman passed the bill that aims to authorize the US Department of Treasury to melt and convert a total of 350 million of standard Silver Dollar Coins into silver bullion. The US sold the melted Silver to Britain, then replaced the melted Silver Dollar coins by purchasing newly mined Silvers.

The Pittman Act of 1918 was created to financially assist the Great War in Europe. Since wars are costly because of the many finances and expenditures, there was an insufficient supply of Gold. However, the United States had lots of Silver Dollars in circulation and the fact that there was an overflow of silver thanks to the Comstock Lode made it possible for the US to help Britain.

The Germans spread nasty rumors that targeted Great Britain in 1918. They claimed that Great Britain can no longer back up their British Silver Certificates, and it proved to work in favor of the Germans. India experienced a direct hit and resulted in a monetary crisis. The British then sought the help of the US by attempting to buy silver bullions. And since the US is an ally of Greta Britain, they passed the bill now known as the Pittman Act of 1918.

The Pittman Act of 1918 paved way into melting a huge amount of Silver Dollar Coins which were mostly Morgan Silver Dollars. The melted silver was sold to Great Britain as Silver Bullion, and now the US needs a new Silver Dollar Coin to compensate for the lost Morgan Silver Dollar Coins.

To say mining companies were thrilled was an understatement. Because every Silver Coin melted needs to be replaced with a new one from newly mined Silver, this resulted in an immediate and massive need for Silver. This event was known as “The 19th Century Silver Rush”, and because silver can be shoveled literally from the ground on Nevada, it was called the Silver State. Each newly mined silver was purchased by the US Department of Treasury at $1 per troy ounce no matter what the current price of Silver is in the international market.

The Suggestion of the Peace Silver Dollar Coin

Frank Duffield, a coin expert, issued an article that was published in The Numismatist in November 1918. In the said article, he suggested that a new coin needs to be created in order to commemorate the victory of the US during the World War 1.

Two years later, Farran Zerbe, another coin expert made a suggestion that was similar to Duffield’s. Zerbe stated that a new commemorative coin is in order to celebrate peace. His reason was simple – since the US gave up its Silver to aid Britain, a new coin must be minted to celebrate the victory and peace.

The American Numismatic Association then began persuading the government and US Mints to produce the Peace Silver Dollar Coin, and although hearings were held in late 1920 and early 1921, no action was made to create the suggested commemorative coin. After some time, the advocates of the peace commemorative coin decided a Congress hearing was not necessary. With the new Pittman Act, the Peace Coin can easily replace the Morgan Silver Dollar Coin.

The Making of the design of the Peace Silver Dollar Coin

A US Commission of Fine Arts member, James Earle Fraser sent out personal letters to a list of people who were selected to submit their designs for the new Peace Silver Dollar Coin in November 1921. Some of the people who received an invitation to enter the contest were Adolph Weinman, Anthony de Francisci, Chester Beach, Henry Hering, Herman MacNeil, John Flanagan and Victor Brenner. George Morgan, the current Chief Engraver at the United States Mint and designer of the Morgan Silver Dollar Coin was requested by Raymond Baker – the Mint Director at that time, to submit his design for the new Peace Silver Dollar Coin to which he obliged. A man that was only known as Mr. Folio also submitted an unsolicited design for the new coin.

The recipients were given less than a month to submit their designs which included the words LIBERTY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, In God We Trust and E Pluribus Unum as well as the One Dollar denomination. The head of Miss Liberty will appear on the obverse of the coin and needs to be portrayed in a beautiful and full of character manner. As for the reverse side of the Peace Silver Dollar Coin, an Eagle needs to be featured in accordance with the Coinage Act of 1792.

After careful assessment, a 34-year-old engraver named Anthony de Francisci won by a unanimous decision. The other participants received $100 each while de Francisci received $1,500. De Francisci made a few changes upon the request of Director Baker before it was presented to President Harding. Upon examination, President Harding requested to remove a small dot found on Miss Liberty’s Face as it looked like an inappropriate dimple. De Francisci explained that the dot was more of an artistic touch rather than a dimple. However, Harding claims the dimple on Miss Liberty’s chin does not express peace. The final design of the new peace coin was finally produced after adjustments were made.

The Controversies that Surrounded the Peace Silver Dollar Coin

During a Mint press release of the Peace Silver Dollar, controversy struck almost immediately. Some have described the reverse side of the coin to have “a large figure of an eagle perched on a broken sword.”

New York Herald, a very influential newspaper during the time the Peace Silver Dollar was issued became an advocate against the broken sword. The newspaper claimed a broken sword signifies surrender and defeat. Because of Herald’s influence and many agreed on the allegation, the Mint had de Francisci remove the broken sword from the design.

The problem is, the Peace Silver Dollar Coin had a tight schedule and cannot afford to delay the production. Also, the coin hub was already created, which meant the Mint had to physically remove the sword from the coin hub itself. But thanks George Morgan’s expertise, he was able to remove the unwanted broken sword using very fine engraving tools and extreme magnification. He, however, faced a difficult challenge since he had to create a detailed background to make the changes possible. Nonetheless, he proved his expertise when the Peace Silver Dollar Coin was issued, and the public failed to realize that the coin was altered too late during the production.

If there is one aspect that was not criticized and was actually applauded by the critics, it was de Francisci’s depiction of Miss Liberty. Reports have been made that both the public and the critics agreed that de Francisci’s Miss Liberty is the best portrait among all other coins ever minted in the history of US coinage. A Philadelphia newspaper even once wrote that “Miss Liberty had never looked better,” which, for sure gratified the de Francisci couple.

With only four days left before 1921 comes to an end, the new Peace Silver Dollar Coins were minted. The US Mint claims they were able to create more than a million Peace Silver Dollar coins, but many thought it was impossible since the Mint only have less than a week to mint those many coins in 1921. Because of this, historians believe that most of the 1921 Peace Silver dollar Coins were actually minted in early 1922.

The Peace Silver Dollar Coin faced another controversy after the dies used to mint them kept breaking, and it’s only been two weeks since the production started. One issue was that the new Silver Coin was a very high-relief coin, which meant great pressure is needed to make sure the deep design is minted. De Francisci finally agreed to reduce the relief after this and the Mint official’s effort to resolve the problem without altering the design came to a dead end.

De Francisci used a Janvier Pantograph-Late to reduce the size of the Peace Silver Dollar Coin by preparing plaster models that he revised himself. However, since no one in the US Mint was an expert when it comes to operating the complicated machinery, experts believe the end product which was a low-relief Peace Silver Dollar could have looked better with an experienced Janvier Pantograph-Late operator.

The Use and Production of the Peace Silver Dollar Coin

Much like the Morgan Silver Dollar Coins, the new silver Coin was famous among people living in the Western US. However, ever since the production and release of dollar bills, more people believed that such big, bulky and heavy Silver Coins were not convenient. As a result, most Peace Silver Dollar Coins stayed in vaults.

The first Peace Dollars minted were produced in the Philadelphia Mint during the last week of December 1921 and were issued January of the following year.

The Peace Silver Dollar Coin was minted and issued yearly from December 28, 1921, up until 1928, when the Silver secured from the Pittman Act of 1918 ran out. The Peace Dollar made a comeback after a short-term Act passed by the Congress required the buying of Silver in 1934. By the year 1936, no Peace Silver Dollar Coins were minted, so Mint Officials made the big decision of getting rid of the master dies used in producing the coins.

1964 came and the Congress yet again passed a new legislation that paved the way for the production of new Silver Dollar Coins in the Mint in the West. Mint officials were able to recover a couple of the dies used in the production of the Peace Silver Dollar coin, but these were not in great shape, so new dies were necessary to aid the production. 45 million Silver Dollar Coins were produced.

The Peace Dollars produced in 1964 were called “Trial Strikes.” There was an uproar that resulted in the new Peace Silver Dollar Coin that would not really benefit the US was announced in 1965 in the month of May. Coin dealers took advantage of this and immediately bought each coin for $7.50 mainly because of their high silver content.

Consequently, the newly minted 1964 Peace Silver Dollar coins never made it to the circulation. The US Mint had to organize a press release in order to simmer down the controversy. They claimed that the new Peace Silver Dollar Coins were never minted for circulation – that the 300,000 coins were meant to be “trial strikes.” This is the reason why the new Peace Dollar was also called Peace Silver Dollar “Trial Strikes” Coin.

A New Congressional Act of 1965 forbade the production of Peace Dollars for at least five years, and the 1964 Peace Silver Dollar “Trial Strikes” Coins were melted down. As of today, there is no known new Peace Dollar to exist.

The Peace Silver Dollar Coin Specifications

The Peace Silver Dollar Coins were minted in three US Mints – Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco. The mintage dates for this Silver Dollar Coin are dated 1921-1935. No Peace Silver Dollar Coin was minted from 1929 to 1933.

The Mint Marks for the coins minted are coded as “D” for those produced in Denver and S for those produced in San Francisco. Coins minted in Philadelphia bears no Mint Mark. One can easily find the Mint Mark on the reverse side of the coin – just below the “ONE” in ONE DOLLAR and just above the tail of the Eagle.

The Peace Silver Dollar Coin is composed of 90% Silver and 10% Copper. It weighs about 26.73 grams and the actual weight of Silver found on the Peace Silver Dollar Coin weights about 0.7734 Troy Ounces of Silver. It is about 38.10mmin diameter and 2.40mm thick, and the edges are reeded. It is important to note that the Peace Silver Dollar Coins minted in 1921 were produced to have a higher relief that the succeeding issues.

