The Jefferson Nickel

The longest circulating five-cent coin is the Jefferson Nickel. It first appeared in 1938 after replacing the Buffalo Nickel which was first minted in 1913. Over the years, the Jefferson Nickel has seen modifications when it came to its obverse and reverse design, as well as a change in its metal composition. As of this year, it has been around for 80 years in circulation.

The History of the Jefferson Nickel

In early 1938, the United States Treasury Department wanted to create a new five-cent coin that will replace the Buffalo Nickel. The Buffalo Nickel has already been in circulation for the past 25 years, and it was time for a change in the nickel’s design. So, a competition was held to the public.

The criteria for the new five-cent specifically asked to feature what the US Treasury Department called as “an authentic portrait” of the third president, President Thomas Jefferson on the obverse. As for the reverse side of the coin, Jefferson’s historic home, Monticello will be featured. The public was made aware of the criteria and deadlines, and at the end of the competition, a total of 390 designs were submitted.

Out of all the designs, Felix Schlag’s entry reigned supreme. He was a German-American sculptor at the time of the contest. In the end, he received a prize amounting to $1,000.00. despite winning the competition, his design for the reverse was met with criticisms by the Federal Commission of Fine Arts. Since his design was rejected, it was only after a couple of debates and revision that the final design was approved.

The minting of the Jefferson Nickel was delayed, and it is only in September that the coin was released. The coins were minted in three US Mints – Philadelphia, San Francisco and Denver – all coins bearing the respective mintmark of the Mint they were coined with the exception of the Philadelphia Mint. Coins minted in San Francisco bears the mintmark S while those produced in Denver has D mintmarks. As for those minted in Philadelphia, the coins were only struck with the mintmark P starting 1980.

The Four Types of the Jefferson Nickel according to PCGS Coin Facts

Type 1 Original Design, Vintage Jefferson Nickel

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/NNC-US-1938-5C-Jefferson_Nickel.jpg

The Type 1 Jefferson Nickel weighs 5.00 grams, is 21.20 mm in diameter, has a plain edge and is composed of 75% Copper and 25% Nickel. These were minted from 1938-1964. The obverse features a portrait of President Thomas Jefferson facing left. IN GOD WE TRUST is seen on the left side of the coin while the word LIBERTY * Date minted is on the right side of the obverse.

For the reverse, a classic rendition of Jefferson’s home is featured with its name, MONTICELLO just below the building. The legend E PLURIBUS UNUM is seen on top while the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is on the bottom of the coin. the denomination FIVE CENTS is situated in between MONTICELLO and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. The mintmark is them located on the right side of Jefferson’s home.

Regular Strike

1938 – 19,496,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1938-D – 5,376,000 pieces minted in Denver

1938-S – 4,105,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1939 – 120,627,535

  •    1939 Reverse of 1938
  •    1939 Reverse of 1940
  •    1939 Doubled Monticello

1939-D – 3,514,000 pieces minted in Denver

  •    1939-D Reverse of 1938
  •    1939-D Reverse of 1940

1939-S -6,630,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

  •    1939-S Reverse of 1938
  •    1939-S Reverse of 1940

1940 – 176,485,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1940-D – 43,540,000 pieces minted in Denver

1940-S -36,690,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1941 -203,265,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1941-D – 53,432,000 pieces minted in Denver

1941-S – 43,445,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1942 – 49,789,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1942-D -13,938,000 pieces minted in Denver

  •    1942-D/D D/Horizontal D

1946 – 161,116,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1946-D – 45,292,200 pieces minted in Denver

1946-S – 13,560,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1947 – 95,000,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1947-D – 37,822,000 pieces minted in Denver

1947-S – 24,720,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1948 – 89,348,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1948-D – 44,734,000 pieces minted in Denver

1948-S – 11,300,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1949 – 60,652,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1949-D – 36,498,000 pieces minted in Denver

  •    1949-D/S

1949-S – 9,716,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1950 – 9,796,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1950-D – 2,630,030 pieces minted in Denver

1951 – 28,552,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1951-D – 20,460,000 pieces minted in Denver

1951-S – 7,776,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1952 – 63,988,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1952-D – 30,638,000 pieces minted in Denver

1952-S – 20,572,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1953 – 46,644,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1953-D – 59,878,600 pieces minted in Denver

1953-S – 19,210,900 pieces minted in San Francisco

1954 – 47,684,050 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1954-D – 117,183,060 pieces minted in Denver

1954-S – 29,384,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

  •    1954-S/D

1955 – 7,888,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1955-D – 74,464,100 pieces minted in Denver

  •    1955-D/S

1956 – 35,216,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1956-D – 67,222,940 pieces minted in Denver

1957 – 38,400,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1957-D – 136,828,900 pieces minted in Denver

1958 – 17,088,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1958-D – 168,249,120 pieces minted in Denver

1959 – 27,248,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1959-D – 160,738,240 pieces minted in Denver

1960 – 55,416,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1960-D – 192,582,180 pieces minted in Denver

1961 – 73,640,100 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1961-D – 229,342,760 pieces minted in Denver

1962 – 97,384,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1962-D – 280,195,720 pieces minted in Denver

1963 – 175,784,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1963-D – 276,829,460 pieces minted in Denver

1964 – 1,024,672,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1964-D – 1,787,297,160 pieces minted in Denver

Proofs

1938 – 19,365 ((estimated)) pieces minted in Philadelphia

1939 – 12,535 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1939 Reverse of 1940

1940 – 14,158 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1940 Reverse of 1938

1941 – 18,720 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1942 – 29,600 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1950 – 51,386 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1951 – 57,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1952 – 81,980 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1953 – 128,800 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1954 – 233,300 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1955 – 378,200 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1956 – 669,384 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1957 – 1,247,952 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1958 – 875,652 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1959 – 1,149,291 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1960 – 1,691,602 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1961 – 3,028,144 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1962 – 3,218,019 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1963 – 3,075,645 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1964 – 3,950,762 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Special Strikes

1964 SMS – 3,950,762 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Type 1 Original Design, Modern Jefferson Nickel

The second type of Type 1 Jefferson Nickel as minted from 1965-2003.

Regular Strike

1965 – 136,131,380 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1966 – 156,208,283 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1967 – 107,325,800 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1968-D – 91,227,880 pieces minted in Denver

1968-S – 103,437,510 pieces minted in San Francisco

1969-D – 202,807,500 pieces minted in Denver

1969-S – 123,009,631 pieces minted in San Francisco

1970-D – 515,485,380 pieces minted in Denver

1970-S – 214,464,814 pieces minted in San Francisco

1971 – 106,884,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1971-D – 316,144,800 pieces minted in Denver

1972 – 202,036,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1972-D – 351,694,600 pieces minted in Denver

1973 – 384,396,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1973-D – 261,405,000 pieces minted in Denver

1974 – 601,752,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1974-D – 277,373,000 pieces minted in Denver

1975 – 181,772,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1975-D – 401,875,300 pieces minted in Denver

1976 – 367,124,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1976-D – 563,964,147 pieces minted in Denver

1977 – 585,376,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1977-D -297,313,422 pieces minted in Denver

1978 – 391,308,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1978-D – 313,092,780 pieces minted in Denver

1979 -463,188,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1979-D – 325,867,672 pieces minted in Denver

1980-P – 593,004,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1980-D – 502,323,448 pieces minted in Denver

1981-P – 657,504,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1981-D – 364,801,843 pieces minted in Denver

1982-P – 292,355,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1982-D – 373,726,544 pieces minted in Denver

1983-P – 561,615,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1983-D – 536,726,276 pieces minted in Denver

