The Classic Head $5

In 1834, the US Mint created new designs for the US Gold Coins in circulation. The Act of June 28, 1834, was the one responsible for the reduction of the gold coins weight and metal composition. Before, the Gold $5 coin which was the Capped Bust $5 weighs 8.75 grams and was composed of 91.7% Gold and 7.3% Copper. The new $5 coins were 8.24 grams and are now made up of 89.9% Gold and 10.1% Copper.

Samuel Moore, US Mint Director at that time appointed US Mint Engraver William Kneass to prepare the new designs that are entirely different from the previous issues. For the obverse, Kneass created a design where a tousled-haired Miss Liberty was facing left. She was wearing a headband with the word LIBERTY inscribed on it. 13 stars surrounds the profile portrait of Miss Liberty while the date sits below it.

For the reverse, the image of a Heraldic Eagle with the Great Seal of the United States on its chest was featured. The Eagle is seen clutching an olive branch and three arrows on its talons while the words the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the denomination 5 D. encircles the Eagle. Moore omitted the legend E PLURIBUS UNUM.

The design of the Classic Head $5 was continuously changed as some US Mint officials felt unsatisfied with Kneass’ idea. When Kneass’s health deteriorated, Christian Gobrecht was tasked to take his place and went on modifying the design up until 1836.

The Classic Head $5 were minted in US Mints located in Philadelphia, Charlotte, and Dahlonega. Coins bear the mintmarks C and D Charlotte and Dahlonega Mints respectively while those minted in Philadelphia bears no mintmarks.

The Classic Head $5 has a reeded edge, weighs 8.34 grams, are 22.50mm in diameter and has a metal composition of 89.9% Gold and 10.1% Copper. These were minted from 1834-1836 only. Despite its five short years of production, there were a series of varieties that emerged – one of which are changes in the hair of Miss Liberty.

Varieties, Mint Marks and Mintages of the Classic Head $5

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1834-G$5-Classic Head, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Regular Strike

1834 – 657,460 pieces were minted in the Philadelphia Mint

  •    1834 Classic-Plain 4
  •    1834 Classic-Cross 4

1835 – 371,534 pieces were minted in the Philadelphia Mint

1836 – 553,147 pieces were minted in the Philadelphia Mint

1837 – 286,588 pieces were minted in the Philadelphia Mint

1838-C – 17,179 pieces were minted in the Charlotte Mint

1838-D – 20,583 pieces were minted in the Dahlonega Mint

Proofs

1834 Classic-Plain 4 – minted in the Philadelphia Mint

1835 – minted in the Philadelphia Mint

1836 – minted in the Philadelphia Mint

Collecting Classic Head $5

With regards to Classic Head $5 Gold Coins, these are more affordable compared than the Classic Head $2.5 Gold Coins since these have a higher number of coins produced. It is also not impossible for gold coin collectors to find and complete the series. Two of the most sought-after Classic Head $5 are those minted in Charlotte and Dahlonega.

The highest-priced Classic Head $5 in Mint State are those dated 1834 Plain 4, 1837 and 1838. One can obtain PCGS-graded Classic Head $5 in Mint State for a minimum of $450.00 and up to $285,000.00. For Proofs, prices start at $40,000.00 and up to $$875,000.00.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin

The Capped Bust $5

After the Draped Bust $5, a new design emerged in 1807 – the Capped Bust $5. When Robert Pattinson succeed US Mint Director Henry DeSaussere, he appointed a German Engraver named John Reich as Robert Scot’s assistant. Scot has been securing his position as Chief Engraver for years, but as he gets older, Mint Officials have been wary that no one would be talented enough to take his position. Despite Scot’s persistence, DeSaussere hired Reich as his assistant but was only allowed other tasks that did not include creating designs for the coins.

Reich’s ability was recognized even by then-President Thomas Jefferson that when Reich decided to return to Europe, DeSaussere did everything just to make him stay. He was offered the permanent position and was now task to redesign all US coins – including the $5 Gold coin.

Reich’s design for the new $5 Gold coin came to be known as the Capped Bust $5. On the obverse, Miss Liberty is seen facing left while wearing a cloth cap with the word LIBERTY written across it. Seven stars are on the left side of the coin and 6 on the other while the date lies just beneath the profile bust. Miss Liberty now looks more like a European woman with her hair resting on her shoulders.

For the reverse,  Heraldic Eagle with the Great Seal of the United States is seen with its widespread wings while clutching a branch of an olive brand and three arrows on its talons. E PLURIBUS UNUM is inscribed on a ribbon just above the Eagle’s head. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds the Eagle in a form of an arc while the denomination 5 D. is below.

Types, Varieties, and Mintages of the Capped Bust $5

Type 1 Large Bust, Capped Bust $5

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1807-G$5-Capped Bust, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The first type was minted from 1807-1812. The overall size of Miss Liberty’s head was enlarged while the cap she was wearing was lowered. All dates have high mintages and a number of variations were made for the Type 1 Capped Bust $5 but no Proofs were made.

Regular Strike

1807 Bust Left – 51,605 pieces were minted

1808 – 55,578 pieces were minted

  •    1808/7

1809 – 33,875 pieces were minted

  •    1809/8

1810 – 100,287 pieces were minted

  •    1810 Small Date, Small 5
  •    1810 Small Date, Tall 5
  •    1810 Large Date, Small 5
  •    1810 Large Date, Large 5

1811 – 99,581 pieces were minted

  •    1811 Small 5
  •    1811 Tall 5

1812 – 58,087 pieces were minted

Type 2 Small Bust, Large Diameter Capped Bust $5

 

 

Coin: John Reich, Image by Lost Dutchman Rare Coins, 1818 half eagle obverse, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US
Coin: John Reich, Image by Lost Dutchman Rare Coins, 1818 half eagle reverse, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

Starting 1813, Miss Liberty’s décolletage was eliminated while the size and shape of her cap were also altered. as for the reverse, aside from the positioning of the arrows and the structure of wings, only minimal changes were made. The Type 2 Capped Bust $5 were minted from 1813-1829. No coins were dated 1816 and 1817.

Regular Strike

1813 – 95,428 pieces were minted     –

1814 – 15,454 pieces were minted

  •    1814/3

1815 – 635 pieces were minted

1818 – 48,588 pieces were minted

  •    1818
  •    1818 5D/50
  •    1818 STATESOF

1819 – 51,723 pieces were minted

  •    1819
  •    1819 5D/50

1820 – 263,806 pieces were minted

  •    1820 Square 2
  •    1820 Curl 2-Small Letters
  •    1820 Curl 2-Large Letters

1821 – 34,631 pieces were minted

1822 – 17,796 pieces were minted

1823 – 14,485 pieces were minted

1824 – 17,340 pieces were minted

1825 – 29,060 pieces were minted

  •    1825/4/1
  •    1825/4

1826 – 18,069 pieces were minted

1827 – 24,913 pieces were minted

1828 – 28,029 pieces were minted

  •    1828/7

1829 – 25,375 pieces were minted

  •    1829 Large Size

Proofs

1820 – 5 pieces were minted

1821 – 3 pieces were minted

1825/1 – 3 pieces were minted

1826 – 3 pieces were minted

1828 – 5 pieces were minted

1829 Large Size – 5 pieces were minted

Type 3 Small Diameter Capped Bust $5

The third and last type of the Capped Bust $5 now has a closed collar which resulted in uniform diameter among all coins struck. Minting started from 1829 up until 1834. Many variations were produced like a different number of stars in the obverse and large and small dates. Modifications were made to accommodate the new technology in striking the coins.