The Obverse

PAR at English Wikipedia, Peace dollar, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Anthony De Francisci was the designer of both the obverse and reverse side of the Peace Silver Dollar Coin. For the obverse, he features the head of Miss Liberty facing left, who was wearing a diadem of spikes. The word LIBERTY has engraved above while the date was situated below Miss Liberty. The words IN GOD WE TRUST were situated near Miss Liberty’s neck – with IN GOD WE located on her neck, and the word TRUST on her nape.

A fun fact about de Francisci’s design was the model he used as Miss Liberty. He had asked his wife, Teresa de Francisci to pose as Miss Liberty and that’s where he based his obverse design for the Peace Silver Dollar Coin. According to the newlywed engraver, he wanted to portray a Miss Liberty that was different from the Morgan Dollar. He wanted her to look more youthful, and reflect a sense of vitality.

The Reverse

Photo taken by user bobby131313 and may be used freely with following credit. Image courtesy of CCF Numismatics, Peace dollar reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

For the reverse, Anthony de Francisci featured a proud Eagle that was perched on a rock and was clutching on a Laurel branch. The word PEACE is inscribed below the Eagle, while the words the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM are engraved above the Eagle in the form of an arc. The word ONE can be seen near the Eagle’s tail while the word Dollar is situated on the opposite side of ONE.

Peace Silver Dollar Coins By Date, Mintage Rates, and Mint

The 1921 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 1,006,470 pieces produced.

Note: Fully struck Peace Dollar coins minted in 1921 always have a high premium, are considered very rare, all are high-rise relief and have 10 or fewer proof mintage in matte proof.

The 1922 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 35,401 pieces produced.

Note: The regular-relief 1922 Peace Dollar in higher grades or condition is slightly scarcer than those minted in 1923, 1924 and 1925. The high-relief 1922 Peace Dollar is the rarest among all major varieties of the Peace Dollar.

The 1922-D Peace Dollar – Minted in Denver with 15,063,000 pieces produced.

Note: Many 1922-D Peace Dollars exists in bags. There was even a hoard of 50 bags found in the 1990s

The 1922-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 17,475,000 pieces produced.

Note: One can easily find a 1922-S Peace Dollar in all conditions except high grades and those that are well-struck in the Mint

The 1923 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 30,800,000 pieces produced.

Note: If you’re looking for the most common Peace Dollar, look for the 1923 Peace Silver Dollar Coin.

The 1923-D Peace Dollar – Minted in Denver with 6,811,000 pieces produced.

Note: Most 1923-D Peace Dollars found in mint state conditions have heavy bag marks, while high-grade one that is well-struck are hard to find.

The 1923-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 19,020,000 pieces produced.

Note: The 1923-S Peace Dollar is very commonly found in low mint condition and is almost always struck poorly. Those in MS-65 grade and higher have a great rarity.

The 1924 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 11,811,000 pieces produced.

Note: The 1924 Peace Dollar, together with those issued in the years 1922, 1923 and 1925 are the most common issues. However, the 1924 Peace Dollar found in mint condition are harder to find that the three.

The 1924-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 1,728,000 pieces produced.

Note: Most 1924-S Peace Dollars in mint condition have bag marks.

The 1925 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 10,198,000 pieces produced.

Note: The 1925 Peace Dollar, together with those issued in the years 1922, 1923 and 1924 are the most common issues. However, the 1925 Peace Dollar has the most number of Peace Silver Dollar Coins to have a higher mint condition.

The 1925-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 1,610,000 pieces produced.

Note: Most 1925-S Peace Dollars have extensive contact marks, are struck lightly or both.

The 1926 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 1,939,000 pieces produced.

Note: Most 1926 Peace Dollars in Mint state have very attractive surface areas

The 1926-D Peace Dollar – Minted in Denver with 2,348,700 pieces produced.

Note: Lustrous and good grade 1926-D Peace Dollar are fairly easy to find

The 1926-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 6,980,000 pieces produced.

Note: The 1926-S Peace Dollar is one of the more available peace dollars issued in uncirculated grade.

The 1927 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 848,000 pieces produced.

Note: The 1927 Peace Dollar in the mint state usually are struck well in Philadelphia, and have very attractive appearances.

The 1927-D Peace Dollar – Minted in Denver with 1,268,900 pieces produced.

The 1927-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 866,000 pieces produced.

Note: One will find it hard to find a 1927-S Peace Dollar MS-65 condition, but are readily available in the lower mint state.

The 1928 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 360,649 pieces produced.

Note: It has the lowest number of minted Peace Dollars from 1921-1935.

The 1928-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 1,632,000 pieces produced.

Note: One will find it hard to find a 1928-S Peace Dollar MS-65 condition, but are readily available in the low mint state.

The 1934 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 954,057 pieces produced.

Note: The 1934 Peace Dollar is, for some reason, unappreciated in the market even though they are readily available in mint condition.

The 1934-D Peace Dollar – Minted in Denver with 1,569,500 pieces produced.

Note: The 1934-D Peace Dollar is known to be the second rarest minted in Denver in mint state, and is the rarest minted in Denver in MS-65 grade.

The 1934-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 1,011,000 pieces produced.

Note: If you’re looking for the key Peace Dollar ever issued in Mint state, the 1924-S Peace Dollar is what you seek.

The 1935 Peace Dollar – Minted in Philadelphia with 1,576,000 pieces produced.

Note: Those 1935 Peace Dollar in mint state are usually well-struck and have a beautiful silky luster.

The 1935-S Peace Dollar – Minted in San Francisco with 1,964,000 pieces produced.

Note: Most 1935-S Peace Dollars we have today are well-struck, have a very attractive appearance and have silky luster. There are many of these babies around that everyone can have own one.

The 1964-D Peace Dollar – Minted in Denver with 316,076 pieces produced.

Note: Struck in 1965, no 1964-D Peace Dollars were ever released to the public. All were supposedly destroyed by melting, and not a single piece was spared as a token for the National Coin Collection. However, there were reports that some lucky collectors indeed have a 1964-D Peace Dollar as their most prized Peace Dollar.

Collecting Peace Silver Dollar Coins

In collecting Silver coins, larger coins do contain a higher amount of silver. Starting with a Peace Dollar is a great way to kick-start your silver coin collection. For one, you only need 24 combinations of all Peace Silver Dollar Coins to complete the collection.

Historically speaking, the value of Peace Silver Dollar Coin increases every year. Most Peace Dollars are only worth their Silver content especially those with well-worn appearances. If you have Peace Silver Dollar Coins and want to make money by selling your collection, it is important to note that if the date you plan on selling them has a relatively high silver price, expect to receive only the amount of your coins’ silver content.

The market for Silver is continuously expanding, and for coin collectors and enthusiast, this is definitely a great news, especially for those who have Silver Dollar Coins with a high Silver content. Even though the Peace Silver Dollar Coin were struck for only a few years, the series is still popular among coin collectors because it has its fair share of rarities and varieties.

When purchasing or selling Peace Silver Dollar Coins from coin dealers, the price value of circulated and uncirculated coins have a huge difference. The offer you will receive from the coin dealer or the price of that the coin dealer will offer you in exchange for your silver coin will depend on some factors like the following:

  • The condition or grade of the coin
  • The demand for that particular coin
  • The surviving number of coins
  • The intrinsic metal melt value of the coin
  • The amount of inventory that a dealer currently has

A complete collection of the Peace Silver Dollar Coins will consist of 24 different issues. Your collection must have all Peace dollars minted from the three US Mints (Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco) and should have dates from 1921-1935.

It is important to remember that Peace Silver Dollar Coins were either well struck or not, circulated or uncirculated and that some have were struck using worn-out or deteriorating dies which altered the appearance of the coin. Some have a grainy appearance, some have metal blobs while others have cracks on one side of the coin. Also, the 1921 series were all high-rise Peace Silver Dollar Coins. The 1922 Peace Dollars also have a high-relief business strike, and the rest are low-rise coins.

All mint marks of coins can easily be distinguished with a D for Coins minted in Denver, S in San Francisco while those minted in Philadelphia bears no mint mark. If you’re looking forward to collecting Peace Silver Dollar Coins in Key dates, look for Peace Dollars in circulated grades minted in Philadelphia with the year dated in 1928. Another key date to look for is the uncirculated Peace Dollars struck in San Francisco in the year 1934.

There were some people who took advantage of the Peace Dollar’s popularity by altering some the coins to make them look like the rare series. For example, mint marks were removed from a certain coin collection in order to trick collectors into thinking they got a more valuable coin, but the truth is, these have lower prices. If you plan to start your coin collection, be aware of such tactics.

Peace Silver Dollar Coins Collecting Guide

If you’re just beginning to collect coins and have made up your mind about collecting the Peace Dollars, it is best to start your journey by knowing which ones you need to collect first. For beginners with low budgets, it is best to buy Peace Silver Dollar coins minted in the Philadelphia Mint from 1922 to 1925.

Why? The reason is simple. 1922, 1923, 1924 and 1925 Peace Dollars are easy to obtain, costs less than other series and are readily available in good and higher grades. 1922, 1923, 1924 and 1925 Peace Dollars issued by the Philadelphia Mint are the four of the most common Peace Silver Dollar Coins. However, it is said that the 1924 Peace Dollar in Mint State is the scarcest among the group.

Once you’re done collecting the series, you can now move your up by collecting Peace Silver Dollar Coins that costs more than your first collection, and once you’re ready, go for the rare ones which can actually cost a lot.

However, if you’re one of the more adventurous ones, you can start collecting Peace Silver Dollar coins on from 1934-S and the like. Different coin collectors have different views, opinions, and ways of collecting coins. Note that there is really no right or wrong or even a standard way of coin collecting. It all depends on your budget, time and effort, luck and way of searching.