1984-P – 746,769,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1984-D – 517,675,146 pieces minted in Denver

1985-P – 647,114,962 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1985-D – 459,747,446 pieces minted in Denver

1986-P – 361,819,140 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1986-D – 361,819,140 pieces minted in Denver

1987-P – 371,499,481 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1987-D – 410,590,604 pieces minted in Denver

1988-P – 771,360,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1988-D – 663,771,652 pieces minted in Denver

1989-P – 898,812,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1989-D – 570,842,474 pieces minted in Denver

1990-P – 661,636,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1990-D – 663,938,503 pieces minted in Denver

1991-P – 614,104,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1991-D – 436,496,678 pieces minted in Denver

1992-P – 399,552,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1992-D – 450,565,113 pieces minted in Denver

1993-P – 412,076,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1993-D – 406,084,135 pieces minted in Denver

1994-P – 722,160,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1994-D – 715,762,110 pieces minted in Denver

1995-P – 774,156,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1995-D – 888,112,000 pieces minted in Denver

1996-P – 829,332,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1996-D – 817,736,000 pieces minted in Denver

1997-P – 470,972,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1997-D – 466,640,000 pieces minted in Denver

1998-P – 688,272,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1998-D – 635,360,000 pieces minted in Denver

1999-P – 1,212,000,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1999-D – 1,066,720,000 pieces minted in Denver

2000-P – 846,240,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2000-D – 1,509,520,000 pieces minted in Denver

2001-P – 675,704,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2001-D – 627,680,000 pieces minted in Denver

2002-P – 539,280,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2002-D – 691,200,000 pieces minted in Denver

2003-P – 441,840,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2003-D – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Denver

Proofs

1968-S – 3,041,506 pieces minted in San Francisco

1969-S – 2,934,631 pieces minted in San Francisco

1970-S – 2,632,810 pieces minted in San Francisco

1971-S – 3,220,733 pieces minted in San Francisco

  •    1971 No S

1972-S – 3,260,996 pieces minted in San Francisco

1973-S – 2,760,339 pieces minted in San Francisco

1974-S – 2,612,568 pieces minted in San Francisco

1975-S – 2,845,450 pieces minted in San Francisco

1976-S – 4,149,730 pieces minted in San Francisco

1977-S – 3,251,152 pieces minted in San Francisco

1978-S – 3,127,781 pieces minted in San Francisco

1979 – 3,677,175 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1979-S Type 1
  •    1979-S Type 2

1980-S – 3,554,806 pieces minted in San Francisco

1981 – 4,063,083 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1981-S Type 1
  •    1981-S Type 2

1982-S – 3,857,479 pieces minted in San Francisco

1983-S – 3,279,126 pieces minted in San Francisco

1984-S – 3,065,110 pieces minted in San Francisco

1985-S – 3,362,821 pieces minted in San Francisco

1986-S – 3,010,497 pieces minted in San Francisco

1987-S – 4,227,728 pieces minted in San Francisco

1988-S – 3,262,948 pieces minted in San Francisco

1989-S – 3,220,194 pieces minted in San Francisco

1990-S – 3,299,559 pieces minted in San Francisco

1991-S – 2,867,787 pieces minted in San Francisco

1992-S – 4,176,560 pieces minted in San Francisco

1993-S – 3,394,792 pieces minted in San Francisco

1994-S – 3,269,923 pieces minted in San Francisco

1995-S – 2,797,481 pieces minted in San Francisco

1996-S – 2,525,265 pieces minted in San Francisco

1997-S – 2,796,678 pieces minted in San Francisco

1998-S – 2,086,507 pieces minted in San Francisco

1999-S – 2,543,401 pieces minted in San Francisco

2000-S – 3,082,483 pieces minted in San Francisco

2001-S – 2,294,043 pieces minted in San Francisco

2002-S – 2,277,720 pieces minted in San Francisco

2003-S – N/A minted in San Francisco

Special Strikes

1965 SMS – 2,360,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1966 SMS – 2,260,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1967 SMS – 1,860,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1994-P SMS – 167,703 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1997-P SMS – 25,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Type 2 Silver Alloy Jefferson Nickel

Photo taken by user bobby131313. Image courtesy of CCF Numismatics , 1945-P-Jefferson-War-Nickel-Obverse , size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

The second type of the Jefferson Nickel were minted from 1942-1945 only. The composition was replaced with 56% Copper, 35% Silver, 9% Manganese since Nickel can no longer be used in coining five cents.

Photo taken by user bobby131313 and may be used freely with following credit. Image courtesy of CCF Numismatics, 1945-P-Jefferson-War-Nickel-Reverse, size von Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

Another change in design was the location of a bigger mintmark just above the Monticello residence in the reverse.

Regular Strike

1942-P  – 57,873,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1942-S – 32,900,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1943-P – 271,165,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1943-P Doubled Die Obverse
  •    1943/2-P

1943-D – 15,294,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1943-S – 104,060,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1944-P – 119,150,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1944-D – 32,309,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1944-S – 21,640,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1945-P – 119,408,100 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1945-P Doubled Die Reverse

1945-D – 37,158,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1945-S – 58,939,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

Proofs

1942-P Type 2 – 27,600 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Type 3 Westward Journey Jefferson Nickel

When the 200th anniversary of Meriwether Lewis & William Clark expedition occurred during the time Thomas Jefferson was the seated President, so a Jefferson Nickel was created in honor of this expedition. The Type 3 Jefferson Nickel actually has four designs which were all minted in 2004-2005. The metal composition is now back to 75% Copper, 25% Nickel.

The 2004 Peace Medal Type 3 Westward Journey Jefferson Nickel

The original design for the obverse remained but the reverse was replaced with a featured image of two hands shaking, with a tomahawk and crossed peace pipe. The legends the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA followed by LOUISIANA PURCHASE and the date 1803 is above while the E PLURIBUS UNUM and the denomination FIVE CENTS are below the featured image.

These are the two obverse designs for the Type 3 Jefferson Nickel

 

United States Mint, Nickel Obverse , size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

These are the four reverse designs for the Type 3 Jefferson Nickel

United States Mint, NickelReverses , edited by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The 2004 Keel Boat Type 3 Westward Journey Jefferson Nickel

Minted in 2004, it features the original design of the obverse while the reverse is now featuring a boat believed to be used by Lewis and Clark during their expedition. LEWIS & CLARK and the denomination FIVE CENTS  can be seen just below the boat while the legends UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM lies above the boat.

The 2005 American Bison Type 3 Westward Journey Jefferson Nickel

Minted in 2005, the obverse now has a portrait of Jefferson off-center and facing right. IN GOD WE TRUST, liberty is written in cursive and the year 2005 can be seen on the right side of the coin together with the mintmark. As for the reverse, an American Bison was used while the legend UNITED STATES of AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM, and FIVE CENTS are inscribed,

The 2005 Western Waters Type 3 Westward Journey Jefferson Nickel

The last type of the Westward Journey Jefferson Nickel was minted in 2005 and retained the obverse of the 2005 American Bison Type 3 Westward Journey Jefferson Nickel. The reverse now features a view of the Pacific Ocean where the words Ocean in view! Oh the Joy! Surrounding the featured image are the legends UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM and LEWIS & CLARK 1805.