Regular Strike

1829 – 32,076 pieces were minted

  •    1829 Small Size

1830 – 126,351 pieces were minted

  •    1830 Small 5D
  •    1830 Large 5D

1831 – 140,594 pieces were minted

  •    1831 Small 5D
  •    1831 Large 5D

1832 – 157,487 pieces were minted

  •    1832 12 Stars
  •    1832 13 Stars

1833 – 193,630 pieces were minted

  •    1833 Large Date
  •    1833 Small Date

1834 – 50,141 pieces were minted

  •    1834 Capped-Plain 4
  •    1834 Capped-Cross 4

Proofs

1829 Small Size – 5 pieces were minted

1830 – 3 pieces were minted

1831 – 3 pieces were minted

1832 – 3 pieces were minted

1833 Large Date – 5 pieces were minted

Collecting Capped Bust $5    

The Capped Bust $5 can be pricey – much like any US Gold Coins. For the Type 1 series, variations include 1808/7 and 1809/8 overdates aside from the different-sized dates and denominations. One can buy PCGS-graded Type 1 Capped Bust $5 in Mint State from $1,750.00-300,000.00.

One can buy PCGS-graded Type 2 Capped Bust $5 in Mint State from $3,250.00-$850,000.00 and for $1,000,000.00-$2,000,000.00 Proofs.

One can buy PCGS-graded Type 3 Capped Bust $5 in Mint State from $18,500.00-$600,000.00 and for $175,000.00-$1,500,000.00 for Proofs.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, USA Coin Book

The Draped Bust $5

In 1795, the US Mint Director David Rittenhouse was succeeded by Henry DeSaussure. The aforementioned wanted to improve the design of the coin currently in circulation, so he appointed Robert Scot, current US Mint Chief Engraver of that time to get the designs ready. By the 31st of July of the same year, brand new $5 coins emerged as Half Eagles – the very first series of Gold Coins minted by the United States Mint.

Scot featured Miss Liberty facing right with her hair arranged while wearing a large cap. Ten stars are on the left side of the obverse while five stars are on the left after the word LIBERTY. The date is then inscribed on the bottom of the obverse.

As for the reverse, a small Eagle was holding a wreath on its beak while clutching on a palm branch. This very design of the Eagle was often referred to as the “Chicken Eagle” by numismatics nowadays. The Eagle is surrounded by the inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and with no denomination. This design is known as the Type 1 Small Eagle Draped Bust $5 and was minted from 1795-1798.

The second type was dated from 1795-1807 and came to be known as the Type 2 Heraldic Eagle even if the new design for the reverse first appeared in 1797. The US Mint tried to save the leftover dies from the 1795 obverse die and used that on the new Draped Bust $5. As a result, there were some new $5 gold coins that had overdates on them.

The Type 2 $5 Gold Coin features a Heraldic Eagle with the Great Seal of the United States on its chest. It was clutching an olive branch and three arrows on its talons while a ribbon is seen on its beak with the legend E PLURIBUS UNUM written on it. Just above the head of the Eagle is an arc of the cloud surrounding 13 stars. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds the Eagle and no denomination is marked on the coin.

All coins were minted in the US Mint in Philadelphia. The Draped Bust $5 has a reeded edge, weighs about 8.75 grams, are 25 millimeters in diameter and were made from 91.7% Gold and 8.3% Copper. Most Gold coins were melted by 1834 as the price for its bullion value exceed the coins’ face value. A population of Gold coins we have nowadays in very scarce and high-graded conditions.

Variations and Mintages of the Draped Bust $5

Type 1 Small Eagle Draped Bust $5

These were minted for four years – from 1795-1798 and with no Proof coins produced. The number of stars changed over the years on the obverse of the coin.

Regular Strike

1795 Small Eagle – 8,707 pieces were minted

1796/5 Small Eagle – 6,196 pieces were minted

1797 Small Eagle, 16 Stars Obverse – 2,552 pieces were minted

1797 Small Eagle, 15 Stars Obverse – 2,552 pieces were minted

1798 Small Eagle -100 pieces were minted

Type 2 Heraldic Eagle Draped Bust $5

The second type of the Draped Bust $5 were date 1795-1807. Variations included small and large stars, and a different number of stars on both reverse and obverse.

Regular Strike

1795 Large Eagle – 500 pieces were minted

1797 – 1,057 pieces were minted

  •    1797 Large Eagle, 15 St Obverse
  •    1797 Large Eagle, 16 St Obverse
  •    1797/5 Large Eagle

1798 – 24,867 pieces were minted

  •    1798 Large 8, 13 St Reverse
  •    1798 Small 8
  •    1798 Large 8, 14 St Reverse

1799 – 7,451 pieces were minted

  •    1799 Large Stars Reverse
  •    1799 Small Stars Reverse

1800 – 37,628 pieces were minted

1802 – 53,176 pieces were minted

  •    1802/1

1803 – 33,506 pieces were minted

  •    1803/2

1804 – 30,475 pieces were minted

  •    1804 Small 8
  •    1804 Small 8 over Large 8
  •    1804 Private Restrike J-30

1805 – 33,183 pieces were minted

1806 – 54,417 pieces were minted

  •    1806 Round 6, 7X6 Stars
  •    1806 Pointed 6, 8X5 Stars

1807 Bust Right – 9,676 pieces were minted

Collecting Draped Bust $5

All dates for the Type 1 Small Eagle $5 are considered scarce and valuable, with the 1978 Small Eagle $5 regarded as one of the most desirable among all US Gold Coins. Two interesting varieties of Type 1 are the 1796/5 overdate and the 1795 that has the last S in STATES was accidentally striked with a D so the Mint had to punch it again with the final S. one can buy PCGS-graded Type 1 Small Eagle Draped Bust $5 from $15,000.00 and up to $645,000.00.

As for the Type 2 Heraldic Eagle Draped Bust $5, there are no coins minted and dated in 1801. There are two varieties to collect – both coins date 1797, one with 15 stars and the other with 16 stars on the obverse. Despite the melting of the majority of the US Gold coins in 1834, Mint States Type 2 Draped Bust $5 are quite plentiful. one can buy PCGS-graded Type 2 Heraldic Eagle Draped Bust $5 from $2,000.00-$440,000.00.

The Draped Bust $2.5

It was in 1796 that the first Quarter Eagles were introduced to the public. During this time, the denomination $2.5 is considered to be a substantial amount of money. Despite its value, Quarter Eagles as these Gold Coins were called, were not that in demand compared to other coins. The reason behind this was that the Draped Bust $2.5 gold coin was very small for transactions at the bank but too big for daily commerce.

Robert Scot, the US Mint Chief Engraver of that time created the design for the Draped Bust $2.5. The obverse features a portrait of Miss Liberty facing right. She can be seen wearing a soft cap, the legend LIBERTY inscribed on top of the portrait while the date 1796 is right below. The soft cap that Miss Liberty is seen wearing used to be associated as a Phrygian Cap. However, in 1825, the cap was confirmed to be that of a headdress that was quite popular during the 1790s.

For the reverse, the Draped Bust $2.5 has a Heraldic Eagle Design. The Eagle has the Great Seal of the United States on its breast, with clouds in a form of an arc in between the Eagle’s wings. The clouds are enclosing 16 stars. Around the margin lies the inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Inside the ribbon held by the Eagle’s mouth are the words E PLURIBUS UNUM and its talons clutching a single olive branch and three arrows.

This design came to be known as the Type 1 No Stars Draped Bust $2.5. It has a reeded edge, weighs approximately 4.37 grams, is 20 millimeters in diameter and is made up of 91.7% Gold and 8.3% Copper.

After only less than 1,000 pieces were minted, a new designed emerged wherein the obverse now has 13 stars – 6 on the left and 7 on the right symbolizing the original states. From then on, the position of the stars that appeared on the obverse varies almost every year while the number of stars in the reverse changes between 13-16 stars. These came to be the Type 2 Stars on Obverse Draped Bust $2.5 and were minted from 1796-1807. Both Type 1 and Type 2 Draped Bust $2.5 were minted in the Philadelphia Mint.