When it comes to rarity, coin collectors will agree that the traditional rarity of Peace Silver Dollar Coins will be the ones issued in 1928 in the Philadelphia Mint. With only 360,649 coins issued, its scarcity makes it one of the most expensive Peace Dollar even in a worn out condition. However, there are other Peace Dollar Coins that were able to pass this series when it comes to uncirculated values in high levels.

There are a number of Peace Dollars in Satin Finnish, Matte Proof and other proofs in special striking that collectors need to be wary of. Some of these are considered phony even if they have authentication proofs or letters from experts.

Top 7 Most Valuable Peace Silver Dollar Coins

For coin collectors who are serious when it comes to Peace Silver Dollar Coins, these are the 6 coins deemed valuable among the other series.

  1. The 1921 Peace Dollar (Philadelphia Mint)

The very first batch of Peace Silver Dollar Coins ever minted on December 26, 1921, in the US Mint located in Philadelphia. The 1921 Peace Dollar was struck with a very high-relief. The production proved to be difficult and the succeeding coins were minted as low-relief coins. This resulted in the 1921 Peace Dollar as the only issued Peace Silver Dollar Coin with a very high-relief.

The mint rate for this series may be low but can easily be collected in grades up to MS-64. The total mintage rate of the 1921 Peace Dollar was 1,006,470. It bears no mint mark as these were minted in the Philadelphia Mint.

  1. The 1922 Peace Dollar (Philadelphia Mint – Die Break in Reverse Field)

Mint workers in Philadelphia failed to recognize that one of the dies used was a deteriorating die. As a result, the reverse side of the coin sported a blob of metal found just above the word DOLLAR and just below the Eagle. Because of this error, this series was included among the top VAM varieties of Peace Dollars.

  1. The 1922 Peace Dollar (Philadelphia Mint – Die Break at Ear)

This time, mint workers in the Philadelphia Mint failed to check that the obverse die was deteriorating which caused a crack in Miss Liberty’s hair just behind her ear. Coin collectors call this variety as the “Ear Ring” as it can easily be recognized thanks to the metal protrusion that cuts on Miss Liberty’s ear, running down to her neck.

  1. The 1928 Peace Dollar (Philadelphia Mint)

The Great Britain Depression took a toll on the economy of the United States. This resulted in a lack of coin demand. Consequently, this series has the lowest number of Peace Silver Dollar Coin struck – only 360,649 were coined during 1928. From 1929 to 1933, no Silver Dollar Coins were minted. Some Peace Silver Dollar Coins minted in San Francisco were altered to look like they were from Philadelphia. The Mint Mark S was removed. Coin collectors must be wary of such coins as they have a much lower value.

  1. The 1934-D Peace Dollar (Denver Mint – Doubled Die Obverse)

The demand for coins started to rise as no coins were stuck from 1929-1933. With the pent-up demand, The Mint in Denver started to strike double die obverse Peace Silver Dollar Coins. The D in GOD and W in We are doubled. Not only that, but the rays of the sun found on the right side of the coin and Miss Liberty’s profile are also doubled. The total number of Peace Silver Dollar coins with Doubled-Die Obverse remains a mystery, but one thing is for sure. These die series are sought after by expert coin collectors rather aggressively, which speaks volumes for itself.

It is also important to note that the 1934-D Peace Dollar is the rarest Peace dollar minted in Denver in MS-65.

  1. The 1934-S Peace Dollar (San Francisco Mint – Doubled Die Obverse)

This Peace Silver Dollar Coin ranks fourth when it comes to the series with the lowest coin mintage. Uncirculated versions of this specific Peace Dollar proves to be a challenge because of a low mintage rate. This resulted in some forgeries wherein coins struck at the San Francisco Mints by having their mint mark removed while adding this to a 1934 Peace Silver Dollar Coin minted in Philadephia. If you’re one of the lucky ones who happen to come across this 1934-S Peace Dollar with a Doubled Die Obverse, have it checked by an authentic grading service.

  1. The 1964-D Peace Dollar (Denver Mint)

If you want the most controversial Peace Silver Dollar Coin, then the 1964-D Peace Dollar is what you’re looking for. Among all modern issues, this is the most famous of them all. This series is very special to the point where PCGS or the Professional Coin Grading System is offering a whopping $10,000 to anyone who shows them an authentic 1964-D Peace Dollar and has it authenticated. The reason is fairly simple yet striking – all 316, 076 Peace Silver Dollar Coins struck in the Denver Mint in the year 1964 were all supposedly destroyed and were never released for circulation.

Prices of the Peace Silver Dollar Coins

One can buy Peace Silver Dollar Coins starting at $24 for the most common varieties while the rarest one, the high-relief 1922 Peace Dollar, are sold by dealers as high as $400,000 in Matte Finish.

For a price guide of the Ike Dollars, you may check the list on PCGS here.

In conclusion, there will be instances when a Peace Silver Dollar can be very rare in terms of grade and demand. It is best to use your gut feel, common sense and a lot of research when collecting Peace Dollars. There are lots of useful and informative resource you can use to help you in collecting your very own Peace Silver Dollar Coins.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGCCoin, The Spruce Crafts, PeaceDollars

Featured Image Source: PAR at English WikipediaPeace dollar, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Morgan Silver Dollar

This particular silver dollar coin has a colorful history and lots of controversies but is still a momentous United States Silver Dollar Coin, nonetheless. It was a beautiful coin that features one side of the Statue of Liberty’s Face, and the famous proud Eagle holding arrows and an olive branch using its claws. The silver dollar coin was named after George T. Morgan, the coin’s designer from England. They were coined from 1878-1904, and then in 1921.

The History of the Morgan Silver Dollar

The Coin Act Of 1873

It was the first coin to be approved by the Congress and minted or produced after the Coin Act Of 1873. Also dubbed as the Mint Act of 1873, the Coin Act of 1873 was signed by the late President Ulysses S. Grant on February 12, 1873. It omitted the Silver Dollar Coin while adopting the Gold standard.

To say this Act was extremely controversial in an understatement. For one, many people can no longer use their silver dollar coins as payment for goods and services. Before the Coin Act of 1873, both silver and gold were used as comparison points and can be used as an everyday currency for trade. However, once the Act was signed, only the Gold ones can be used, hence the reason why many called it the Crime of 1873.

The people in the US were not the only ones affected by the Crime of 1873. European countries also shifted from Silver to Gold, thus resulting in a very low in demand for Silver worldwide. Because there was a high and great supply of Silver produced by the Comstock Lode but no orders were made, silver mining companies greatly suffered.

Debtors, most especially farmers were critically hit by this Act, so they made a big decision to address this problem. The South and West made an allegiance to advocate for “free silver.” However, monometallists, especially the Northeast together with their supporters in the Congress are against “free silver.” They strongly believe that a conservative money regime using Gold as the primary legal tender will work best for the US economy.

Bland-Allison Act of 1878

When the Bland-Allison Act of 1878 or the Grand Bland Plan of 1878 was approved on February 28, 1878, it proved to be a victory for the South and West Allegiance. However, the Act was a compromised one. Congressman Richard P. Bland of Missouri passed a bill that included “free silver coinage” but when it reached the Senate, Senator William B. Allison promptly removed the provision. It did, however, granted and required the US Department of Treasury to purchase between 2 million to 4 million worth of silver that will then be converted into silver dollar coins.

When the Director of the U.S. Mint at that time, Henry Linderman, learned about the sudden demand for a new silver dollar coin, he staged a contest for the design. He had William and Charles Barber compete with George T. Morgan. The two Barbers were a father and son duo who have been working in the Philadelphia Mint for many years now while young Morgan was a new engraver Lindermann hired from England.

Now, both Morgan and the Barbers had the Liberty head as an inspiration for their designs, but Morgan proved to have used a better concept which led to his design being the winning entry. It soon became known as the Liberty Head Dollar, most commonly known as the Morgan Silver Dollar.

Morgan was quite the artist and a remarkable one at that. As instructed by Lindermann, only the head of Miss Liberty will be featured in the design instead of the full figure. He had used a school teacher named Anna Willess Williams as his perfect model for Miss Liberty. Using the left side of Miss Liberty’s portrait, the obverse or design of the head of the came to life.

As for the reverse or back side of the Morgan Silver Dollar Coin, critics called the depiction of the Eagle as a scrawny bird. Morgan was able to make history when he used his initial “M” on both sides of the coin. The “M” for Morgan on the obverse side of the coin can be seen on the truncation of Miss Liberty’s neck while his initial sits proudly on the left loop of the ribbon. On the wreath of the coins’ reverse, the mint mark can be found. One of the letters O, S, D or CC can be seen to depict which US mint the coin was produced.

The Morgan Silver Dollar Coins were first minted in the year 1878, but the legendary silver dollar faced yet again another controversy not long after they were issued to the public. Some experts claimed that the number of tail feathers that the Eagle has on the reverse side of the coin was wrong. The mint was advised that Eagles usually have feathers on their tail in Odd numbers, not Even numbers. The Morgan Dollar Coin had 8 tail feathers and was soon replaced with only 7.

The relief, also known as the high points or raised design of the coin did not go unnoticed as this too failed to pass the critics eyes. They say that the edges were not as sharp as they should be. Consequently, Linderman ordered all coins to have only 7 tail feathers, and as a result, some 1878 Morgan Silver Dollar Coins have either 7, 8 or even a combination of 7 and 8 feathered tails. The 7 over 8 feathers became quite popular among collectors. All three designs maybe fairly common during the past, but the 7 over 8 design was the scarcest of them all.

Even after the second batch of minted coins, a third batch was minted in late 1878. A few variations were included in the design such as a sharper relief, the Eagle’s breast was minted with additional details and it had a noticeably different fletching than the first two batches.