Regular Strike

2004-P Peace Medal – 361,440,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia

2004-D Peace Medal – 372,000,000 pieces were minted in Denver

2004-P Keel Boat – 366,720,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia

2004-D Keel Boat – 344,880,000 pieces were minted in Denver

2005-P Bison – 448,320,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia

2005-D Speared Bison – 487,680,000 pieces were minted in Denver

2005-D Bison – unknown pieces were minted in Philadelphia

2005-P Western Waters – 394,080,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia

2005-D Western Waters – 411,000,000 pieces were minted in Denver

Proofs

2004-S Peace Medal – 2,965,422 pieces were minted in San Francisco

2004-S Keel Boat – 2,965,422 pieces were minted in San Francisco

2005-S Bison – 3,344,679 pieces were minted in San Francisco

2005-S Western Waters – 3,344,679 pieces were minted in San Francisco

Special Strikes

2005-P Bison – Satin Finish – unknown pieces were minted in Philadelphia

2005-D Bison – Satin Finish – unknown pieces were minted in Denver

2005-P Western Waters – Satin Finish – unknown pieces were minted in Philadelphia

2005-D Western Waters – Satin Finish – unknown pieces were minted in Denver

Type 4, Return to Monticello Jefferson Nickel

The last and still in circulation design for the Jefferson Nickel went back to the original reverse design where Monticello is featured. Jefferson is now almost facing forward and is indented to the left. IN GOD WE TRUST, liberty in cursive writing and the date and year is inscribed on the right side of the coin. Minting of the Type 4 Jefferson Nickel started in 2006 up until the present.

Regular Strike

2006-P 5C Return to Monticello – 690,000,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2006-D 5C Return to Monticello – 810,000,000 pieces minted in Denver

2007-P 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2007-D 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Denver

2008-P 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2008-D 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Denver

2009-P 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2009-D 5C – 46,800,000 pieces minted in Denver

2010-P 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2010-D 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Denver

2011-P 5C – 450,000,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2011-D 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Denver

2012-P 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2012-D 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Denver

2013-P 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2013-D 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Denver

2014-P 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

2014-D 5C – 383,040,000 pieces minted in Denver

Proofs

2006-S 5C Return to Monticello – 3,054,436 pieces minted in San Francisco

2007-S 5C – 2,577,166 pieces minted in San Francisco

2008-S 5C – 2,169,561 pieces minted in San Francisco

2009-S 5C – 2,179,867 pieces minted in San Francisco

2010-S 5C – 1,689,364 pieces minted in San Francisco

2011-S 5C – 1,453,276 pieces minted in San Francisco

2012-S 5C – 1,237,926 pieces minted in San Francisco

2013-S 5C – unknown pieces minted in San Francisco

2014-S 5C – unknown pieces minted in San Francisco

2015-S 5C – unknown pieces minted in San Francisco

2017-S 5C – unknown pieces minted in San Francisco

Special Strikes

2006-P 5C Return to Monticello-Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Philadelphia

2006-D 5C Return to Monticello-Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Denver

2007-P 5C Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Philadelphia

2007-D 5C Satin Finish –  unknown pieces minted in Denver

2008-P 5C Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Philadelphia

2008-D 5C Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Denver

2009-P 5C Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Philadelphia

2009-D 5C Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Denver

2010-D 5C Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Denver

2010-P 5C Satin Finish – unknown pieces minted in Philadelphia

Collection Jefferson Nickel Coins

The Jefferson Nickel was lots of varieties – overdates doubled dies and over mintmarks. Due to high mintages,no dates are considered as scarce. Because of this, the Jefferson Nickel is an easily attainable and an affordable collection. As for collectors, the following are targeted and desired: the 1938-D, 1938-S, 1939, 1939-D, 1939-S 1950-D and 1961.

One can purchase PCGS-graded Jefferson Nickel coins from $1.00-27,500.00. Since most Jefferson Nickels are cheap, it makes a fun and easy collection that will continuously grow in number up until the time the design is retained. If you want to start a coin collection wherein you don’t need a lot of money to pull out from your and with less stress and difficulty, then the Jefferson Nickel is one you can start with.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, Coin Community

The Barber Dime

The Barber Dime is part of the Barber Coinage consisting of two other coins – the quarter and half-dollar. The three denominations of the Barber Coinage were born in 1892 and were named after the designer itself – Charles E. Barber.  

The Barber Dime came to be part of the US coinage but not before many controversies. For one, a competition was held to change the design of the dime, quarter and half dollar even if the US Mint Engraver at that time, which was Barber himself, was not in favor of. He claims that there were only a very few people who know how to create the perfect designs for the US coinage, including himself. In the end, Barber still reigned as the winner when he was appointed by US Mint Director Edward O. Leech.

Brandon Grossardt for the coin image. Charles Barber for the coin design., 1914 Barber Dime NGC MS64plus Obverse, size von Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

Barber did know what needs to be done to create the exact specifications needed to properly strike the coins’ design. For the obverse, he used a portrait of Miss Liberty facing right. She is wearing a wreath made from laurel leaves and a Phrygian cap on her head. The legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is on top of Miss Liberty while the date is below it.

Brandon Grossardt for the coin image. Charles Barber for the coin design., 1914 Barber Dime NGC MS64plus Reverse, size von Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

As for the reverse, the denomination ONE DIME is found on the center of the coin while being surrounded or enclosed by a large wreath. It weighs approximately 2.50 grams, has a diameter of 17.90 mm and has a reeded edge. It is composed of 90% Silver and 10% Copper. The Barber Dimes were minted within a span of 24 years – from 1892-1916 in US Mints located in Philadelphia, New Orleans, San Francisco and Denver.

The Varieties, Mintage and Mint Marks of the Barber Dime

The Regular Strikes of the Barber Dime

1892 Barber Dime – 12,120,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1892-O Barber Dime – 3,841,700 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1892-S Barber Dime – 990,710 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1893 Barber Dime – 3,340,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

  •    1893/2

1893-O Barber Dime – 1,760,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1893-S Barber Dime – 2,491,401 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1894 Barber Dime – 1,330,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1894-O Barber Dime – 720,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1895 Barber Dime – 690,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1895-O Barber Dime – 440,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1895-S Barber Dime – 1,120,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1896 Barber Dime – 2,000,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1896-O Barber Dime – 610,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1896-S Barber Dime – 575,056 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1897 Barber Dime – 10,868,533 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1897-O Barber Dime – 666,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1897-S Barber Dime – 1,342,844 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1898 Barber Dime – 16,320,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1898-O Barber Dime – 2,130,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1898-S Barber Dime – 1,702,507 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1899 Barber Dime – 19,580,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1899-O Barber Dime – 2,650,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1899-S Barber Dime – 1,867,493 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1900 Barber Dime – 17,600,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1900-O Barber Dime – 2,010,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1900-S Barber Dime – 5,168,270 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1901 Barber Dime -18,859,665 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1901-O Barber Dime – 5,620,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1901-S Barber Dime – 593,022 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1902 Barber Dime – 21,380,777 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1902-O Barber Dime – 4,500,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1902-S Barber Dime – 2,070,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1903 Barber Dime – 19,500,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1903-O Barber Dime – 8,180,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1903-S Barber Dime – 613,300 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1904 Barber Dime – 14,600,357 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1904-S Barber Dime – 800,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1905 Barber Dime – 14,551,623 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1905-O Barber Dime – 3,400,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

  •    1905-O Micro O Barber Dime

1905-S Barber Dime – 6,855,199 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1906 Barber Dime – 19,957,731 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1906-D Barber Dime – 4,060,000 pieces were minted in Denver Mint

1906-O Barber Dime – 2,610,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1906-S Barber Dime – 3,136,640 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1907 Barber Dime – 22,220,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1907-D Barber Dime – 4,080,000 pieces were minted in Denver Mint