Varieties and Mintage of the Draped Bust $2.5

Type 1 No Stars Draped Bust $2.5

The first type of the Draped Bust $2.5 was minted only in the year 1796.

Regular Strike

1796 No Stars Draped Bust $2.5 – 963 pieces were minted

Type 2 Stars on Obverse Draped Bust $2.5

The second type of the Draped Bust $2.5 was minted from the year 1796 up until 1807. The obverse now has stars on each side of Miss Liberty. The number of stars varies and there were also other variations like overdates and close or wide dates.

Regular Strike

1796 Stars – 432 pieces were minted

1797 – 427 pieces were minted

1798 Close Date – 1,094 pieces were minted

1798 Wide Date – 1,094 pieces were minted

1802/’1′ – 3,035 pieces were minted

1804 13 Stars Reverse – 500 pieces were minted

1804 14 Stars Reverse – 2,827 pieces were minted

1805 – 1,781 pieces were minted

1806/4 8X5 Stars – 1,136 pieces were minted

1806/5 7X6 Stars – 480 pieces were minted

1807 – 6,812 pieces were minted

Collecting Draped Bust $2.5

Despite its short years of production, the Draped Bust $2.5 has a number of varieties that collectors would enjoy collecting. There are a total of 13 varieties while the total number of coins produced equals to no more than 20,000 pieces. No proofs were minted. The 1797 issue now only has 20 survivors out of the 427 pieces minted in the US Mint while the 13 stars variety only has 9 survivors. As for the most popular Draped Bust $2.5 among numismatics, 1796 $2.5 is the key date.

One can buy PCGS-graded Draped Bust $2.5 from $3,750.00-$1,750,000.00 – the highest price belonging to a Type 1 No Stars 1796. Other high-priced Quarter Eagles are those dated 1796 Stars on Obverse, 1798 Close Date and 1807.

References:

PCGS, USA Coin Book, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin

The Capped Head $2.5 or the Classic Head $2.5

After the last Capped Bust $2.5 was minted in the year 1834, a new demand for the Quarter Eagle came as a surprise to US Mint officials. To answer the need for $2.5 coins, US Mint Chief Engraver Robert Scot used a design he borrowed from his Half Eagle in 1818. His old age and poor eyesight made him unable to create an original one.

The obverse features Miss Liberty facing left while wearing a mobcap inscribed with the legend LIBERTY across it. The headdress was commonly worn by 19th-century women. 13 stars surround the coin while the date is below Miss Liberty.

For the reverse, the Heraldic Eagle with the Great Seal on its chest is still featured while its talons are clutching an olive branch and three arrows. The legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA encircles half of the reverse while the denomination 2 1/2D. lays under the Eagle. E PLURIBUS UNUM was purposely removed from the design in order to easily distinguish the ole and new issues.

The Capped Head $2.5 were minted from 1834 up until 1839. It has a reeded edge, weighs 4.37 grams, and is made up of 91,7% Gold and 8.3% Copper. However, there were 2 designers for the Capped Head. From 1821-1828, Robert Scot’s Capped Head Quarter Eagle is 18.5 mm in diameter while William Kneass reduced the diameter down to 18.2 mm for the series dated 1829-1834. Kneass also used smaller letters and stars while creating a beaded border surrounded by raised rims.

Varieties and Mintages of the Capped Head $2.5

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1834-G$2½-Capped Head (reduced), Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC0 1.0

Regular Strike

1834 Classic Head – 112,234 pieces were minted

1835 -131,402 pieces were minted

1836 Script 8 – 547,986 pieces were minted

1836 Block 8 – 547,986 pieces were minted

1837 – 45,080 pieces were minted

1838 – 47,030 pieces were minted

1838-C – 7,880 pieces were minted

1839 – 27,021 pieces were minted

1839-C – 18,140 pieces were minted

1839-D – 13,674 pieces were minted

1839-O – 17,781 pieces were minted

Proofs

1834 Classic Head – 10 pieces were minted

1835 – 8 pieces were minted

1836 – 5 pieces were minted

1837 – 3 pieces were minted

1838 – 2 pieces were minted

1839 – 5 pieces were minted

Collecting Capped Head $2.5

With Capped Head Quarter Eagles, there are no famous rarities noted. However, the 1838-C is noted as the most sought after in the series thanks to its low number of coins produced.

PCGS-graded Capped Head $2.5 coins can be bought in Mint State for as low as $340.00 up to $235,000.00 – the highest grade and price belonging to an MS67 1838 Capped Head Quarter Eagle. For Proofs, the lowest one can buy is at $45,000.00 for 1837 Capped Head $2.5 in PR60 and highest for up to $600,000.00 for the 1836 Capped Head Quarter Eagle in DCAM66.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, USA CoinBook, Rare Coin Wholesalers, NGC Coin

The Capped Bust $2.5

By the year 1807, US Mint Director Robert Pattinson wrote a letter to then-President Thomas Jefferson in order to promote John Reich as Robert Scot’s assistant. Pattinson was worried that Scot might die anytime soon, leaving the position vulnerable with no one properly trained to take the post. After some time, Reich was tasked to create new designs for the US coins.

For the new Quarter Eagle, Reich created a design wherein Miss Liberty is now facing left while a mob cap is seen on top of her head and the legend LIBERTY inscribed on it. 7 stars are in a form of an arc on the left side of the obverse while 6 are on the right.

For the reverse, the Heraldic Eagle is still featured but now has a more naturalistic bird with the Great Seal on its chest. The Eagle is now perched on an olive branch while it is clutching three arrows with its talons. E PLURIBUS UNUM is inscribed on a ribbon placed just above the Eagle. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is in a form of an arc almost touching the margin while the denomination 2 ½ D lies below the Eagle. Due to the elements being sunk in the die incompletely, most coins have weak borders.

All Capped Bust $2.5 were minted in the US Mint in Philadelphia and bears no mint marks. These were coined from 1807-1834 with only 3 Proofs. It has a reeded edge, weighs 4.37 grams, is 20 mm in diameter, and is made up of 91.7% Gold and 8.3% Copper.

There are 3 Types for the Capped Bust $2.5

Type 1 Large Cap Capped Bust $2.5

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1808-G$2½-Capped Bust (left), Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The first type was only minted in the year 1808 with no Proofs. No clear reason was recorded as to why this type only lasted the same year it started, and as a result, it came to be one of the most sought-after US coins. It has a diameter of 20mm which will later change in the following years.

Regular Strike

1808 Large Cap Capped Bust $2.5 – 2,710 pieces were minted

Type 2 Small Cap, Large Diameter Capped Bust $2.5

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1821-G$2½-Capped Head, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The second type now features a smaller cap on Miss Liberty’s head and the stars surround her profile bust to form a perfect semi-circle. A new die was introduced which resulted in a slightly smaller in diameter. From 20mm, the diameter went down to 18.50mm. The mintages were minuscule since the number of coins produced only depended on the demand. The Type 2 Capped Bust was minted in 1821, 1824, 1825, 1826 and 1827 with only 1 proof date – 1821.

Regular Strike

1821 – 6,448 pieces were minted

1824/1 – 2,600 pieces were minted

1825 – 4,434 pieces were minted

1826/’5′ – 760 pieces were minted

1827 – 2,800 pieces were minted

Proofs

1821 – 7 pieces were minted

Type 3 Small Diameter Capped Bust $2.5

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1829-5C-Capped Bust, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The third and last Type of the Capped Bust $2.5 was created with a beaded border while inside a raised rim. Letters and stars were struck in a slightly smaller size. These were minted from 1829-1834 with 2 Proof.