The five US Mints that produced the Morgan Silver Dollar Coin and whose initials bear their marks in this beautiful coin are in Philadelphia, San Francisco, Denver, New Orleans and Carson City – with Philadelphia being the main US Mint. They coined the Morgan Dollar from 1878-1904. However, the Carson City Mint’s production was short lived as this US Mint was closed down in the year 1893. It’s sufficed to say this mint was only able to produce a much lower amount of coins. After 1904, the US Mints used to coin the Morgan Silver Dollar were discarded with the belief that the coining of big and bulky coin dollars are no longer needed.

All things changed 18 years later. In 1921, the production of the Morgan Silver Dollar returned after the Pittman Act was passed in the Congress. The said Act had required a massive amount of Morgan Silver Coins to be minted – a total of 86 million examples. This caused problems as 270 million older Morgan Silver Dollars were already melted and replaced by the Peace Dollar by the end of 1921.

Approximately 657 million pieces of Morgan Silver Dollar Coins were minted. Hundreds of thousands of Silver Coins were melted due to different reasons, but mostly because there were collectors who have been using the coin, not as a means of currency, but because some have in fact used them for profit as the price for Silver continued to rise.

However, Americans have a largely fair amount of circulated (coins used as money and has evidences of wear) Morgan Silver Dollars used by the public which led to thousands of coins left in the US Banks and Treasury worldwide. This is the main reason why despite everything that this beautiful silver coin has been through, there are still many nowadays that are in mint condition – some did not even get the chance to leave the vaults or banks, nor were they able to experience being used in public.

The Morgan Silver Dollar was not a big hit among collectors but all changed when 1960’s arrived. Before, since many were able to get a hold of these silver coins, collectors paid more attention to coins with a lower face value. They may have access to banks or the US Treasury Office, yet that was not enough reason for them to treasure the Morgan Silver Dollar.

All things changed when news broke out that a certain Cash Room of the US Treasury Department was paying a hefty amount of money for uncirculated versions (coins that never made their way into the hand of the public as everyday money) of these silver coins. The Uncirculated Carson City minted Morgan Silver Dollars reached up about five US dollars. Dealers took their chance and crept their way in. From 1940s-1950s, they went on exploiting their newfound discovery.

With the steady rise of Silver’s price, enthusiasts continued to work their way in taking advantage of Silver by asking for Silver Dollar Coin Certificates at the Treasury. They were able to make a fast yet a reasonable amount of profit up until 1964, and only 2.9 million were left. Most of the Morgan Silver coins were the scarce versions minted at Carson City which is why the government decided it would be best to keep them.

In 1969, a meeting commenced under the decision of the Joint Commission on Coinage to determine what the best way is to sell the Carson City Morgan Silver Dollar Coins that were held back five years ago. A decision was made that mail-bid are the best way to make money. The government, in turn, made a big profit out of this by dispersing a series of mail-bid sales while a new interest in Silver coin dollars was elicited. Approximately 107 million dollars were generated from the Carson City Morgan Silver Dollars from the seven series of mail-bids from 1972-1980.

The Morgan Silver Dollar yet again made a sweet comeback after more than 400,000 dollars were publicly cached from the home of LaVere Redfield – a Nevada Millionaire. A-Mark Coins of Los Angeles reigned supreme after bagging a bid of 7.3 million. For several years, many dealers worked their way into fostering the Morgan Silver Dollar. It proved to be a successful one as more collectors were enticed towards this silver coin instead of its popularity plummeting down.

In the year 2005, a legislation was passed on the 15th of June to commemorate the good old US Mint located in San Francisco. A silver dollar coin and a five dollars gold coin were minted for the purpose of rebuilding the San Francisco Mint by allocating the surcharges to the San Francisco Museum and Historical Society.

The design of the San Francisco Old Mint Commemorative Dollar Coin features a slightly modified and updated design on the reverse side of the coin, while the obverse proudly shows a left-frontal view of the S.F. US Mint.

Minting of Morgan Silver Dollars

One cannot be sure just how rare this historic silver coin is as the produced numbers are not that accurate. Because of the many issues and incidence of minting and melting Morgan Silver Dollars, the number of minted silver dollar coins can be quite misleading.

According to the NGC Coin Explorer, The following are the number of Morgan Silver Dollars minted in Regular Strike

1878 8 Tail Feathers Morgan Dollar Mint State – 749,500 from the Philadelphia Mint

1878 7/8 Tail Feathers STRONG Morgan Dollar Mint State – from the Philadelphia Mint

1878 7/8 Tail Feathers WEAK Morgan Dollar Mint State – from the Philadelphia Mint

1878 7 Tail Feathers REV OF 78 Morgan Dollar Mint State – from the Philadelphia Mint

1878 7 Tail Feathers REV OF 79 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,500,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1878 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,212,000 from the Carson City Mint

1878 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 9,774,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1879 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 14,806,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1879 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 756,000 from the Carson City Mint

1879 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,887,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1879 S REV OF 78 TOP-100 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 9,110,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1879 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 9,110,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1880 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 12,600,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1880 Carson City HITLIST-40 VAM-7 REV OF 78 Morgan Dollar Mint State – from the Carson City Mint

1880 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 495,000 from the Carson City Mint

1880 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 5,305,000 – from the New Orleans Mint

1880 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 8,900,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1881 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 12,760,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1881 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 296,000 from the Carson City Mint

1881 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 5,708,000 – from the New Orleans Mint

1881 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 12,760,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1882 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 11,100,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1882 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,133,000 from the Carson City Mint

1882 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 6,090,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1882 O/S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 6,090,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1882 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 9,250,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1883 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 12,290,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1883 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,204,000 from the Carson City Mint

1883 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 8,725,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1884 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 14,070,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1884 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,136,000 from the Carson City Mint

1884 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 9,730,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1884 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 3,200,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1885 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 17,787,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1885 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 228,000 from the Carson City Mint

1885 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 9,185,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1885 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,497,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1886 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 19,963,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1886 O Morgan Dollar Mint State -10,710,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1886 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 750,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1887 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 20,290,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1887/6 TOP-100 VAM-2 Morgan Dollar Mint State – from the New Orleans Mint

1887/6 O TOP-100 VAM-3 Morgan Dollar Mint State from the New Orleans Mint

1888 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 19,183,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1888 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 12,150,000 – from the New Orleans Mint

1888 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 657,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1889 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 21,726,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1889 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 350,000 from the Carson City Mint

1889 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 11,875,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1889 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 700,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1890 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,680,200 from the Philadelphia Mint

1890 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,309,041 from the Carson City Mint

1890 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 10,701,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1890 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 8,230,373 from the San Francisco Mint

1891 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 8,693,556 from the Philadelphia Mint

1891 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,618,000 from the Carson City Mint

1891 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 7,954,529 from the New Orleans Mint

1891 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 5,296,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1892 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,036,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1892 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,352,000 from the Carson City Mint

1892 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,744,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1892 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,200,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1893 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 378,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1893 Carson City Morgan Dollar Mint State – 677,000 from the Carson City Mint

1893 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 300,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1893 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 100,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1894 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 110,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1894 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,723,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1894 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,260,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1895 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 450,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1895 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 400,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1896 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 9,976,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1896 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 4,900,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1896 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 5,000,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1897 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,822,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1897 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 4,004,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1897 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 5,825,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1898 Morgan Dollar Mint State -5,884,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1898 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 4,440,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1898 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 4,102,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1899 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 330,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1899 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 12,290,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1899 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,562,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1900 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 8,830,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1900 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 12,590,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1900 O/Carson City TOP-100 Morgan Dollar Mint State – from the New Orleans Mint

1900 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 3,540,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1901 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 6,962,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1901 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 13,320,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1901 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,284,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1902 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 7,994,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1902 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,530,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1903 Morgan Dollar Mint State -4,652,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1903 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 4,450,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1903 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 1,241,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1904 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,788,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1904 O Morgan Dollar Mint State – 3,720,000 from the New Orleans Mint

1904 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 2,304,000 from the San Francisco Mint

1921 Morgan Dollar Mint State – 44,690,000 from the Philadelphia Mint

1921 D Morgan Dollar Mint State – 20,345,000 from the Denver Mint

1921 S Morgan Dollar Mint State – 21,695,000 from the San Francisco Mint

Proofs:

1878 8 Tail Feathers Morgan Dollar

1878 7 Tail Feathers Reverse of 1878 Morgan Dollar

1878 7 Tail Feathers Reverse of 1879 Morgan Dollar

1879 Morgan Dollar

1879-O Morgan Dollar

1880 Morgan Dollar

1881 Morgan Dollar

1882 Morgan Dollar

1883 Morgan Dollar

1883-O Morgan Dollar

1884 Morgan Dollar

1885 Morgan Dollar

1886 Morgan Dollar

1887 Morgan Dollar

1888 Morgan Dollar

1889 Morgan Dollar

1890 Morgan Dollar

1891 Morgan Dollar

1892 Morgan Dollar

1893 Morgan Dollar

1893-CC Morgan Dollar

1894 Morgan Dollar

1895 Morgan Dollar

1896 Morgan Dollar

1897 Morgan Dollar

1898 Morgan Dollar

1899 Morgan Dollar

1900 Morgan Dollar

1901 Morgan Dollar

1902 Morgan Dollar

1903 Morgan Dollar

1904 Morgan Dollar

1921 Chapman Morgan Dollar

Special Strikes

1878 8 Tail Feathers

1921 Zerbe Special Strike

1921-S Zerbe Special Strike

Detailed Specifications of the Morgan Silver Dollar Coin

The Morgan Silver Dollar Coin was composed of 90% Silver and 10% Copper. It weighs about 26.730 grams each and weighs 0.7734 Troy Ounces of actual Silver. The edge of the Morgan Silver Dollar was reeded. It has a diameter of 38.10 mm and is 2.40mm thick.