1907-O Barber Dime – 5,058,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1907-S Barber Dime – 3,178,470 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1908 Barber Dime – 10,600,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1908-D Barber Dime – 7,490,000 pieces were minted in Denver Mint

1908-O Barber Dime – 1,789,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1908-S Barber Dime – 3,220,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1909 Barber Dime – 10,240,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1909-D Barber Dime – 954,000 pieces were minted in Denver Mint

1909-O Barber Dime – 2,287,000 pieces were minted in New Orleans Mint

1909-S Barber Dime – 1,000,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1910 Barber Dime – 11,520,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1910-D Barber Dime – 3,490,000 pieces were minted in Denver Mint

1910-S Barber Dime – 1,240,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1911 Barber Dime – 18,870,543 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1911-D Barber Dime – 11,209,000 pieces were minted in Denver Mint

1911-S Barber Dime – 3,520,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1912 Barber Dime – 19,349,300 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1912-D Barber Dime – 11,760,000 pieces were minted in Denver Mint

1912-S Barber Dime – 3,420,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1913 Barber Dime – 19,760,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1913-S Barber Dime – 510,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1914 Barber Dime – 17,360,230 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1914-D Barber Dime – 11,908,000 pieces were minted in Denver Mint

1914-S Barber Dime – 2,100,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1915 Barber Dime – 5,620,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1915-S Barber Dime – 960,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

1916 Barber Dime – 18,490,000 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1916-S Barber Dime – 5,820,000 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

Proofs

1892 Barber Dime (Proof) – 1,245 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1893 Barber Dime (Proof) – 792 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1894 Barber Dime (Proof) – 972 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1895 Barber Dime (Proof) – 880 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1896 Barber Dime (Proof) – 762 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1897 Barber Dime (Proof) – 731 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1898 Barber Dime (Proof) – 735 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1899 Barber Dime (Proof) – 846    pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1900 Barber Dime (Proof) – 912 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1901 Barber Dime (Proof) – 813 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1902 Barber Dime (Proof) – 777 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1903 Barber Dime (Proof) – 755 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1904 Barber Dime (Proof) – 670 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1905 Barber Dime (Proof) – 727 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1906 Barber Dime (Proof) – 675 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1907 Barber Dime (Proof) – 575 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1908 Barber Dime (Proof) – 545 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1909 Barber Dime (Proof) – 650 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1910 Barber Dime (Proof) – 551 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1911 Barber Dime (Proof) – 543 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1912 Barber Dime (Proof) – 700 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1913 Barber Dime (Proof) – 622 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1914 Barber Dime (Proof) – 425 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1915 Barber Dime (Proof) – 450 pieces were minted in Philadelphia Mint

1894-S Barber Dime (Proof) – 24 pieces were minted in San Francisco Mint

Collecting Barber Dimes

When it comes to Barber Dimes, the rarest of them all which was also the considered the rarest coin in the history of the US Coinage is the 1894-S Barber Dime. There were only about 24 pieces of the 1894-S dime ever recorded to be minted, and only 10 were accounted for to this day. It is still a huge mystery as to where the remaining 14 1894-S Barber Dimes are currently located, which were all proof coins that were said to have been struck in only one die.

There were many interesting stories revolving around the 1894-S Barber Dime. However, one that definitely stood out was the famously known as the Ice Cream Specimen. J. Daggett, the US San Francisco Mint Superintendent at that time was the one who supervised the minting of the 1894-Barber Dime. It is said that he gave 3 of these special issued Barber Dime to Hallie, his daughter with the strict instruction to keep them with her until she gets old as these will be of high value after a few years. Hallie kept two of these coins but used one to buy a single dish of ice cream on her way home.

In 2016, an 1894-S Barber Dime was sold for 2 Million Dollars by John Feigenbaum. Another variety worth collecting is1895-O and 1893/2 overdate. One can purchase Barber Dimes that were PCGS-graded from $4.00-$68,500.00 for regular strike coins and $185.00-$26,000.00 for Proofs, and with the rarest of them all, the 1894-S worth up to $2,000.000.00. One can easily collect Barber Dimes by type set collectors except for the rarest 1894-S and 1895-O.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC, CoinFactsThe Spruce

The Shield Nickel

The Shield Nickel first appeared in the year 1866 – the same year when the Seated Liberty Half Dime was still in circulation. It was truly an unusual event wherein two coins of the same denomination were issued. However, the Shield Nickel was made up of 75% Copper and 25% Nickel while the Seated Liberty Half Dime was composed of 90% Silver and 10% Copper.

The Shield Nickel was created because the United States needed a small change in circulation. This is after coin hoarding became an issue – wherein the shortage of coins was caused after citizens started collecting coins even before the American Civil War. The reason? Since coins in circulated during that time were made up of precious metals, the public took an interest in them.

James Pollock, the US Mint Director at that time used to oppose the idea of minting nickel coins because of the issues the Mint has to face when striking and creating the coins. Also, he was aware that Joseph Wharton, owner and chief stockholder of the largest US nickel mine had many friends and supporter in the Congress. He has been using his connections to pursue metal in the minting of US coins.

However, all changed when he finally accepted the need to create a new five-cent coin made out of nickel. Pollock then assigned the James Longacre to create the design of the new five-cent coin since he was already the US Mint Chief Engraver at that time.

Longacre was unable to use a portrait in the new nickel coin due to some issues, so he opted to use a motif he created and used earlier on a two-cent coin after modifying its design. The Obverse features a shield that has a wreath on both sides and the Order of Calatrava’s cross above it. This is the reason why the new five-cent coin was called the Shield Five Cents. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST is placed above the cross and the date just below the shield.

As for the reverse, a large number 5 is seen on the center is being surrounded by 13 stars, each star having a ray of the sun in between. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA placed in a form of an arc on top and CENTS below. The coin is made up of 75% Copper and 25% Nickel. It has a plain edge, is 20.50 millimeters and weighs about 1.94 grams.

As expected, the new five-cent coin was rarely well-struck and many dies broke during the process. The Shield Nickel with the rays on the reverse was minted from 1866-1867 and came to be the Type 1 Shield Nickel.

After the Type Shield Nickel was terminated, a new Shield Nickel was born minus the rays on the reverse to solve the problem. The Type 2 Shield Nickel was first minted early in 1867. Both types were minted only at the US Mint located in Philadelphia. The Type 2 Shield Nickel only lasted up until 1883, then the design was replaced and the 1883 Liberty Nickel was born.

The Two Types of the Shield Nickel (Varieties and Mintages)

Type 1 Shield Nickel With Rays

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1866-5C-Shield Nickel (rays), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Minted from 1866-1867 only, it was the original design made by James Barton Longacre. The Obverse features a shield that has the Order of Calatrava’s cross above the shield and wreaths on each side. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST is placed above the cross and the date just below the shield.

The reverse has a much simpler design. A big number 5 is in the middle of the coin. A series of 13 stars with 13 rays in between encircles the number 5 while UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and CENTS place above and below the reverse respectively. All were struck in Philadelphia Mint.

Regular Strike

1866 Shield Nickel With Rays – 14,742,500 pieces were struck in Philadelphia

1867 Shield Nickel With Rays – 2,019,000 pieces were struck in Philadelphia

Proofs

1866 Shield Nickel With Rays – 600 pieces were struck in Philadelphia

1867 Shield Nickel With Rays- 60 pieces were struck in Philadelphia

Type 2 Shield Nickel With No Rays

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1873-5C-Shield Nickel (stars), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The second type of the Shield Nickel was first minted in 1867 and until 1883. The new design no longer has the rays in between the stars found at the back of the coin. This is to help prevent the coin dies from breaking prematurely, since striking the rays only added pressure on the dies.