Regular Strike

1829 – 3,403 pieces were minted

1830 – 4,540 pieces were minted

1831 – 4,520 pieces were minted

1832 – 4,400 pieces were minted

1833 – 4,160 pieces were minted

1834 Capped Bust – 4,000 pieces were minted

Proofs

1831 – 10 pieces were minted

1833 – 5 pieces were minted

Collecting Capped Bust $2.5

When it comes to Capped Bust $2.5, the rarest one of them all is the last series minted – those dated in 1834. Considering the low mintages, the bullion value of gold coins rose more than its face value resulting in many gold coins including the Capped Bust $2.5 be melted or sold. The 1808 Capped Bust is considered as the most sought-after in US numismatics.  

PCGS-graded Capped Bust $2.5 prices depend on the type and year the coins were minted. For the type 1, one can buy them from $30,000.00-$2,350,000.00. No Proofs were minted for the type 1.

For type 2 Capped Bust, price starts at $6,500.00-$550,000.00 for the Mint States. As for proofs, price starts at $65,000.00-$325,000.00.

For type 3, price starts at $5,250.00-$475,000.00 for MS and from $35,000.00-$185,000.00 for Proofs. Those dated in 1834 has a significantly higher premium than any other dates in the series

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coin Facts, NCG Coin, My Coin Guides

The Gold Dollar

The smallest denomination made out of Gold in the United States history of coinage belongs to no other than the Gold Dollar. It was a regular issued $1 Gold Coin minted from 1849-1899 despite the fact that minting was prohibited from 1861 until 1865 – the time of the Civil War. Thanks to the iconic California Gold Rush, the US Government was able to create coins made of Gold.

Robert M. Patterson, the US Mint Director at that time was not very keen on the idea of creating mint-issued gold dollars. However, his opposition failed to stop Gold Coins from being approved when the Congress passed a legislation on March 3, 1849. The Coin Act of 1849 authorized the created and minting of Gold $1 Coins and $20 Gold Coins which are also known as Double Eagles.

The Gold Dollar has three types: The Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar, The Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head and The Type 3 Indian Princes Large Head. All three types were designed by James B. Longacre, the US Mint Chief Engraver.

Gold Dollar is composed of 90% Gold and 10% Copper. It weighs about 1.70 grams and has a reeded edge. As for the diameter, the Type 1 is 12.70mm while both Type 2 and 3 are 14.30mm.

The Three Types of Gold Dollar (Varieties, Mintmarks, and Mintages)

Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar

The first design for the Gold $1 Coin was known as the Liberty Head. It was first struck in 1849 and lasted until 1854.

Image courtesy of , 1849 G$1 Open Wreath (obv), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY 4.0

The head of Miss Liberty facing left was featured on the obverse. She’s seen wearing a headband where the word LIBERTY was inscribed and she’s being surrounded by a total of 13 stars.

Image courtesy of , 1849 G$1 Closed Wreath (rev), size, CC BY 4.0

For the reverse, the denomination written 1 DOLLAR along with the date is surrounded by a wreath. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is placed in a form of an arc just above the wreath while the mintmark sits just below the wreath.

The Liberty Head Gold Dollar was minted in five US Mints – Philadelphia, Dahlonega, New Orleans, Charlotte and San Francisco. Each coin bears the mintmark of the respective mints where they were produced except for Philadelphia. S for those minted in San Francisco, D for Dahlonega, O for New Orleans and C for Charlotte.

The US Mints in Dahlonega and Philadelphia are the only ones that issued the Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar yearly from 1849-1854. Despite this, it was the Philadelphia Mint and the in New Orleans that have a much higher mintage among the five. The lowest number of Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollars minted in a US Mint is in the Dahlonega Mint. Proof coins were made in 1849 and 1850, but there was a rumored Liberty Head Proof minted in the year 1851 and 1854.

Regular Strike

1849 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 688,567 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  •    1849 No L
  •    1849 Open Wreath
  •    1849 Closed Wreath

1849-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 11,634 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

  •    1849-C Closed Wreath
  •    1849-C Open Wreath

1849-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 21,588 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1849-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 21,588pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1850 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 481,953 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1850-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 6,966 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

1850-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 8,382 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1850-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 14,000 pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1851 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 3,317,671 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1851-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 41,267 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

1851-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 9,882 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1851-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 290,000 pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1852 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 2,045,351 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1852-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 9,434 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

1852-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 6,360 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1852-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 140,000 pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1853 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 4,076,051 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1853-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 11,515 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

1853-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 6,583 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1853-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 290,000 pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1854 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 855,502 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1854-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 2,935 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1854-S Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 14,632 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs

1849 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar (Proof) – 10 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1850 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar (Proof) – 2 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollar

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1854-G$1-Indian head (Ty2), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The second type of the Gold Dollar was born in 1854. When the US Mint Director Robert Patterson was succeeded by James Ross Snowden, he agreed with critics that the very small size of the Gold Dollar which was only about 13 mm made it very easy to lose. Many have argued years before that a new design be made for the Gold Dollar – it should be bigger in diameter and have a center hole to compensate for the weight.

Test strikes were actually made but when Snowden became the US Mint Director, he had something else in mind. He approved of a bigger Gold Dollar in terms of diameter, but instead of putting a hole in the center of the coin, the coins will be made thinner to compensate for the weight.

Snowden then appointed Longacre to modify his Liberty Head Gold Dollar in 2854. Longacre actually based the designed f the new Gold Dollar which came to be known as the Indian Princess, Small Head on the design he made for the $3 Gold. The new Gold Dollar was then first minted in 1854 – larger in diameter for about 15%.

Lost Dutchman Rare Coins for image, James B. Longacre for coin, 1854 gold dollar type 2 obverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

For the obverse, Longacre featured a portrait of a woman wearing a fancy Indian headdress. She was facing right and her head has a smaller size compared to the Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar. Stars no longer surround the portrait and were replaced with the inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Lost Dutchman Rare Coins for image, James B. Longacre for coin, 1854 gold dollar type 2 reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

As for the reverse, the wreath got bigger as if filled the space where the inscription used to be.

The Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars were minted in five US Mints – each bearing the respective mintmark of where they were produced. The total number of coins minted were barely 1.6 million pieces – wherein Philadelphia Mint has the highest mintages.

The Type 2 Gold Dollar only lasted until 1856 due to a problem encountered when striking the coin. The high relief of the coin’s obverse was too high which resulted to some details on the head of the coin – especially the date, the word DOLLAR and sharp details on the female’s head are not very visible.

Regular Strike

1854 Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 783,943 pieces minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1855 Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 758,269 pieces minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1855-C Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 9,803 pieces minted at the Charlotte Mint

1855-D Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 1,811 pieces minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1855-O Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 55,000 pieces minted at the New Orleans Mint

1856-S Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 24,600 pieces minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs

1854 Type 2 Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars (Proof) – 5 pieces minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1855 Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars (Proof) – 12 pieces minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollars

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1856-G$1-Indian head (Ty3), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The 3rd type of the Gold Dollar was created in 1856 after the Type 2 proved to be deteriorating rapidly causing lots of coins to be dateless. And so, Longacre went to increase the portrait’s size, although the design was essentially the same.

The obverse still featured the so-called Indian Princess and the inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounding the portrait, but Longacre made the portrait bigger than the Type 2, the Indian Princess’ hair arranged differently, the headdress in a horizontal plane while the inscription was kept closer to the coin’s border. The reverse stayed the same.

These were minted in Philadelphia, Dahlonega, Charlotte and San Francisco. The third type proved to be the best design for the Gold Dollar thanks to its durability. After more than three decades, the Gold Dollar had its final wave in 1889.