The Obverse

Brandon Grossardt for the coin image. George T. Morgan for the coin design., 1879S Morgan Dollar NGC MS67plus Obverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

The obverse side of the Morgan Silver Dollar Coin featured Miss Liberty’s head facing left with her hair on a Phrygian cap. Written in bold letters was the word LIBERTY, engraved in a ribbon that holds a spray of sheaves and leaves. E PLURIBUS UNUM sits just above Miss Liberty’s head in a form of an arc. Seven stars in the left and six stars can be seen with the date engraved in the middle.

The Reverse

Brandon Grossardt for the coin image. George T. Morgan for the coin design., 1879S Morgan Dollar NGC MS67plus Reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

As for the reverse, a proud Eagle had its wings spread while holding a branch and three arrows with its claws. Engraved in Old English, the words IN GOD WE TRUST can be seen above while UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and ONE DOLLAR surrounds the previous inscription. Denticles can be seen surrounding the border while the mint mark can be seen above the DO in Dollar and just below the wreath.

Things to Consider When Collecting Morgan Silver Dollars

Albertomos, USA-1885-one-dollar, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0
  1.    The Grade or Condition

It is important to keep in mind that when investing in Morgan Silver Dollars, it is best to buy those who are above AU-50 grade. Why? The reason is that the face value of Morgan Silver Dollars whose grade falls below AU-50 are only worth their silver bullion price.

Since many of these silver coins sat idly in vaults or even banks because only a few of Morgan Silver Dollar Coins are exempted from this rule. The best exemption would the scarcest of them all – the Carson City versions. Uncirculated Morgan Silver Dollars are very common.

So which ones should you settle with? It is best to purchase Morgan Silver Dollars in the highest grades and above. How to check for wear and tear on a Morgan Silver Dollar Coin?  Check the upper hold of Miss Liberty, her hair found just above eyes and ears and her cap’s upper fold.

  1. Errors and Varieties

Like most coins minted, errors are common and the Morgan Silver Dollar Coin is another proof that these errors are popular among collectors. Why? Because coins minted with errors are usually priced at a higher value and premiums are usually carried by such coins.

For Morgan Silver Dollars Coins, collectors look for VAM which stands for Van Allen’s and Mallis’ – the two researchers who were able to first notice the things that are different among varieties produced in a small mint of the same year. VAM was used to detect which Morgan dollars, as well as Peace dollars, are a common and not.

Some common errors found in Morgan Silver Dollars are the 7 over 6, 0 over 9,  8 over 7, 80 over 79 and the likes.

  1. Source of the Grading System

It is important to note that different sources may have different grading system than the other. Stick to reliable sources that provide consistent, unbiased and a non-subjective standard. NGC and PCGS may have a different price than other sources, but these two are widely acknowledged when it comes to grading systems.

  1. Make the wise decision of storing your Morgan Silver Dollars in a safe place you have control and access to.

Like any other investment, it would be wise to have something to hold on to – an assurance that you can easily track and check your investment while keeping them safe.

The Different Grades of a Morgan Silver Dollar Coins

Note: Coins in Mint State are coins that have the same condition it was created. These were never used as legal tender in exchange for services and products.

AG3 / AG-3 = Above Good – 3

Obverse: The head of Miss Liberty and the stars are almost flat. The rim of the coin is now blending with the field.

Reverse: The coin’s rim is now blending with the letters and fields. The Eagle only has a few feathers visible and is only showing an Eagle’s outline.

Summary: This circulated Morgan Silver Dollar Coin is worn out, barely legible, the date can still be read but is smoothened out. Rim might be blending on the field right now and the eagle would have appeared as an outline.

AG4 / AG-4 = Above Good – 4

Obverse: The details on Miss Liberty’s cap now appears and her hairline now blends with her face and is now visible. Most of the coin’s rim is complete. The stars are still distinct even if they are now somewhat flat. The letters can be clearly seen and are separate from the coin’s rim.

Reverse: The Eagle is still well defined but appears to be flat. Arrows have a couple of missing details.

Summary: This circulated Morgan Silver Dollar Coin was heavily worn out and some areas might even have faint areas, but the details can still be distinguished.

VG8 / VG8 = Very Good – 4

Obverse: Only 2/3 of the hairline is defined while the hair is now worn out. Miss Liberty’s neck details are starting to be expounded. The cotton bolls are also defined and flat.

Reverse: ½ to 2/3 is defined when it comes to the Eagle’s feathers. The leaves found on the wreath are starting to show, while the leaves in higher points are now flat.

Summary: Some details are missing, bigger elements are flat but can still be distinguished.

F12 / F-12 = Fine-12

Obverse: One can clearly see the hairline on Miss Liberty’s Face as well as the 2 lines on the cotton bolls. The cotton bolls lay flat

Reverse: ¾ of the details found on the wings of the Eagle are now showing. No fine details can be seen on the Eagle’s breast, neck, and head. The wreath now has more defined leaves.

Summary: The entire surface of the coin shows an even and moderate wear and tear. You can still clearly see and read all letters, dates, and legends.

VF20 / VF-20 = Very Fine-20

Obverse: The highest spots of Miss Liberty’s hair are flat while the other details are prominent. The wreath’s grains and cotton leaves are defined clearly but show obvious wear.

Reverse: Obvious worn yet distinct Eagle feathers on the wings. The Eagle’s head and neck details are beginning to show while the breast feathers are worn. You can see that the leaves found on the wreaths are well-defined but are still worn.

Summary: The overall appearance of the coin is still beautiful even with a minor to moderate wear found on the design’s highest points. Relatively flatness is just starting to show on this part of the coin.

EF40 / EF-40 / XF40 / XF-40 = Extra Fine-40

Obverse: Miss Liberty’s cheek shows a little bit of abrasion, and her forehead, neck, and ear show an evident tear. The hair details are defined as the highest point showing flatness.

Reverse: The Eagle has a well-defined feather wings, flat but evident neck details, flat but smooth talons while the breast details are worn smooth. The leaves in the wreath are sporting finer details except for the flat highest points.

Summary: Traces of Mint Luster may exist and the only part of the coin that has the slightest wear are the highest points. All elements of the design are well-defined and have sharp details.

AU55 / AU-55 = About Uncirculated-55

Obverse: The highest points which are the curls, forehead, ears, eyes, cheeks, and neck have slight wear. Evident slight rub caused by circulation is evident and mint luster is gone on Miss Liberty’s cheeks.

Reverse: Only plain details can be seen on the Eagle’s breast while its head, talons, and top of its leg only shows the slightest evidence of a tear.

Summary: The highest points of the coin are the only parts with traces of abrasions or minor wear. The surface of the coin is preserved well and has an almost complete mint cluster.

MS63 / MS-63 Mint State-63

Obverse: Complete and full mint luster is evident, and has unmistakable details found on the coins’ highest point. The fields and Miss Liberty’s cheeks have distant contact marks.

Reverse: The overall appearance of the coin is evident of distracting contact marks. The Eagle’s breast has fine breast feather details.

Summary: There is no evidence that the coin has been used in circulation. Mint cluster shows minor impairments but is still complete. There is no need for a magnification to clearly see scratches found on the hairline as well as bag and contact marks. The Morgan Dollar Silver Coin still has an overall attractive eye appeal.

MS65 / MS-65 = Mint State-65

Obverse: The overall appearance of the coin is still pleasing despite traces of evident contact marks found on the surface of the coin and in Miss Liberty’s cheeks.

Reverse: Only a few pieces of evidence of bag marks can be seen while The Eagle’s breast may have a clear sign of contact friction among other coins.

Summary: The coin has an above average eye appeal because the mint cluster has a high quality and was left undisturbed. You may find very few and small contact or bag marks here and there. With the help of a magnifying glass, you can see a few hairlines and how well the coin was struck.

MS67 / MS-67 = Mint State-67

Obverse: The mint luster of the coin is above average, and no evidence of wear and distracting marks can be seen.

Reverse: All of the details of the coin are kept in maximum quality and the coin has an excellent eye appeal.

Summary: The original mint luster is complete and is perfect, if not almost. If there are any contact marks present, these would only be about 3 or 4 and are barely unnoticeable. With proper magnification, a few hairlines are visible, and the overall appearance of the coin has an extraordinary eye appeal.

Key Dates for the Morgan Silver Dollars

1884 Morgan Silver Dollar

Has an auction record of $45,600 in PCGS-graded MS68 in 2008.

1889-CC Morgan Silver Dollar

Has an auction record of $881,250 in PCGS-graded MS68 in 2013.

1893-S Morgan Silver Dollar

Has an auction record of $646,250.00 in PCGS-graded MS65 in 2014.

1895 Deep Cameo Proof Morgan Silver Dollar

Has an auction record of $199,750.00 in PCGS-graded PR67DC in 2017.

1901 Morgan Silver Dollar

Has an auction record of $155,250.00 in NGC-graded MS65 in 2009.

How Much Are Morgan Silver Dollar Coins?

The price will depend on many factors, like if your coin was circulated or not, what the grade or condition of the coins is, the number of coins of that particular coin and how much was left, the demand of the market, the dealer’s stock and as well as the melt value.

Evidently, it is best to stick to uncirculated coins when it comes to coin investing, because no one would want a higher buy and sell price, right?