The obverse is still the same, while the only elements that were not included in the Type 2 Shield Nickel were the rays in the reverse.

Regular Strike

1867 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 28,890,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1868 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 28,817,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1869 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 16,395,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1870 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 4,806,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1871 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 561,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1872 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 6,036,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1873 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 4,550,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1873 Open 3
  •    1873 Closed 3

1874 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 3,538,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1875 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 2,097,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1876 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 2,530,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1879 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 25,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1880 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 16,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1881 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 68,800 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1882 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 11,472,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1883 Shield Nickel With No Rays – 1,451,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1883/2

Proofs

1867 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof- 600 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1867 Pattern Reverse

1868 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 600 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1869 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 600 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1870 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 1,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1871 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 960 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1872 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 950 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1873 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof- 1,100 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1873 Closed 3 Proof

1874 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 700 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1875 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 700 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1876 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 1,150 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1877 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 510 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1878 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 2,350 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1879 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 3,200 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1879/8 Proof

1880 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 3,955 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1881 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 3,575 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1882 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 3,100 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1883 Shield Nickel With No Rays Proof – 5,419 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Collecting Shield Nickel Coins

It may come as a surprise among coin collectors that even if the minting of the Shield Nickel coin was only for a short period of time, still, there are notable rarities. Those dated in 1866 and 1873 have interesting varieties. There were two overdates – 1879/8 and 1883/2. The key dates are those dated in 1877 and 1878 since only proof coins were minted. As for 1867 With Rays Proof Shield Nickel, is the most sought-after among collectors since very little was known to be struck.

When collecting Shield Nickels, the areas to check for signs of wear would be on the leaves and cross on the obverse and the number 5 at the back of the coin. These are often collected by type and date coin collectors. For type collectors, one would need to obtain each of the Shield Nickel with and without no rays. As for collecting it by date, it proves to be a much more a challenging task.

One can buy PCGS-graded Shield Nickels starting at $13.00 up to $53,000.00 for regular strikes and $1,100-$75,000.00.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, Coin Study, My Coin Guides

 

The Gold Dollar

The smallest denomination made out of Gold in the United States history of coinage belongs to no other than the Gold Dollar. It was a regular issued $1 Gold Coin minted from 1849-1899 despite the fact that minting was prohibited from 1861 until 1865 – the time of the Civil War. Thanks to the iconic California Gold Rush, the US Government was able to create coins made of Gold.

Robert M. Patterson, the US Mint Director at that time was not very keen on the idea of creating mint-issued gold dollars. However, his opposition failed to stop Gold Coins from being approved when the Congress passed a legislation on March 3, 1849. The Coin Act of 1849 authorized the created and minting of Gold $1 Coins and $20 Gold Coins which are also known as Double Eagles.

The Gold Dollar has three types: The Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar, The Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head and The Type 3 Indian Princes Large Head. All three types were designed by James B. Longacre, the US Mint Chief Engraver.

Gold Dollar is composed of 90% Gold and 10% Copper. It weighs about 1.70 grams and has a reeded edge. As for the diameter, the Type 1 is 12.70mm while both Type 2 and 3 are 14.30mm.

The Three Types of Gold Dollar (Varieties, Mintmarks, and Mintages)

Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar

The first design for the Gold $1 Coin was known as the Liberty Head. It was first struck in 1849 and lasted until 1854.

Image courtesy of , 1849 G$1 Open Wreath (obv), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY 4.0

The head of Miss Liberty facing left was featured on the obverse. She’s seen wearing a headband where the word LIBERTY was inscribed and she’s being surrounded by a total of 13 stars.

Image courtesy of , 1849 G$1 Closed Wreath (rev), size, CC BY 4.0

For the reverse, the denomination written 1 DOLLAR along with the date is surrounded by a wreath. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is placed in a form of an arc just above the wreath while the mintmark sits just below the wreath.

The Liberty Head Gold Dollar was minted in five US Mints – Philadelphia, Dahlonega, New Orleans, Charlotte and San Francisco. Each coin bears the mintmark of the respective mints where they were produced except for Philadelphia. S for those minted in San Francisco, D for Dahlonega, O for New Orleans and C for Charlotte.

The US Mints in Dahlonega and Philadelphia are the only ones that issued the Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar yearly from 1849-1854. Despite this, it was the Philadelphia Mint and the in New Orleans that have a much higher mintage among the five. The lowest number of Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollars minted in a US Mint is in the Dahlonega Mint. Proof coins were made in 1849 and 1850, but there was a rumored Liberty Head Proof minted in the year 1851 and 1854.

Regular Strike

1849 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 688,567 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  •    1849 No L
  •    1849 Open Wreath
  •    1849 Closed Wreath

1849-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 11,634 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

  •    1849-C Closed Wreath
  •    1849-C Open Wreath

1849-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 21,588 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1849-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 21,588pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1850 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 481,953 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1850-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 6,966 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

1850-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 8,382 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1850-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 14,000 pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1851 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 3,317,671 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1851-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 41,267 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

1851-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 9,882 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1851-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 290,000 pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1852 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 2,045,351 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1852-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 9,434 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

1852-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 6,360 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1852-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 140,000 pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1853 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 4,076,051 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1853-C Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 11,515 pieces were minted at the Charlotte Mint

1853-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 6,583 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1853-O Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 290,000 pieces were minted at the New Orleans Mint

1854 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 855,502 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1854-D Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 2,935 pieces were minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1854-S Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar – 14,632 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs

1849 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar (Proof) – 10 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1850 Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar (Proof) – 2 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollar

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1854-G$1-Indian head (Ty2), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The second type of the Gold Dollar was born in 1854. When the US Mint Director Robert Patterson was succeeded by James Ross Snowden, he agreed with critics that the very small size of the Gold Dollar which was only about 13 mm made it very easy to lose. Many have argued years before that a new design be made for the Gold Dollar – it should be bigger in diameter and have a center hole to compensate for the weight.

Test strikes were actually made but when Snowden became the US Mint Director, he had something else in mind. He approved of a bigger Gold Dollar in terms of diameter, but instead of putting a hole in the center of the coin, the coins will be made thinner to compensate for the weight.

Snowden then appointed Longacre to modify his Liberty Head Gold Dollar in 2854. Longacre actually based the designed f the new Gold Dollar which came to be known as the Indian Princess, Small Head on the design he made for the $3 Gold. The new Gold Dollar was then first minted in 1854 – larger in diameter for about 15%.

Lost Dutchman Rare Coins for image, James B. Longacre for coin, 1854 gold dollar type 2 obverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

For the obverse, Longacre featured a portrait of a woman wearing a fancy Indian headdress. She was facing right and her head has a smaller size compared to the Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar. Stars no longer surround the portrait and were replaced with the inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Lost Dutchman Rare Coins for image, James B. Longacre for coin, 1854 gold dollar type 2 reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

As for the reverse, the wreath got bigger as if filled the space where the inscription used to be.

The Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars were minted in five US Mints – each bearing the respective mintmark of where they were produced. The total number of coins minted were barely 1.6 million pieces – wherein Philadelphia Mint has the highest mintages.

The Type 2 Gold Dollar only lasted until 1856 due to a problem encountered when striking the coin. The high relief of the coin’s obverse was too high which resulted to some details on the head of the coin – especially the date, the word DOLLAR and sharp details on the female’s head are not very visible.