Regular Strike

1856 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,762,936 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1856 Slanted 5
  •    1856 Upright 5

1856-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,460 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1857 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 774,789 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1857-C Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 13,280 pieces minted in Charlotte

1857-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,533 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1857-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 10,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1858 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 117,995 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1858-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,477 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1858-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 10,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1859 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 168,244 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1859-C Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,235 pieces minted in Charlotte

1859-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 4,952 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1859-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 15,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1860 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 36,514 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1860-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,566 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1860-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 13,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1861 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 527,150 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1861-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – Unknown, minted in Dahlonega

1862 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,361,355 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1863 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 6,200 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1864 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1865 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,700 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1866 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 7,100 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1867 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,200 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1868 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 10,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1869 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1870 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 6,300 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1870-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1871 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1872 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1873 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 125,100 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1873 Open 3
  •    1873 Closed 3

1874 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 198,800 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1875 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 400 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1876 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,200 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1877 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1878 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1879 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1880 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,600 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1881 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 7,620 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1882 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1883 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 10,800 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1884 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,230 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1885 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 11,156 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1886 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1887 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 7,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1888 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 15,501 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1889 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 28,950 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Proofs

1856 Slanted 5 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 15 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1857 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1858 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 40 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1859 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 80 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1860 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 154 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1861 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 349 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1862 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 35 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1863 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 50 minted in Philadelphia

1864 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 50 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1865 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 25 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1866 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 30 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1867 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 50 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1868 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 25 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1869 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 25 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1870 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 35 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1871 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 30 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1872 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 30 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1873 Closed 3 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 25 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1874 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1875 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1876 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 45 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1877 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1878 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1879 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 30 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1880 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 36 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1881 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 87 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1882 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 125pieces minted in Philadelphia

1883 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 207 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1884 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,006 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1885 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,105 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1886 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,016 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1887 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,043 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1888 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,079 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1889 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,779 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Collecting Gold Dollars

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1849-G$1-Liberty head (Ty1), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

For Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollars, one can easily find a complete date set, but one will find that collecting date and mintmark sets are harder to find thanks to the rarities and varieties one needs to obtain. The rare varieties are the Type 1 Liberty Gold Dollars minted at the Charlotte and Dahlonega Mints, each bearing C and D mintmarks respectively. The most in-demand coin by collectors being the 1849-C Open Wreath Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar.

For Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars, these very much in demand among coin collectors especially those in GEM conditions. The rarest among them being the 1855-D.

As for Type 3, the most wanted is the 1856-D and 1861-D being the rarest of them all to find in MS conditions.

When grading Gold Coins, the places to look for signs of wear are the hair near the coronet and the tips of the wreath’s leaves for Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollars. For Type 2 Indian Princess Small Head are the areas of the Indian Princess’ hair over her eye and the ribbon’s knot at the base of the wreath. As for Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar, check for the Indian Princess’ cheeks as well as her eye and the ribbon’s knot at the base of the wreath.

One can purchase PCGS-graded Type 1 Gold Dollars starting $230.00-$135,000.00 for Mint State coins and $130,000.00-$400,000.00 for Proofs.

For Type 2 Gold Dollars, $300.00-$195,000.00 for Mint State coins and $125,000.00-$400,000.00 for Proofs.

For Type 3 Gold Dollars, $255.00-$150,000.00 for Mint State coins and $2,750.00-$75,000.00 for Proofs.

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coin Facts, NGC Coin, My Coin Guides, Coin Community

The Saint Gaudens $20 Gold Coin

The Saint Gaudens $20 Gold Coin, an undeniably beautiful coin with a spectacular design was created thanks to President Theodore Roosevelt’s unique relationship with a popular sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens. President Roosevelt has always been an advocate for quintessential change, and the US coinage system became one of his subjects. Because of him, many coins were redesigned, including the $20 Liberty Head Gold Coin.

Since President Roosevelt has already been pleased with  Saint-Gaudens’ works and designs, he asked him to create a new design for the $20 Gold Coin, to which Saint-Gaudens gingerly accepted. They exchanged many letters discussing the design the Saint-Gaudens will make, and President Roosevelt’s idea was to raise the rim as an added protection and to strike the coin in high relief. The inspiration was taken from coins found in Ancient Greece.

Months later, the models were being prepared, but some US Mint Officials were not so keen on redesigning the $20 Gold Coin. US Mint Chief Engraver Charles E. Barber was particularly opposed to the idea, stating the idea was impractical, but mainly because an outsider was hand-picked by the president to create the design instead of him. However, Roosevelt went on with his decision and officially appointed Saint-Gaudens to carry on.

The obverse features a full-length portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a gown in full stride. She was holding an olive branch on her left hand and a torch on her right hand. Rays of sunlight are seen behind her while the word LIBERTY is on top of her portrait in a form of an arc. The United States Capitol can be seen on her lower left and the date written in Roman Numerals MCMVII on her right, with Saint-Gaudens’ monogram just below the date. A total of 46 stars are scattered surrounding Miss Liberty.

For the reverse, an Eagle is seen midflight, with the rays of the sun below it extending up towards the Eagle. Two tiers are seen just above the Eagle – the inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA just above the denomination TWENTY DOLLARS. It lacks the motto IN GOD WE TRUST as President Roosevelt felt that money can easily be used in illegal and ungodly pursuits. However, the Congress passed an Act that mandated all US coins to include the motto IN GOD WE TRUST. The Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins were struck with the motto latter in 1908.

Saint-Gaudens was terminally ill during this time. He was diagnosed with cancer and his condition is slowly killing him. The good things were he was assisted by his trusted assistant, Henry Herning. The new $20 Gold Coins were eventually struck in high reliefs. Saint-Gaudens, unfortunately, died before the coin was even produced.

The US Mint still declined of the idea as the original design created by Saint-Gaudens needed more than 6 blows in order to create a single coin – some in wide rims and other with flat rims. After only 22 pieces of the new $20 Gold Coin were minted in Ultra-High Relief, the dies have already cracked because of the amount of pressure exerted on the coins. It was believed that two of these $20 Gold Coins were melted and the remaining were distributed. Although the original Ultra High-Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins were patterns, these were still considered as a regular coinage and is the most popular variety of the series.

The next $20 Gold was struck in modified, low-relief coins. Because of the strikingly beautiful appearance of the High-Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins, they became an instant hit and were worth $30.00 within weeks after these were issued and released. It has become one of the most desired coins among all US coins.

A total of 11,250 pieces of high-relief coins were struck before the modified version was released. The Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin, also known as Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle were struck from 1907-1916, then again in 1920-1932 in US Mints located in Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco. These were made up of 90% Gold, 10% Copper, weighs 33.40g, has a diameter of 34mm and have lettered edges.

Thanks to the many modifications made on the design of the Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin, 4 types of these Double Eagles were born.

The Four Types of Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin acc. To PCGS Coin Facts

  1.    Ultra-High Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin (1907)
    Coin: Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Image by Lost Dutchman Rare Coins, 1907 Saint-Gaudens double eagle high relief obverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

    Coin: Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Image by Lost Dutchman Rare Coins, 1907 Saint-Gaudens double eagle high relief reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

The very first and original models made by Augustus Saint-Gaudens were struck in Ultra-High Relief as a request by President Roosevelt. These were patters most sought-after by gold coin collectors.

Proofs:

1907 Extremely High Relief Lettered Edge – 22 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 EX-HR Plain Edge – 1 coin minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 EX-HR Inverted Edge Letters – 2 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  1.    Type 1 High Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin (1907)

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1907-G$20-Saint Gaudens (Roman, high relief), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The US Mint decided to strike the coins in a relief slight lower than the patterns as the dies literally cracked after just many coins were striked.

Regular Strike:

1907 High Relief-Wire Edge – 11,250 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 High Relief-Flat Edge – mintage n/a

  1.    Type 2 No Motto Arabic Numerals Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin (1907-1908)

The Type 1 High Relief proved to be impractical after mass production of the Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin ensued, so the US Mint striked the next issue with low relief. Arabic Numerals replaced the Roman Numeral during this time.