One can buy Morgan Silver Dollars starting at $22 and up to hundreds of dollars. One must remember that Morgan Silvers come in different grades – not only in regular strikes and proof but also cameo and deep cameo. Those in cameo and deep cameo have this mirror-like and frosted surface which are very rare, making them extremely expensive.

For the price guide of PCGC-graded Morgan Silver Dollars, you can check here.

Did you know?

The King of All Morgan Silver Dollar Coins is the 1895 Morgan Silver Dollar. This is the rarest variety of the Morgan Silver Dollar. The highest amount paid for this variety ever recorded was a staggering $ 199,750.00.

The Morgan Silver Dollar was called by various names, but the name of its designer proved to be the best name for the beautiful silver dollar coin. Some of the names used to call this silver dollar were “Buzzard Dollar” and “Cartwheels.”

If you’re looking for the best specimen of Morgan Silver Dollars, always go for the plain 1895 Morgan Silver Dollar Coin.

It may have had a rough start, but the Morgan Silver Dollar proved it is worth collecting after how many years of being ignored. Nowadays, it is one of the most sought-after US coins. The fact that it was very hard to catch a Morgan Silver Dollar Coin in Mint state, assembling a complete set only made the chase a more challenging yet compelling one. This beautiful coin was so popular and in demand that there are many collectors who will be very much delighted after acquiring one of these in a year.

 

References:

NGCCoin, PCGSPCGS CoinFacts, American Numismatics Association, Coin Trackers, The Spruce

Feature Image Source: AlbertomosUSA-1885-one-dollar, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Eisenhower Dollar

Our nation has produced many coins that did not rise in popularity when issued. It seems that all efforts of minting dollar coins in the 20th century were evidently, the last attempts as the public are no longer interested in using bulky and heavy coins for their everyday use. The 1971 Eisenhower Dollar, commonly called and also referred to as the “Ike Dollar,” is an example of such coins.

The Eisenhower Dollar was issued by the United States Mint way back in 1971 through 1978. This was a one-dollar coin that serves to commemorate the late General and two-term President Dwight David Eisenhower as well as the Apollo 11, the first spaceflight that landed the first two humans on the moon.

What makes the Eisenhower Dollar Coin special? The Ike Dollar Coin was the first large coin produced by the United States Mints after many years. The last large-sized coin produced was in 1935 – the year when the last series of the Peace Dollar was struck. It took more or less than 36 years before another batch of big and bulky coins were approved and produced in US Mints, and were circulated and issued to the public and collectors.

The Ike Dollar’s Historical Background

It was in March 1964 when the Treasury Department of the United States ordered to put a stop to the use of silver dollars. To everyone’s surprise, a vote was made by the Congress to mint additional silver dollars’ worth 45 Million dollars.

However, just after 316,076 coins were struck, the Mint’s machinery and manpower employment was terminated. Because of this, no coins were issued. Consequently, the Coinage Act of July 23, 1965 has included in its provision that no standard silver dollar coins will be coined within the next five years.

As the end of the Coinage Act’s five-year ban approached, the Treasury Department wanted to create a circulating dollar coin in honor of the two-term President Eisenhower, who was also a war hero. However, the idea was never considered as a serious matter even if there were some who wanted to sell the commemorative coin to coin collectors at that time.

It was only when Congressman Bob Casey of Texas inaugurated a bill that suggested the commemoration of both Eisenhower and the success of the Apollo II did the idea made a buzz in the House of Congress. It was around the time when the United States of America was able to beat Russia in successfully landing the first two men on the moon.

To say it was the perfect reason was an understatement. With Eisenhower’s authorization in creating the National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA, he did make the space mission a possibility. After a year of constant debates here and there, the bill was finally approved in its final and modified form on December 31, 1970. One can say it was what sealed the deal even if it took a while before it was approved.

As imposed by the Coinage Act of July 23, 1965, the new Ike Dollar coin will have a diameter and thickness like that of the coins previously minted. The only difference would be the design and the metal composition which would be a copper-nickel clad base. A clad coin is one that has different layers of metal on it.

Mary Brooks, the current Mint Director during that time, wanted to produce the coins as soon as possible. She appointed Frank Gasparro, the Chief Engraver to create the coin models as there was no time left to hold a public competition for the design. He featured Eisenhower on the obverse side (head of the coin that features that main design) since he authorized the creation of NASA way back in 1974, while the reverse (back of the coin) will include a design featuring the Apollo II mission.

The Obverse

Brandon Grossardt for the photograph; Frank Gasparro for the coin design., 1974S Eisenhower Obverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

Gasparro designed both front and back of the coin. On the obverse of the coin which is commonly called the head of the coin, he settled on a bare-headed profile bust of the late President Eisenhower who was facing left. The legend “LIBERTY” was arranged in an arc just above Eisenhower’s head, while he placed the words “IN GOD, WE TRUST” below the late president’s chin. On the bust’s truncation lies Gasparro’s initials which are FG. The date was strategically placed at the bottom, as well as the mintmark if there is any above the date and to the right.

The Reverse

Brandon Grossardt for the photograph; Frank Gasparro for the coin design., 1974S Eisenhower Reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

As for the reverse or the tails of the coin, Gasparro used the image Apollo II’s mission insignia. He used a bald eagle’s design carrying an olive branch with its clawed feet that were landing on a crater-pocked surface of the moon. The earth was also included in the design, having been used as a distant piece of the background from space. Centered just above the Eagle design, the motto “E PLURIBUS UNUM” was used while Gasparro arranged the legend “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” around the upper periphery in the form of an arc. He superimposed the value of the coin which was one dollar one the lower periphery of the moon’s surface. The earth, eagle, and motto were surrounded by an arc of stars and his initials FG can be seen on the eagle’s tail.

The Eisenhower Dollar was issued no later than November 1, 1971, but no one knows the exact reason why. After issuance of the coins, many collectors grabbed the opportunity to snap a good portion of these coins and even a few months after, eventually reaching the channels of commerce.

However, the truth was revealed when it became obvious that the public no longer wants to make use of coins that are big, bulky and heavy. Casinos may have welcomed the idea of using real dollar coins to supersede and replace their tokens which has the same size and dimension, yet they too became exhausted in using such coins. More often than not, casino players will take these coins at home, treating them as souvenirs and imagined them as rare coins since these were scarcely seen in public.

When the demand went downhill for the new Eisenhower dollar, the amount minted in 1973 was only enough to fulfill the orders made by collectors. Denver and Philadelphia only had minted a total mintage rate of 2 million each. San Francisco, on the other hand, only minted what was known as the “Blue Ike”. Such coins were the uncirculated (coins that have never been used in public and has no damages on it) edition of silver-clad coins. The regular proof sets (early coin samples meant to test dies and collected by coin enthusiasts) included a coined proof of the copper-nickel version at the beginning of 1973.

During the celebration of the Bicentennial of the American Revolution, the Ike Dollar received a makeover – a competition commenced to change the reverse design of the Eisenhower Dollar. In the end, Dennis R. Williams won when he cleverly used the Liberty Bell and Moon in his design.

William’s design represented both the past and the present. The Liberty Bell symbolizes freedom and liberty while the moon was a tribute to Gasparro’s original Ike Dollar design. The new Ike Dollar with the Bicentennial design carried the dates 1776-1976 and were coined in 1975-1976.

Subsequently, the dates in the Eisenhower Dollar Coins do not bear the year 1975 even though the coins were released in 1975.

The Eisenhower Dollar Minting and Composition

The Ike Dollar or the Eisenhower Dollars were minted in short duration– from 1971-1978 only. The first Eisenhower Dollar coin was struck (produced in Mints) in San Francisco, California. The date of the first strike was on March 31, 1971, at the United States Assay Office. The San Francisco Office produced Eisenhower Proof Coins at an estimated 20 million coins for four years.

Each coin went up for sale for $10. Proof coins are valuable because of their flawless appearance. The way they are made as just as intricate as the production of fine pieces of jewelry. They are fed to the proof-coining press by hand. The blank coins are highly polished and are struck not only once, but twice.

It was the first one dollar coin that was minted and released after switching copper-nickel clad composition from silver-based coins. The same compositions were used in coining nickels, quarters and half-dollars.

Differences between a Clad or Silver Eisenhower Dollar Coin

Composition

The Eisenhower Dollar Coin can be a clad coin or silver coin.

A clad coin is one that consists of multiple metal layers. The net composition of a Clad Ike Dollar Coin has 75% Copper and 25% Nickel on the outer side of the coin, while the inner side consists of 100% Copper.

The net composition of the outer layer of a Silver Ike Dollar Coin was composed of 80% silver and 20% Copper. The core is composed of 79.1 Copper and only 20.9% Silver. The total Silver content of a Silver Ike Dollar Coin is 40%. A Silver Edition Eisenhower Dollar Coin Proof has a silver amount of 0.3162 troy ounces (oz t).

Consequently, the new Ike Dollar Coins, the Bicentennial Ike Dollars were authorized to be minted with the same composition.

Diameter, Thickness, and Edge Type

Both the Clad and Silver Ike Dollar Coin has a diameter of 38.10mm and 2.58 thickness. Both also have Reeded edges.

Year of Production, Mint Location and Type

The Philadelphia Mint produced Ike Dollar Coins in the years 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977 and 1978. Philadelphia Mint produced only Clad type Ike Dollar Coins. In 1972, the three reverse varieties were born. In 1976, the Bicentennial Ike Dollar Coins were produced in Types 1 and 2 Clad Coins.

The Denver Mint produced Ike Dollar Coins with the Mint Mark D and produced only clad coins in 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977 and 1978. They produced Types 1 and 2 Bicentennial Ike Dollar Coins in 1976.