Regular Strike

1854 Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 783,943 pieces minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1855 Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 758,269 pieces minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1855-C Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 9,803 pieces minted at the Charlotte Mint

1855-D Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 1,811 pieces minted at the Dahlonega Mint

1855-O Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 55,000 pieces minted at the New Orleans Mint

1856-S Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars – 24,600 pieces minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs

1854 Type 2 Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars (Proof) – 5 pieces minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1855 Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars (Proof) – 12 pieces minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollars

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1856-G$1-Indian head (Ty3), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The 3rd type of the Gold Dollar was created in 1856 after the Type 2 proved to be deteriorating rapidly causing lots of coins to be dateless. And so, Longacre went to increase the portrait’s size, although the design was essentially the same.

The obverse still featured the so-called Indian Princess and the inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounding the portrait, but Longacre made the portrait bigger than the Type 2, the Indian Princess’ hair arranged differently, the headdress in a horizontal plane while the inscription was kept closer to the coin’s border. The reverse stayed the same.

These were minted in Philadelphia, Dahlonega, Charlotte and San Francisco. The third type proved to be the best design for the Gold Dollar thanks to its durability. After more than three decades, the Gold Dollar had its final wave in 1889.

Regular Strike

1856 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,762,936 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1856 Slanted 5
  •    1856 Upright 5

1856-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,460 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1857 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 774,789 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1857-C Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 13,280 pieces minted in Charlotte

1857-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,533 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1857-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 10,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1858 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 117,995 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1858-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,477 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1858-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 10,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1859 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 168,244 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1859-C Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,235 pieces minted in Charlotte

1859-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 4,952 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1859-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 15,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1860 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 36,514 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1860-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,566 pieces minted in Dahlonega

1860-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 13,000 pieces minted in San Francisco

1861 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 527,150 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1861-D Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – Unknown, minted in Dahlonega

1862 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,361,355 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1863 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 6,200 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1864 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1865 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,700 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1866 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 7,100 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1867 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,200 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1868 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 10,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1869 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1870 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 6,300 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1870-S Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1871 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1872 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1873 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 125,100 pieces minted in Philadelphia

  •    1873 Open 3
  •    1873 Closed 3

1874 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 198,800 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1875 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 400 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1876 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,200 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1877 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,900 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1878 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1879 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 3,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1880 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,600 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1881 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 7,620 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1882 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1883 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 10,800 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1884 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,230 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1885 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 11,156 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1886 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 5,000 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1887 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 7,500 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1888 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 15,501 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1889 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 28,950 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Proofs

1856 Slanted 5 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 15 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1857 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1858 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 40 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1859 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 80 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1860 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 154 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1861 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 349 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1862 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 35 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1863 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 50 minted in Philadelphia

1864 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 50 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1865 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 25 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1866 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 30 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1867 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 50 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1868 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 25 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1869 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 25 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1870 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 35 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1871 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 30 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1872 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 30 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1873 Closed 3 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 25 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1874 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1875 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1876 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 45 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1877 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1878 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 20 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1879 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 30 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1880 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 36 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1881 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 87 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1882 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 125pieces minted in Philadelphia

1883 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 207 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1884 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,006 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1885 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,105 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1886 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,016 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1887 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,043 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1888 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,079 pieces minted in Philadelphia

1889 Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar – 1,779 pieces minted in Philadelphia

Collecting Gold Dollars

US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1849-G$1-Liberty head (Ty1), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

For Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollars, one can easily find a complete date set, but one will find that collecting date and mintmark sets are harder to find thanks to the rarities and varieties one needs to obtain. The rare varieties are the Type 1 Liberty Gold Dollars minted at the Charlotte and Dahlonega Mints, each bearing C and D mintmarks respectively. The most in-demand coin by collectors being the 1849-C Open Wreath Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollar.

For Type 2 Indian Princess, Small Head Gold Dollars, these very much in demand among coin collectors especially those in GEM conditions. The rarest among them being the 1855-D.

As for Type 3, the most wanted is the 1856-D and 1861-D being the rarest of them all to find in MS conditions.

When grading Gold Coins, the places to look for signs of wear are the hair near the coronet and the tips of the wreath’s leaves for Type 1 Liberty Head Gold Dollars. For Type 2 Indian Princess Small Head are the areas of the Indian Princess’ hair over her eye and the ribbon’s knot at the base of the wreath. As for Type 3 Indian Princess, Large Head Gold Dollar, check for the Indian Princess’ cheeks as well as her eye and the ribbon’s knot at the base of the wreath.

One can purchase PCGS-graded Type 1 Gold Dollars starting $230.00-$135,000.00 for Mint State coins and $130,000.00-$400,000.00 for Proofs.

For Type 2 Gold Dollars, $300.00-$195,000.00 for Mint State coins and $125,000.00-$400,000.00 for Proofs.

For Type 3 Gold Dollars, $255.00-$150,000.00 for Mint State coins and $2,750.00-$75,000.00 for Proofs.

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coin Facts, NGC Coin, My Coin Guides, Coin Community

The Presidential Dollar

On December 22, 2005, an Act was signed by then-President George W. Bush to honor the special individuals who were seated as Presidents of the United States of America. The Act was called the Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-145) where portraits of the eligible presidents will be featured on a Gold-colored Dollar Coin.

Four brand new dollar coins will be minted every year where the name of the featured president, the number or order of Presidency, years of terms as a US President and the motto IN GOD WE TRUST will be indicated on the obverse. The designer of the obverse varies.

As for the reverse, Don Everhart was the designer who was also a US Mint Sculptor and Engraver. A large Statue of Liberty is featured to create a dramatic impression. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the denomination $1 are also included in the design of the reverse.

The Presidential dollars were made to have edge-incused inscriptions so as to make more room on each side of the coin. It allows the coin to have a more dramatic as well as a much larger sized artwork. The inscriptions that can be found on the edges are E PLURIBUS UNUM, the respective mintmark and the year when the coin was issued or minted. During the first two years of issuance (2007-2008), the Presidential Dollars also had the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on the edge. It was only in 2008 that the said motto was transferred on the obverse.

The Presidential Dollars were composed of 88.5% Copper, 6% Zinc, 3.5% Manganese and 2% Nickel – the same composition for Native American $1 coins and the Sacagawea Dollar. These have lettered edges, weighs approximately 8.10 grams and are 26.50 millimeters in diameter. The US Mints in Philadelphia and Denver produces the currency strikes while the San Francisco Mint produces Proof coins meant for coin collectors.  

The Presidential $1 Coin Program started in 2007 with Presidents George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and the last issue were of Presidents Richard M. Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Ronald Reagan. Under the provision of the Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005, a President may only be featured on the Presidential Coin if they have already been deceased for at least two years.

The Presidential $1 Coins Release Dates and Featured Presidents

2007

  • George Washington
  • John Adams
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • James Madison

2008

  • James Monroe
  • John Quincy Adams
  • Andrew Jackson
  • Martin Van Buren

2009

  • William Henry Harrison
  • John Tyler
  • James K. Polk
  • Zachary Taylor

2010

  • Millard Fillmore
  • Franklin Pierce
  • James Buchanan
  • Abraham Lincoln

2011

  • Andrew Johnson
  • Ulysses S. Grant
  • Rutherford B. Hayes
  • James Garfield

2012

  • Chester A. Arthur
  • Grover Cleveland (1st term)
  • Benjamin Harrison
  • Grover Cleveland (2nd term)

2013

  • William McKinley
  • Theodore Roosevelt
  • William Howard Taft
  • Woodrow Wilson

2014

  • Warren G. Harding
  • Calvin Coolidge
  • Herbert Hoover
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt

2015

  • Harry S. Truman
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • John F. Kennedy
  • Lyndon B. Johnson

2016

  • Richard M. Nixon
  • Gerald Ford
  • Ronald Reagan

The Presidential $1 Coin Releases, Mintages, Mintmark, Year and Varieties

George Washington Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar George Washington, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the very first Presidential Dollar ever minted and first issued in 2007. The coin features a portrait of President George Washington, his name on top of his portrait, 1st PRESIDENT and 1789-1797 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna while Don Everhart designed the reverse. The George Washington Presidential Dollar has the highest mintage of over 300 million pieces.