Regular Strikes:

1907 Saint – 361,667 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1908 No Motto – 4,271,551 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1908-D No Motto – 663,750 coins minted at the Denver Mint

Proofs:

1907 Saint Large Edge Letters – 3 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 Saint Small Edge Letters – 3 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  1.    Type 3 With Motto Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1908-D-G$20-Saint Gaudens (Arabic & motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

President Roosevelt was opposed to incorporating the motto IN GOD WE TRUST in the US Coinage with the belief that money can be used in illegal and ungodly practices, often reaching casinos and bars. However, the Congress passed a legislation that obliged the US Mint to include the motto in every coin. Thus, Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins struck in 1908 after the act was passed had the motto included in the decision. It was situated just below the Eagle.

Regular Strikes:

1908 Motto -156,258 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1908-D Motto -349,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1908-S -22,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1909 -161,215 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1909/8 -161,215 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1909-D -52,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1909-S -2,774,925 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1910 -482,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1910-D -429,000 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1910-S -2,128,250 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1911 -197,200 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1911-D -846,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1911-S -775,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1912 -149,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1913 -168,780 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1913-D -393,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1913-S -34,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1914 -95,250 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1914-D -453,000 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1914-S -1,498,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1915 -152,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1915-S -567,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1916-S -796,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1920 -228,250 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1920-S -558,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1921 -528,500 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1922 -1,375,500 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1922-S -2,658,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1923 -566,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1923-D -1,702,250 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1924 -4,323,500 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1924-D -3,049,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1924-S -2,927,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1925 -2,831,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1925-D -2,938,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1925-S -3,776,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1926 -816,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1926-D -481,000 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1926-S -2,041,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1927 -2,946,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1927-D -180,000 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1927-S -3,107,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1928 -8,816,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1929 -1,779,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1930-S -74,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1931 -2,938,250 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1931-D -106,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1932 -1,101,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1933 -445,500 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Proofs:

1908 Motto Matte – 101 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1908 Roman Finish – 1 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1909 – 57 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1910 – 167 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1911 -100 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1912 – 74 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1913 – 58 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1914 – 70 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1915 – 50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Collecting Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin

Always look for signs of wear on Miss Liberty’s chest, her knee as well as the Eagle’s wing. As one may have known by now, the most valuable Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin is one with the original design struck in Ultra High Relief.

Average coin collectors may find it very expensive to collect High-Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins. However, typeset Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins with and without Motto can be purchased at a modest price.

Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin dated 1907 and 1933 are the most expensive ones to watch out for. The 1909/8 overdate is also a popular coin thanks to its error. Gold coin collectors, however, are still keen on collecting gold coins with low mintages like the 1913-S, 1914, 1915, 1930-S and 1931-D.

According to PCGS, Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins can be purchased between $1,330.00-600,000.00 for Regular Strike coins. Proof coins would be much higher in price.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, Coin World, My Coin Guides

The Liberty Head $20 Gold Coin

The Liberty Head $20 Gold Coin or the Liberty Head Double Eagle Gold Coin is a beautiful coin that gives coin collectors the satisfaction when collecting the series. For one, being the first of its kind and the fact that it is made out of gold makes it valuable. As the largest circulation coin struck in gold in the US, almost all Liberty Head $20 Double Eagle is sought after among coin collectors regardless of their date and type.

After the discovery of Gold in January 1848 in California, thousands of people came to find their luck. Because of the spectacular amount of Gold found, the era of the California Gold Rush was born. Because of this, the Treasury Department of the United States made a decision to create gold coins. From Quarter Eagles ($2.50), Half Eagles ($5) and Eagles ($10). On March 3, 1849, another legislation was passed to create gold coins that are bigger in size than the previous issue. These were called the Double Eagle and has a denomination of $20.

The Liberty Head Double Eagle was struck from 1849-1907. It has three different types – three different reverses were made by US Mint Chief Engraver James Barton Longacre. The reason behind the many designs for the reverse of the Liberty Double Eagle was because of conspiracy.

The US Mint Director at that time, Robert Maskell Patterson wanted to replace Longacre with Charles Cushington Wright – a well-known medalist. Patterson teamed up with US Mint Chief Coiner Franklin Peale and went on harassing poor Longacre. He was forced to create three different designs for the obverse, and the three types of the Liberty Head Double Eagle was born.

The Three Varieties of Liberty Head $20 Gold Coin

  1.    Type 1 No Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1849-G$20-Liberty Head (Twenty D.), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Designed by James B. Longacre, it was first struck in the year 1849. The Type 1 No Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle Coins were minted at the Philadelphia Mint from the year 1949-1865. At the San Francisco Mint, coins were minted from 1854 to 1866 while the New Orleans Mint produced Type 1 No Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle Coins from 1850 to 1861. Coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint bears no mintmark while those minted at San Francisco and New Orleans had the mintmark S and O respectively.

The coin is made up of 90% Gold, and 10% Copper. It has a reeded edge, weighs approximately 33.40g and has a diameter of 34mm. For the obverse, Longracre used a portrait similar to the gold dollar issued in 1849 to 1854. He created a portrait of Miss Liberty with half of her hair pulled up in a bun. She was wearing a coronet that has the word LIBERTY inscribed. 13 stars surround her portrait in a form of an arc while the date is seen below.

As for the reverse, an Eagle is featured on the center with a shield on its chest. It is clutching arrows and an olive branch using its talons. Stars and rays are seen above the Eagle while ornaments surrounds its sides. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA can be seen on top of the coin in a form of an arc while the denomination TWENTY D. is on the bottom. The mintmark is found just above the denomination.

The following are the Regular Strikes of the Type 1 No Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle:

1850 – 1,170,261 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1850-O -141,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1851 -2,087,155 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1851-O –315,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1852 -2,053,026 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1852-O -190,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1853 -1,261,326 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1853/’2′ Overdate -1,261,326 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1853-O -71,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1854 Small Date -757,899 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1854 Large Date -757,899 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1854-O -3,250 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1854-S -141,468 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1855 -364,666 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1855-O -8,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1855-S -879,675 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1856 -329,878 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1856-O -2,250 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1856-S -1,189,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1857 -439,375 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1857-O -30,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1857-S -970,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1858 -211,714 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1858-O – 35,250 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1858-S -846,710 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1859 -43,597 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1859-O -9,100 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1859-S -636,445 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1860 -577,670 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1860-O -6,600 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1860-S -544,950 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1861 -2,976,453 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1861 Paquet -2,976,453 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1861-O -17,741 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1861-S -748,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1861-S Paquet -19,250 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1862 -92,133 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1862-S -854,173 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1863 -142,790 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1863-S -966,570 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1864 -204,235 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1864-S -793,660 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1865 -351,175 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1865-S -1,042,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1866-S No Motto -12,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs:

1849 – n/a

1850 -3 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1854 -2 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1856 –n/a

1857 –n/a

1858 -5 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1859 -50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1860 -59 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1861 -66 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1862 -35 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1863 -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1864 -50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1865 -25 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Special Strikes:

1854-S -1 coin minted at the San Francisco Mint

1856-O -2 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  1.    Type 2 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle with TWENTY D. on Reverse

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1866-G$20-Liberty Head (motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Type 2 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle was born after the Mint Act of 1865 was passed which included the provision where the motto IN GOD WE TRUST be included on the US coins. Longacre added the motto IN GOD WE TRUST in the reverse side of the coin and retained the denomination written as TWENTY D. The Type 2 Liberty Head Double Eagle was struck from the year 1866 up to 1876 in Philadelphia, San Francisco and Carson City.