The San Francisco Mint was the only Mint out of the three US Mints to produce both Clad and Silver Ike Dollar Coins as well as Proof Coins. Clad, Silver, and Proof Coins were produced in 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977 and 1978. Bicentennial Coins in Silver were produced in 1976.

As you can see, no Ike Dollar Coin was dated in the year 1975. The reason behind this was because, during the year 1975-1976, the Bicentennial Ike Coins which were special coins were minted or produced. Thus, no Ike Dollar Coin has the date 1975 on it.

The Eisenhower Dollar Coin which was produced by the San Francisco Mint has two varieties – one is the 1971-S Uncirculated Eisenhower Dollar and the second being the 1971-s Proof Eisenhower Dollar.

The total number of 1971-S Uncirculated Eisenhower Dollars produced was approximately 6,868,530. As for the 1971-s Proof Eisenhower Dollar, approximately 4,265,234 were struck. The value of each Silver Edition Coins is widely influenced by the prevailing value of Silver. However, Silver is usually priced at $20 per ounce. One can expect that the price for each uncirculated variety of the 1971-s Proof Eisenhower Dollar could be around $9. For the 1971-s Proof Eisenhower Dollar, it can be around $11.

Like any other coins, higher grades of Ike Dollar Coins are extremely hard to find. If you ever come across one, the price would be definitely higher than the ones you can easily find at dealers.  

The Three Different Varieties of the 1972 Edition Eisenhower Dollar Coin

The United States Mint was able to create three varieties of the Eisenhower’s Reverse design. All three reverse types were coined, issued and used on different coins with just one exception. The US Mint in Philadelphia struck the 1972 Ike Dollars at different times during the year, thus creating three varieties. One of the three types, however, represented a mintage rarity lower than the two.

What makes the varieties different from one another? The reverse of the Eisenhower coins has different appearances of the Earth while it sits on the background of the coin’s tail.

The Three Types of The 1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin Reverse    

1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin Type 1

This Ike Dollar has a reverse design that has an overall low relief, which is why it is also called the “Low Relief Reverse Type.” This means the coins has an overall appearance of relatively flat and shallow field.

Type 1 can be distinguished by the features of the Earth – the three islands fall to the right of Florida. Also, the Earth is flat between the 8 o’clock to 11 o’clock. It is also important to note that the feathers on the Eagle’s breasts are not only distinct but are also raised.

This reverse design was issued in 1971 and was commonly used to accommodate business strike coins.

1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin Type 2

Type 2 was also called the ‘Proof” design because, among the three reverse designs, this is the only one with an utterly unique and completely different look. This is the reason why the Type 2 Eisenhower Dollar Reverse design was considered the most valuable of all three varieties.

One can easily identify this reverse design as the three islands were missing beneath Florida. Not only are that, the continent’s lack in detail and incuse water lines evident. This variety featuring a higher relief was used for uncirculated Ike dollars as well as 1972-S Proof. It is believed that there are only less than 100,000 Type 2 Eisenhower Dollar minted.

NGC was able to grade only 89 Ike Dollars with a Type 2 reverse design. Because of its rarity, the Ike Dollar with the Type 2 reverse design is the most sought after. Consequently, it also has the highest value of all. Suffice to say, if you want the rarest, most valuable type of Eisenhower Dollar, the 1972 Type 2 Ike Dollar is what you’re looking for.

1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin Type 3

The Type 3 Eisenhower Dollar is known as the “Normal Reverse Ike Dollar.” The design has a higher overall relief than the Type 1 Ike Dollar. It can easily be distinguished as the three islands fall below and to the left of Florida, and the details are strengthened in appearance than that of Type 1.

The reason behind the change was because the US Mint used a tougher die steel during the remainder of the Philadelphia Mint’s production of the 1972 Ike Dollar Coins. In the succeeding year, Proof and Business Strike Eisenhower Dollars used this variety.

Eisenhower Dollar Coin Errors

If you are a coin collector or enthusiast, you may now have an idea that some coins are made with errors. Someone who is not interested in coin collecting may think a coin with an error will have a lower face value or may even lose its value, but that’s not always the case. Coin collectors will usually be interested in Eisenhower Dollar Coins that have errors in them as these coins usually carry a higher price than the regular face value since errors are rare and valued.

1971-S Proof Eisenhower Dollar Coin – Normal R

The error in this Ike Coin is on the letter “R” of LIBERTY. The R has a serif on the bottom vertical leg – two artistic protrusions. Serifs can be defined as the pointed extensions one can see at the end of a number or letter.

1971-S Proof Eisenhower Dollar Coin – Peg Leg R

The error in this Ike Coin is the letter “R” of LIBERTY has no serif.

Type 1 1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin (Low Relief)

The Eisenhower Dollar Coin with the Type Reverse has missing islands on the Earth. These were used from January to August 1972.

Type 2 1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin (High Relief)

Dubbed as the rarest among the three reverse designs of the 1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin, this was made because of an error. In the Philadelphia Mint, a proof reverse die was wrongly used in August. It was used only once and was made by a single die. Aside from the fact that the three islands near Florida are missing, it looks as if incuse lines are used to symbolize water, and the top and bottom of the design of North and South America appeared to fade.

Type 3 1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin (Modified High Relief)

A new reverse die was used to create the third type of Ike Dollars from September 1972 and up until the year ends. The feathers of the Eagle are no longer defined and seems to have smoothened out. The three islands that were missing in Type 2 Ike Dollars are now visible on the left and beneath of Florida.

Type 1 1976 Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar Coin

The Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar Coins were produced with dual dates in 1975. The US Mint produced this Ike Coins with dates 1776-1976. At first, the US Mint used a reverse die on the words UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and ONE DOLLAR with thick letters. The horizontal bar of the letter “T” in STATES have square endings.

Type 2 1976 Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar Coin

In the Type 21976 Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar Coin, a different reverse die was used. The US Mint made use of a new die that made the letters in UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and ONE DOLLAR are thin. Instead of a square ending in the horizontal bad of T in “STATES,” each end are now slanted.

The PCGS CoinFacts’ Eisenhower Dollar Coin Categories

PCGS CoinFacts was created in 1999 by Ron Guth, an author, and numismatic expert. PCGS categorizes the Eisenhower Dollar Coin based on the design and metal content of the coin.

The Type 1, Clad Ike Dollar

These are copper-nickel clad coins with the same metal composition as those with lower denominations like nickels, quarters and half-dollars.

Regular Strike:

1971 Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are  47,799,000

1971-D Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are  68,587,424

1972 Type 1 Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are  75,890,000

1972 Type 2 Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are  75,890,000

1972 Type 3 Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are  75,890,000

1972-D Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are  92,548,511

1973 Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are  2,000,056

1973-D Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 2,000,000

1974 Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 27,366,000

1974-D Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 45,517,000

1977 Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 12,596,000

1977-D Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 32,983,006

1978 Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 25,702,000

1978-D Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 33,012,890

Proofs

1973-S Clad Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 2,760,339

1974-S Clad Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 2,612,568

1977-S Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 3,251,152

1978-S Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 3,127,781

The Type 2, Silver Ike Dollar

These are Eisenhower Dollar Coins that were uncirculated, are Proof versions and are composed of up to 40% silver. The Proof Coins were sold individual inside a brown cardboard slipcase and are in GSA slabs. Uncirculated Type 2, Silver Ike Dollars, on the other hand, were stored in individual blue envelopes and are packed in a glossy platform packs.

Regular Strikes

1971-S Silver Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 6,868,530

1972-S Silver Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 2,193,056

1973-S Silver Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 869,400

1974-S Silver Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 1,900,156

Proofs

1971-S Silver Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 4,265,234

1971-S Type 1 Reverse Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 4,265,234

1972-S Silver Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 1,811,631

1973-S Silver Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 1,013,646

1974-S Silver Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 1,306,579

Special Strikes

1971-S Prototype Strike – DDO-023 Eisenhower Dollar

1971-S Prototype Strike – DMR-039 Eisenhower Dollar

The Type 3, Clad Bicentennial Reverse (1976)

These Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollars were minted in 1975 and 1976 were made using Copper-Nickel “clad “ alloy.

Regular Strikes

1976 Type 1 Clad Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 4,019,000

1976 Type 2 Clad Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 113,318,000

1976-D Type 1 Clad Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 21,048,710

1976-D Type 2 Clad Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 82,179,564

Proofs

1976-S Clad Type 1 Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 2,845,450

1976-S Clad Type 2 Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 4,149,730

The Type 4, Silver Bicentennial Reverse (1976)

These Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollars were minted in 1975 and 1976 were made using 40% silver “clad “ alloy.

Regular Strikes

1976-S Silver Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 11,000,000

Proofs

1976-S Silver Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced are 4,000,000

1976 No S Type 2 – Silver Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar – Total number of coins produced is 1

The Eisenhower or Ike Dollar Price Values

Although the Ike Dollars are no longer in mint, there are still people who use them for trade. .The three varieties of the Eisenhower dollar have different values, and obviously, one of the three are favored by coin collectors and enthusiasts. Some would go to their local banks bringing rolls of these Ike Dollars with them in exchange for current paper money.

If you plan on collecting Eisenhower Dollars, there are things you should keep in mind, like the following:

  • The key dates when the coin was minted and issued
  • The rarity of the coin
  • The variety or reverse type of the Eisenhower Dollar Coin
  • The surviving population of the coin
  • The type of strike used to produce the coin
  • The melt value of the coin
  • The demand
  • The dealer’s stock

The Eisenhower Dollar Coin was minted from 1971-1978. The key date in coins can refer to the date or the mint mark and date combination of a series of a coin.

Mint Marks can be letters or symbols that identify which Mint the coin was made at. The Mint Marks in the Eisenhower Dollar Coins are seen at the obverse side of the coin – just above the key date and just below the truncation of President Eisenhower. Three US Mints produced the Ike Dollar Coin – Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Denver.