However, since the last time the US Mint has minted coins with edge-incused inscriptions, some were mistakenly issued without the lettering on the edges. Coin collectors learned of this and eagerly flocked banks to get ahold of the rare error coin.

Regular Strike

2007-P George Washington –

2007-P George Washington – Position A

2007-P George Washington – Position B

2007-D George Washington

2007-D George Washington – Position A

2007-D George Washington – Position B

(2007) George Washington, Missing Edge Lettering

Proofs

2007-S George Washington – minted in San Francisco

Special Strikes

2007-P George Washington – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-P George Washington – Position B, Satin Finish

2007-D George Washington – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-D George Washington – Position B, Satin Finish

(2007) George Washington – Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

John Adams Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar John Adams, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 2nd Presidential Dollar minted and the 2nd one issued in 2007. The coin features a portrait of President John Adams, his name on top of his portrait, 2nd PRESIDENT and 1797-1801 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Charles L. Vickers and designed by Joel Iskowitz while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 200 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2007-P John Adams – Position A

2007-P John Adams – Position B

2007-P John Adams – Doubled Edge Lettering, Overlapped

2007-P First Day of Issue

2007-D Dbld Edge Let.-Overlap

2007-P John Adams – Doubled Edge Lettering, Inverted

2007-P John Adams-Doubled Edge Let.-Inverted, First Day of Issue

(2007) John Adams – Missing Edge Lettering

(2007) First Day of Issue

2007-D John Adams – Position A

2007-D John Adams – Position B

Proofs

2007-S John Adams

Special Strikes

2007-P John Adams – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-P John Adams – Position B, Satin Finish

2007-D John Adams – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-D John Adams – Position B, Satin Finish

Thomas Jefferson Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Thomas Jefferson, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 3rd Presidential Dollar minted and the third one issued in 2007. The coin features a portrait of President Thomas Jefferson, his name on top of his portrait, 3rd PRESIDENT and 1801-1809 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 200 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2007-P Thomas Jefferson – Position A

2007-P Thomas Jefferson – Position B

2007-D Thomas Jefferson – Position A

2007-D Thomas Jefferson – Position B

(2007) Thomas Jefferson-Missing Edge Lettering

2007-D Thomas Jefferson-Doubled Edge Lettering, Inverted

2007-P Thomas Jefferson-Doubled Edge Lettering. Overlapped

Proofs

2007-S Thomas Jefferson

Special Strikes

2007-P Thomas Jefferson – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-P Thomas Jefferson – Position B, Satin Finish

2007-D Thomas Jefferson – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-D Thomas Jefferson – Position B, Satin Finish

(2007) Thomas Jefferson-Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

James Madison Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar James Madison , Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 4th Presidential Dollar minted the last one issued in 2007. The coin features a portrait of President James Madison, his name on top of his portrait, 4th PRESIDENT and 1809-1817 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Don Everhart and designed by Joel Iskowitz while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 170 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2007-P James Madison – Position A

2007-P James Madison – Position B

2007-D James Madison – Position A

(2007) James Madison – Missing Edge Lettering

2007-D James Madison – Position B

2007-D James Madison, Doubled Edge Lettering-Inverted

2007-D Dbld Edge Let. – Overlap

Proofs

2007-S James Madison

Special Strikes

2007-P James Madison – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-P James Madison – Position B, Satin Finish

(2007) James Madison – Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2007-D James Madison – Position A, Satin Finish

2007-D James Madison – Position B, Satin Finish

James Monroe Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar James Monroe , Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 5th Presidential Dollar and the first one minted in 2008. The coin features a portrait of President James Monroe, his name on top of his portrait, 5th PRESIDENT and 1817-1825 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 124 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2008-P James Monroe – Position A

2008-D James Monroe – Position A

2008-P James Monroe – Position B

2008-D James Monroe – Position B

(2008) Missing Edge Lettering James Monroe

2008-P James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Overlapped

2008-D James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Overlapped

2008-P James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Inverted

2008-D James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Inverted

2008-P James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Overlapped-1st Day of Issue

2008-D James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Overlapped-1st Day of Issue

2008-P James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Inverted-1st Day of Issue

2008-D James Monroe-Doubled Edge Letter, Inverted-1st Day of Issue

Proofs

2008-S James Monroe

Special Strikes

(2008) James Monroe, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2008-P James Monroe -Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P James Monroe Satin

2008-D James Monroe – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P James Monroe – Position B, Satin Finish

2008-D James Monroe – Position B, Satin Finish

John Quincy Adams Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar John Quincy Adams, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 6th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one minted in 2008. The coin features a portrait of President John Quincy Adams, his name on top of his portrait and 6th PRESIDENT and 1825-1829 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 115 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2008-P John Quincy Adams – Position A

2008-D John Quincy Adams – Position B

2008-P John Quincy Adams – Position B

2008-D John Quincy Adams – Position B

Proofs

2008-S John Quincy Adams

Special Strikes

2008-P John Quincy Adams – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-D John Quincy Adams – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P John Quincy Adams – Position B, Satin Finish

2008-D John Quincy Adams – Position B, Satin Finish

(2008) John Quincy Adams – Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

Andrew Jackson Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Andrew Jackson, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 7th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2008. The coin features a portrait of President Andrew Jackson, his name on top of his portrait, 7th PRESIDENT and 1829-1837 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Jim Licaretz and designed by Joel Iskowitz while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 122 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2008-P Andrew Jackson – Position A

2008-D Andrew Jackson – Position A

2008-P Andrew Jackson – Position B

2008-D Andrew Jackson – Position B

(2008) Andrew Jackson, Missing Edge Lettering

Proofs

2008-S Andrew Jackson

Special Strikes

(2008) Andrew Jackson, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2008-P Andrew Jackson – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-D Andrew Jackson – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P Andrew Jackson – Position B, Satin Finish

2008-D Andrew Jackson – Position B, Satin Finish

Martin Van Buren Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Martin Van Buren, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 8th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2008. The coin features a portrait of President Martin Van Buren, his name on top of his portrait, 8th PRESIDENT and 1837-1841 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Phebe Hemphill and designed by Joel Iskowitz while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 100 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2008-P Martin Van Buren – Position A

2008-D Martin Van Buren – Position A

2008-P Martin Van Buren – Position B

2008-D Martin Van Buren – Position B

Proofs

2008-S Martin Van Buren

Special Strikes

(2008) Martin Van Buren, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2008-P Martin Van Buren – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-D Martin Van Buren – Position A, Satin Finish

2008-P Martin Van Buren – Position B, Satin Finish

2008-D Martin Van Buren – Position B, Satin Finish

William Henry Harrison Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar William Henry Harrison, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 9th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2009. The coin features a portrait of President William Henry Harrison, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 9th PRESIDENT and 1841 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna while Don Everhart designed the reverse. Less than 100 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2009-P William Henry Harrison – Position A

2009-D William Henry Harrison – Position A

2009-P William Henry Harrison – Position B

2009-D William Henry Harrison – Position B

Proofs

2009-S William Henry Harrison

Special Strikes

2009-P William Henry Harrison – Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D William Henry Harrison – Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P William Henry Harrison – Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D William Henry Harrison – Position B, Satin Finish