Regular Strikes of the Type 2 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle with TWENTY D. on Reverse

1866 Motto -698,745 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1866-S Motto -830,250 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1867 -251,015 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1867-S -920,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1868 -98,575 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1868-S -837,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1869 -175,130 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1869-S -686,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1870 -155,150 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1870-CC -3,789 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1870-S -982,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1871 -80,120 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1871-CC -17,387 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1871-S -928,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1872 -251,850 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1872-CC -26,900 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1872-S -780,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1873 Closed 3 -1,709,800 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1873 Open 3 -1,709,800 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1873-CC -22,410 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1873-S Closed 3 -1,040,600 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1873-S Open 3 -1,040,600 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1874 -366,780 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1874-CC -115,085 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1874-S -1,214,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1875 -295,720 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1875-CC -111,151 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1875-S -1,230,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1876 -583,860 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1876-CC -138,441 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1876-S -1,597,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs

1866 Motto -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1867 -50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1868 -25 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1869 -25 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1870 -35 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1871 -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1872 -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1873 Closed 3 -25 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1874 -20 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1875 -20 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1876 -45 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  1.    Type 3 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle with TWENTY DOLLARS on Reverse

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1877-G$20-Liberty Head (Twenty Dollars & motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

From 1877 to 1907, the motif of the reverse was once again changed and updated. It still has the same obverse like the two previous designs, and still has the motto IN GOD WE TRUST incorporated. However, for the Type 3, Miss Liberty’s head was tilted forward and the denomination was no longer as TWENTY D. but as TWENTY DOLLARS. These were minted in Philadelphia, San Francisco (mintmark S), New Orleans (mint mark O), Denver (mintmark D) and Carson City (mintmark CC).

Regular Strikes of the Type 3 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle with TWENTY DOLLARS on Reverse

1877 -397,650 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1877-CC -42,565 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1877-S -1,735,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1878 -543,625 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1878-CC -13,180 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1878-S -1,739,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1879 -207,600 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1879-CC -10,708 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1879-O -2,325 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1879-S -1,233,800 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1880 -51,420 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1880-S -836,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1881 -2,199 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1881-S -727,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1882 -571 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1882-CC -39,140 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1882-S -1,125,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1883-CC -59,962 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1883-S -1,189,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1884-CC -81,139 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1884-S -916,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1885 -751 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1885-CC -9,450 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1885-S -683,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1886 -1,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1887-S -283,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1888 -226,161 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1888-S -859,600 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1889 -44,070 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1889-CC -30,945 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1889-S -774,700 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1890 -75,940 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1890-CC -91,209 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1890-S -802,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1891 -1,390 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1891-CC -5,000 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1891-S -1,288,125 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1892 -4,430 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1892-CC -27,265 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1892-S -930,150 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1893 -344,280 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1893-CC -18,402 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1893-S -996,175 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1894 -1,368,940 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1894-S -1,048,550 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1895 -1,114,605 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1895-S -1,143,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1896 -792,535 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1896-S -1,403,925 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1897 -1,383,175 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1897-S -1,470,250 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1898 -170,395 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1898-S -2,575,175 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1899 -1,669,300 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1899-S -2,010,300 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1900 -1,874,460 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1900-S -2,459,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1901 -111,430 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1901-S -1,596,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1902 -31,140 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1902-S -1,753,625 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1903 -287,270 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1903-S -954,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1904 -6,256,699 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1904-S -5,134,175 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1905 -58,910 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1905-S – 1,813,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1906 -69,596 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1906-D -620,250 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1906-S -2,065,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1907 Liberty -1,451,786 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907-D -842,250 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1907-S -2,165,800 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs:

1877 -20 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1878 -20 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1879 -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1880 -36 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1881 -51 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1882 -59 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1883 -92 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1884 -71 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1885 -77 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1886 -106 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1887 -121 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1888 -105 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1889 -41 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1890 -55 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1891 -52 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1892 -93 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1893 -59 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1894 -50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1895 -51 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1896 -128 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1897 -86 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1898 -75 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1899 -84 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1900 -124 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1901 -96 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1902 -114 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1903 -158 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1904 -98 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1905 -92 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1906 -94 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 Liberty -78 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907-D -1 coins minted at the Denver Mint

Special Strike:

1906-D Special Strike -12 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1907-D Special Strike -1 coins minted at the Denver Mint

Collecting Liberty Head Double Eagle

Liberty Head Double Eagles are usually collected as type coins. When grading one, always look for signs of wear. For Types 1, the wear tear is usually found on the Miss Liberty’s ear on the reverse and the Eagle’s head and neck in the reverse. Even in high grades, Type 1 Liberty Head Double Eagles are often seen with bag marks.

For Type 2 Liberty Head Double Eagles, focus on Miss Liberty’s eyebrow, her cheek and the hair above her ear and the Eagle’s neck, the tip of its wings and the top of the shield on its chest as these are the areas where tears are commonly found. The same goes for the Type 3 Liberty Head Double Eagles.

The most sought-after and highest priced Liberty Head Double Eagles are the 1849 Proof, 1854-O, 1855-S 1856-O, 1856-S, 1861, 1861-S, 1867, 1869, 1870-CC, 1871-CC, 1873 Open, 3, 1875-S 1879-O, 1879-CC, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886 and 1887. Prices for the Liberty Head Double Eagles range from $1,320.00-$500,000.00 for regular strikes and from $7,500.00-$20,000,000.00 for proofs.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, Coins.com, Collectors Weekly

The Three Dollar Gold Coin

The Three Dollar Gold Coins were an unusual denomination minted from 1854 up until 1889. It was created after the regular price for 100 postage stamps sheets was reduced from $5 to $3. The designer of the coin was James Longacre, Chief Engraver at the US Mint.

The US Mint and Congress were quite confident that the public would welcome this gold coin with open arms, but things didn’t go as planned. The public rejected the Three Dollar Gold Coin, and because of the very low demand, it was reported that only less than half a million were produced from all US Mints combined.

The History of the Three Dollar Gold Coin

In the year 1853, the United States made a settlement dispute with Mexico to acquire a massive portion of Mexico – 29,670 square miles. By 1854, the agreement was signed and was called the Gadsden Purchase, also known as the Treaty of La Mesilla. The US paid Mexico $10 Million for the land that is now a portion of Arizona and New Mexico.

In the same year, 1854, Commodore Matthew Perry, a naval officer made an expedition towards Japan that forced the later country to open up its doors for trade and commerce. Earlier in 1845, the US has already joined a movement that was celebrated worldwide which aims to uniform the postage stamps and their rates. The Congressional Act of 1845 approved the first US postage stamps. Also, the rate of the local prepaid letter was maintained at five cents.

Six years later, Senator Daniel S. Dickinson of New York advocated for a legislation that initiated the creation of tiny silver coins in three cents denomination. During that time, the public uses large cents that are inconvenient and unpopular, making it necessary for new coins to be minted. Also, the new three cents will make it easier for people to buy stamps.

The same reasoning was used and the Mint Act of February 21, 1853, authorized the creation of the Three Dollar Gold Coins. The Congress and Robert Maskell Patterson, a Mathematician and the Current US Mint Director at that time were certain that the public would welcome the new coin which will be used to purchase sheets of the three cent stamps.

US Mint Chief Engraver James Barton Longacre made the design for the new Three Dollar Gold Coin. It has a reeded edge, weighs approximately 5.0150g and has 20.5mm in diameter. For the obverse, he used an Indian Princess modeled after a statue in a Philadelphia museum. Longacre used the Greco-Roman Venus Accroupie’s sharp nose on his 1849 Gold Dollar and again on the 1859 Indian Head Cent.

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1854-G$3-Indian Princess Head, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Miss Liberty can be seen wearing a feathered headdress that has equal-sized plumes and a band that bears the word LIBERTY in capital letters. The inscription of UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is written in bold letters surrounding Miss Liberty.