Mint Mark for the Ike Dollar Coin produced by Denver has the symbol (D), while those issued by San Francisco Mint has the symbol (S). As for Philadelphia Mint, there is no Mint Mark. To check for the Mint Mark of the Eisenhower Dollar Coin, look for the tiny symbol located above the number “7” in the date of the obverse or face of the coin.

One can buy Eisenhower Dollars starting at $1 for the most common varieties while the rarest one, the 1972 Type 2 Ike Dollar, are sold by dealers for $10,250.

For a price guide of the Ike Dollars, you may check the list on PCGS on this link.

How are Eisenhower Dollar Coins graded?

Like most coins, Ike Dollar Coins are graded based on their condition. They are usually graded using the grading standard for Eisenhower Dollar Coin:

MS65 Choice Uncirculated. This means the coin only has contact marks scattered on the surface of the coin which is not at all distracting. Overall, the coin has a good eye appeal and has a strong glow

MS64 Uncirculated. The coin has a few contact marks scattered on the surface of the coin. It still has a good eye appeal and an attractive glow.

MS63 Uncirculated. The coin has an impaired glow due to some distracting contact marks found on the surface of the coin and other focal points, making it less “attractive.”

Uncirculated. The coin is in great condition – no traces of wear and tear can be found, but may have some noticeable blemish but still has its full mint glow.

AU50 About Uncirculated. One can see there is still a mint glow or luster present. However, there are noticeable contact marks.

EF40 Extremely Fine. Slight yet slightly worn hairlines in President Eisenhower’s ear and brow can be seen, and the Eagle’s wing feathers are faint but still visible.

VF20 Very Fine. Eisenhower’s brow is worn, hair strands over his ear are still well defined and the Eagle’s feather still shows.

Five of the most valuable Ike Dollar Coin were graded MS63 Uncirculated and MS65 Choice Uncirculated. These are the following:

  • 1976-S silver Proof Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar
  • Low-Relief Eisenhower Dollar
  • 1972 Modified High-Relief Eisenhower Dollar
  • 1973-S Silver Proof Eisenhower Dollar
  • 1972 High-Relief Eisenhower Dollar

Surprisingly, the most expensive Ike Dollar Coins are worth thousands of dollars each. These were not the Silver Edition ones, but are actually the Business Strike, Clad Eisenhower Dollar Coins the graded above MS65 Choice Uncirculated.

Collecting Eisenhower Dollar Coins

If you want to start collecting your very own Ike Dollar Coins, it is best to know and understand all there is to know when it comes to this coin. Did you know that these Ike Dollar Coins are the last large-sized coins ever struck, minted and produced?

For you to acquire a complete set of the Eisenhower Dollar, you will need to collect all 34 Eisenhower Dollar Coins. Unfortunately, the Ike Dollars are no longer struck, mined and produced. However, there are collectors and coin dealers who are willing to buy and sell coins, including the Ike Dollar Coins.

If you’re looking for the perfect place to find and buy Ike Dollar Coins, these are usually circulated in the casinos. These are located on the West Coast of the United States. Also, don’t underestimate the internet. There are lots of websites where you can purchase different coins, including Ike Dollar Coins.

The easiest Eisenhower Dollar Coins coin collectors were able to find are the 1971 and 1972 Ike Dollar Coins. However, what you really want to find if you are serious about coin collecting is the 1972 Eisenhower Dollar Coin Type 2. Any Eisenhower Dollar Type 2 Coin is rare. It is said that out of the 76,000,000 coins produced, only less than 100,000 Type 2 Eisenhower Dollar Reverse designed coins were produced. Even if you were able to get a hold of a 1972 Type 2 Ike Dollar, you can get a higher premium for it because the highest graded example is MS66. Do you know what that means? It means getting one is like owning a 1938 3-legged buffalo nickel. Or maybe a 1955 Lincoln cent.

Remember, those coins are it Ike Dollar Coins or any other type of coins, the circulated coins will have the lowest amount of face value. As for Uncirculated Ike Dollar Coins, you can purchase them around $10 each. If you happen to stumble upon Silver Ike Dollar Coins, the face value of the coin will depend on the current price of Silver.

If you’re only a beginner when it comes to coin collecting, do not worry much about the variety of dies used to make the Ike Dollar Coin, the Proof Coins and if it is a Special Edition Issues. Try to focus on collecting and sorting your circulated and uncirculated coins based on the mint marks and dates.

Are you an intermediate coin collector? By now you have assembled both circulated and uncirculated coins with their dates and mint marks. It’s time to include Eisenhower’s Dollar Proof Coins as well as the special collector’s issue. It is best to collect the Business Strike Ike Dollar Coins that are in uncirculated conditions.

As for the expert coin collectors, make sure include the more popular die varieties, special collector issues, business strike issues and Proof coins when collecting all 34 Eisenhower Dollar Coins. An advanced coin collector will strive to get their hands on the best quality coins while taking in to consideration all important matters when it comes to coin collecting.

In Conclusion, the Eisenhower’s Dollar Coins are very much worth collecting. There are many ways on how one can customize your Ike Dollar collection that will not only fit your budget but can also match your goals. If you have a tight budget but still wants to collect Eisenhower Dollar coins, they are lots of options to choose from, as well as coin dealers to explore. It is best to start small and make your way up. Building success doesn’t happen overnight, so patience is one the keys to becoming a successful coin collector.

Got the means to start big? Then go for the Ike Dollars in best conditions and enjoy the freedom of choosing between major, minor or both varieties.

References:

PCGS CoinFacts, PCGS, NGCCoin, Eisenhower Dollar Guide, Silver Dollar Co.The Spruce

Featured Image: Miosw, Coin One Dollar USA, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC0 1.0

The Flowing Hair Dollar

History of the Flowing Hair Dollar

In 1792, the first ever Mint in the United States was established thanks to the Coinage Act of 1792. This very act made by the Congress on April 2, 1792 created our standard unit of money, the US Dollar. It aims to create a coinage system consisting of dimes, cents, dollars, half-denominations, and eagles. The coins struck that same year were only seen as patterns. By 1793, cents and half cents were minted – all made of copper and by 1794, the first silver dollar and half dollar coins were issued.

The Coinage Act was created in 1792 but it was only in the year 1794 that the US Mint was authorized to create first silver dollar coin which was the 1794 Flowing Hair. It has the same design as the half dollar, but since the Mint considers the dollar to be more reputable, the silver dollar was struck first. There were coined in the Philadelphia Mint.

The US Mint has already started the production of the Silver Dollar months before they were authorized to do so. Robert Scot, the US Mint Engraver who prepared the models for the Flowing Hair dollar already had the designs ready. The Congress wanted the silver dollar coin to have a symbolic portrait of Miss Liberty to which Scot obliged.

United States Mint, Smithsonian Institution, Flowing hair dollar, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Obverse was taken from a 1792 25-cents pattern created by Joseph Wright. It features Miss Liberty’s profile bust facing right, with her hair flowing freely behind her. It symbolizes freedom and to which the coin was named Flowing Hair Dollar. The word LIBERTY is inscribed above her profile bust and the date below her. 15 stars are on either side of her symbolizing the number of states the US had at that time.

United States Mint, Smithsonian Institution, Flowing hair dollar reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

For the reverse, an Eagle is seen perched on a rock has its wings spread while being surrounded by laurel leaves. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds the Eagle and the laurel leaves. It is made of 90% Silver and 10% Copper. It weighs approximately 27g and is 40mm in diameter. It has a lettered edge with the words HUNDRED CENTS ONE DOLLAR OR UNIT. This design only lasted for two years – from 1794 to 1795 until it was replaced by the Draped Bust Dollar.

The Flowing Hair Silver Dollar only has four regular strikes and one special strike:

1794 Flowing Hair Dollar – 1,758 coins minted

1794 Special Strike Flowing Hair Dollar – coins minted not available

1795 3 Leaves Flowing Hair Dollar – 160,295 coins minted

1795 2 Leaves Flowing Hair Dollar – 160,295 coins minted

1795 Silver Plug Flowing Hair Dollar – 16,029 coins minted

The 1795 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar has three varieties – the 3 Leaves, the 2 Leaves, and the Silver Plug variety. The 3 Leaves variety can be distinguished by the three leaves found on either side of the Eagle, just below its wings. The 2 Leaves variety only has 2 leaves under each wing. The Silver Plug can be determined by faint circular outlines made by the plug used to strike found on the center of either side of the coin.

Collecting Flowing Hair Silver Dollar Coins

Flowing Hair Silver Dollar Coins are well-loved and sought after by coin collectors Aside from its rarity, it is a very short series that is also a significant piece of the US Coinage History. According to the PCGS, Flowing Hair Silver Dollar Coins are worth $1,500.00 up to S5,000.00, depending on the rarity and variety for the regular series and $10,000,000.00 for the Special Strike 1794 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar Coins. One can check for the price set by PCGS-graded coins here.

On January 24, a 1794 Special Strike Flowing Hair Silver Dollar Coins was sold at an auction at $10 million dollars and bought by Legend Numismatics.The most expensive in the regular series being the 1794 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar Coin. It is said that only 150 pieces are known to exist nowadays despite having 1,758 coins minted. It was believed that since the coins were rejected, most were melted.  

When collecting Flowing Hair Silver Dollar Coins, the places to look for wear are Miss Liberty’s hair found just above the forehead, her cheeks, and shoulders. For the reverse, look for signs to tear on the Eagle’s head, breast and the top of his wings.

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coin Facts, NGC Coin, USA Coinbook, Reuters