For the reverse side of the coin, a wreath made up of wheat, corn, tobacco, and cotton is featured. The wreath encircles the gold coins’ denomination which is 3 DOLLARS as well as the date.

There are two bold types of reverse for the Three Dollar Gold Coin – a small DOLLARS can be seen on coins minted in 1854 while a large DOLLARS are minted from 1855-1889. Mint marks for each Three Dollar Gold Coin can be found underneath the wreath.

According to NGCCOIN.Com, over 535,000 pieces of the THREE DOLLAR GOLD COINS were minted in regular strike and only 2058 in proofs. In 1854, the first Three Dollar Gold Coins minted were 15 proof coins. By May 1, 1854, the regular production of the Three Dollar Gold Coins commenced. The three US Mints that produced the gold coin are the Philadelphia, Dahlonega and New Orleans Mint.

During the first year of production, the Philadelphia minted produced 138,618 Three Dollar Gold Coins and bears no mint marks. 1,120 were produced at the Dahlonega Mint bearing the mint mark D while 24,000 were minted at the New Orleans Mint bearing the mint mark O. these two US Mints only produced coins in 1854. The San Francisco Mint continued the production of Three Dollar Gold Coins in 1855 to 1857, 1860 and 1870. The Three Dollar Gold Coins ceased in 1889 as well as the three-cent nickel and gold dollar.

Regular Strikes of the Three Dollar Gold Coins according to the PCGS Coin Facts
1854 Three Dollar Gold -138,618 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1854-D Three Dollar Gold -1,120 pieces produced at the Dahlonega Mint

1854-O Three Dollar Gold -24,000 pieces produced at the New Orleans Mint

1855 Three Dollar Gold -50,555 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1855-S Three Dollar Gold – 6,600 pieces produced at the San Francisco Mint

1856 Three Dollar Gold -26,010 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1856-S Three Dollar Gold -34,500 pieces produced at the San Francisco Mint

1857 Three Dollar Gold -20,891 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1857-S Three Dollar Gold -14,250 pieces produced at the San Francisco Mint

1858 Three Dollar Gold -2,133 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1859 Three Dollar Gold – 15,558 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1860 Three Dollar Gold -7,036 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1860-S Three Dollar Gold -7,000 pieces produced at the San Francisco Mint

1861 Three Dollar Gold -5,959 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1862 Three Dollar Gold -5,750 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1863 Three Dollar Gold -5,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1864 Three Dollar Gold – 2,630 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1865 Three Dollar Gold -1,140 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1866 Three Dollar Gold – 4,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1867 Three Dollar Gold – 2,600 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1868 Three Dollar Gold – 4,850 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1869 Three Dollar Gold – 2,500 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1870 Three Dollar Gold – 3,500 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1870-S Three Dollar Gold – 1 piece produced at the San Francisco Mint

1871 Three Dollar Gold -1,300 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1872 Three Dollar Gold-2,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1873 Three Dollar Gold-100 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1874 Three Dollar Gold-41,800 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1877 Three Dollar Gold-1,468 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1878 Three Dollar Gold-82,304 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1879 Three Dollar Gold-3,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1880 Three Dollar Gold-1,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1881 Three Dollar Gold-500 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1882 Three Dollar Gold-1.500 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1883 Three Dollar Gold-900 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1884 Three Dollar Gold-1,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1885 Three Dollar Gold-801 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1886 Three Dollar Gold-1,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1887 Three Dollar Gold-6,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1888 Three Dollar Gold – 5,000 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1889 Three Dollar Gold – 2,300 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

Proof Strikes of the Three Dollar Gold Coins according to the PCGS Coin Facts

1854 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 15 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1855 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 5 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1856 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 5 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1857 Three Dollar Gold, DC (Proof) – 5 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1858 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 15 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1859 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 80 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1860 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 119 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1861 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 113 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1862 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 35 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1863 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 39 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1864 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 50 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1865 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 25 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1865 Three Dollar Gold Restrike, DC (Proof) – Total number of coins produced unknown

1866 Three Dollar Gold, DC (Proof) – 30 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1867 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 50 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1868 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 25 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1869 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 25 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1870 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 35 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1871 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 30 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1872 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 30 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1873 Three Dollar Gold Closed 3 (Proof) – 8 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1873 Three Dollar Gold Open 3 (Proof) – 25 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1874 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 20 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1875 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 20 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1876 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 45 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1877 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 20 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1878 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 20 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1879 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 30 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1880 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 36 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1881 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 54 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1882 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) -76 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1883 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 89 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1884 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 106 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1885 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 109 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1886 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 142 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1887 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 160 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1888 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 291 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1889 Three Dollar Gold (Proof) – 129 pieces produced at the Philadelphia Mint

1855-S Three Dollar Gold, BM (Proof) – 2 pieces produced at the San Francisco Mint

It is important to note that Three Dollar Gold Coins in Proofs can have Cameo or Deep Cameo effects. Such coins have a mirror-like surface and can be a moderate to light contrast on both sides.

Prices of the 1909 VDB Lincoln Cents

One can buy Three Dollar Gold Coins starting at $550.00 up to $ 330,000.00.

For a price guide of the Three Dollar Gold Coins, you may check the list on PCGS.

Collecting Three Dollar Gold Coins

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1854-G$3-Indian Princess Head, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Three Dollar Gold Coins may have been unpopular at the time these were made available to the public, but it has gained a reputation for rarity among coin collectors nowadays. It proved to be difficult when collecting these gold coins even for collectors with unlimited resources.

Almost all Three Dollar Gold Coins are considered rare as only over half a million were minted. Rare dated Three Dollar Gold pieces include the following:

1854-D Three Dollar Gold

These are the only Three Dollar Gold Coins minted in the Dahlonega Mint

1875 Proof Three Dollar Gold

Three Dollar Gold Coins minted in 1875 have a mintage rate of 20 – all are considered Ultra Rare

1876 Proof Three Dollar Gold

There were only 45 proofs were minted considered Extremely or Ultra Rare coins

Some varieties of the Three Dollar Gold Coins that only has a few dozen of pieces are only offered once if not twice in a lifetime, making it very hard for collectors to acquire the rarest pieces. If you’re keen on collecting the complete series, the coin you’ll have to chase is the 1870-S Three Dollar Gold Coin.

1870-S Three Dollar Gold

According to the NGC, the 1870-S is worth 4 million dollars. Only one specimen is known to exist and was owned by Harry Bass. He was a popular coin collector known for having the most complete collection of die-state and die-variety US gold coins. As of to date, the 1870-S was on loan to the ANA (American Numismatic Association) located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Some say there is another specimen for the 1870-S but never made an appearance.

Another coin worth mentioning is the 1855-S in Branch Mint Proof. According to the PCGS CoinFacts, this variety which is worth more than 1.3 million dollars.

Some Three Dollar Gold Coins were minted in small numbers but nonetheless within a collector reach are the following:

1854-O Three Dollar Gold– the only Three Dollar Gold Coins minted in New Orleans have a total number of 24,000 coins produced, but only a thousand were said to exist nowadays.

1865 Three Dollar Gold – only 1,140 were produced in a regular strike and 25 proofs

1877 Three Dollar Gold – only 1,468 were produced in a regular strike and 20 proofs

1881 Three Dollar Gold – only 500 were produced in a regular strike and 54 proofs

In conclusion, one can buy a Three Dollar Gold Coin from $550.00-$4,000,000.00. Because of its rarity, many have tried to scam people by selling fake or even low-grade Three Dollar Gold Coins and sold for a much higher price than necessary. When buying this gold coin, make sure to purchase only from certified sellers and dealers.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGCCoin, U.S. Coin Values

Featured Image Source: US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1854-G$3-Indian Princess Head, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0