(2009) William Henry Harrison, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

John Tyler Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar John Tyler, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 10th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2009. The coin features a portrait of President John Tyler, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 10th PRESIDENT and 1841-1845 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 80 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2009-P John Tyler – Position A

2009-D John Tyler – Position A

2009-P John Tyler – Position B

2009-D John Tyler – Position B

Proofs

2009-S John Tyler

Special Strikes

2009-P John Tyler – Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D John Tyler – Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P John Tyler – Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D John Tyler – Position B, Satin Finish

(2009) John Tyler, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

James K. Polk Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar James Polk, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 11th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2009. The coin features a portrait of President James K. Polk, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 11th PRESIDENT and 1845-1849 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Charles L. Vickers designed by Susan Gamble while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 80 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2009-P James K. Polk, Position A

2009-D James K. Polk, Position A

2009-P James K. Polk, Position B

2009-D James K. Polk, Position B

Proofs

2009-S James K. Polk

Special Strikes

2009-P James K. Polk- Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D James K. Polk- Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P James K. Polk- Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D James K. Polk- Position B, Satin Finish

(2009) James K. Polk, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

Zachary Taylor Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Zachary Taylor , Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 12th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2009. The coin features a portrait of President Zachary Taylor, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 12th PRESIDENT and 1849-1850 on the bottom. Don Everhart designed the obverse and reverse. More than 78 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2009-P Zachary Taylor, Position A

2009-D Zachary Taylor, Position A

2009-P Zachary Taylor, Position B

2009-D Zachary Taylor, Position B

Proofs

2009-S Zachary Taylor

Special Strikes

2009-P Zachary Taylor- Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D Zachary Taylor- Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P Zachary Taylor- Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D Zachary Taylor- Position B, Satin Finish

(2009) Zachary Taylor, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

Millard Fillmore Presidential Dollar

This was the 13th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2010. The coin features a portrait of President Millard Fillmore, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 13th PRESIDENT and 1850-1853 on the bottom. Don Everhart designed the obverse and reverse. More than 74 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2010-P Millard Fillmore, Position A

2010-D Millard Fillmore, Position A

2010-P Millard Fillmore, Position B

2010-D Millard Fillmore, Position B

Proofs

2010-S Millard Fillmore

Special Strikes

(2010) Millard Fillmore, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

2010-D Millard Fillmore – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D Millard Fillmore – Position B, Satin Finish

2010-P Millard Fillmore – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P Millard Fillmore – Position B, Satin Finish

Franklin Pierce Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Franklin Pierce, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 14th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2010. The coin features a portrait of President Franklin Pierce, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 14th PRESIDENT and 1853-1857 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Charles L. Vickers designed by Susan Gamble while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 76 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2010-P Franklin Pierce, Position A

2010-D Franklin Pierce, Position A

2010-P Franklin Pierce, Position B

2010-D Franklin Pierce, Position B

Proofs

2010-S Franklin Pierce

Special Strikes

(2010) Franklin Pierce, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

2010-D Franklin Pierce – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D Franklin Pierce – Position B, Satin Finish

2010-P Franklin Pierce – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P Franklin Pierce – Position B, Satin Finish

James Buchanan Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar James Buchanan, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 15th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2010. The coin features a portrait of President James Buchanan, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 15th PRESIDENT and 1857-1861 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill while Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 73 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2010-P James Buchanan, Position A

2010-D James Buchanan, Position A

2010-P James Buchanan, Position B

2010-D

Proofs

2010-S James Buchanan

2010-S James Buchanan – First Strike

Special Strikes

2010-P James Buchanan – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P James Buchanan – Position B, Satin Finish

2010-D James Buchanan – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D James Buchanan – Position B, Satin Finish

(2010) James Buchanan, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

Abraham Lincoln Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Abraham Lincoln, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 16th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one to be minted in 2010. The coin features a portrait of President Abraham Lincoln, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 16th PRESIDENT and 1861-1865 on the bottom. Don Everhart designed the obverse and reverse. More than 97 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2010-P Abraham Lincoln, Position A

2010-D Abraham Lincoln, Position A

2010-P Abraham Lincoln, Position B

2010-D Abraham Lincoln, Position B

(2010) Abrahan Lincoln, Missing Edge Lettering

Proofs

2010-S Abraham Lincoln

Special Strikes

(2010) Abrahan Lincoln, Satin Finish, Missing Edge Lettering

2010-D Abraham Lincoln – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D Abraham Lincoln – Position B, Satin Finish

2010-P Abraham Lincoln – Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P Abraham Lincoln – Position B, Satin Finish

Andrew Johnson Presidential Dollar

Дмитрий Никонов, 1 dollar Andew Johnson, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

This was the 17th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one minted in 2011. The coin features a portrait of President Andrew Johnson, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 17th PRESIDENT and 1865-1869 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 72 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2011-P Andrew Johnson, Position A

2011-D Andrew Johnson, Position A

2011-P Andrew Johnson, Position B

2011-D Andrew Johnson, Position B

Proofs

2011-S Andrew Johnson

2011-S Andrew Johnson – with Signature

Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Ulysses S. Grant $1 Presidential Coin obverse, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 18th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2011. The coin features a portrait of President Ulysses S. Grant, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 18th PRESIDENT and 1869-1877 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 76 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2011-P Ulysses S. Grant, Position A

2011-D Ulysses S. Grant, Position A

2011-P Ulysses S. Grant, Position B

2011-D Ulysses S. Grant, Position B

Proofs

2011-S Ulysses S. Grant

2011-S Ulysses S. Grant – with Signature

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Rutherford B. Hayes $1 Presidential Coin obverse, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 19th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2011. The coin features a portrait of President Rutherford B. Hayes, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 19th PRESIDENT and 1877-1881 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 74 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2011-P Rutherford B. Hayes, Position A

2011-D Rutherford B. Hayes, Position A

2011-P Rutherford B. Hayes, Position B

2011-D Rutherford B. Hayes, Position B

Proofs

2011-S Rutherford B. Hayes

2011-S Rutherford B. Hayes – with Signature

James A. Garfield Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, James Garfield $1 Presidential Coin obverse, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 20th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one to be minted in 2011. The coin features a portrait of President James A. Garfield, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 20th PRESIDENT and 1881 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill while by Don Everhart designed the reverse. More than 74 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2011-P James Garfield, Position A

2011-D James Garfield, Position A

2011-P James Garfield, Position B

2011-D James Garfield, Position B

Proofs

2011-S James Garfield

2011-S James Garfield – with Signature

Chester Arthur Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2012 Pres $1 Arthur unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 21st Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2012. The coin features a portrait of President Chester Arthur, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 21st PRESIDENT and 1881-1885 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 10 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2012-P Chester Arthur, Position A

2012-D Chester Arthur, Position A

2012-P Chester Arthur, Position B

2012-D Chester Arthur, Position B

Proofs

2012-S Chester A. Arthur

2012-S Chester A. Arthur – with Signature

Grover Cleveland Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2012 Pres $1 Cleveland1 unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 22nd Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2012. The coin features a portrait of President Grover Cleveland, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 22nd PRESIDENT and 1885-1889 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2012-P Grover Cleveland 22nd, Position A

2012-D Grover Cleveland 22nd, Position A

2012-P Grover Cleveland 22nd, Position B

2012-D Grover Cleveland 22nd, Position B

Proofs

2012-S Grover Cleveland 22nd

2012-S Grover Cleveland 22nd – with Signature

Benjamin Harrison Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2012 Pres $1 Harrison unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 23rd Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2012. The coin features a portrait of President Benjamin Harrison, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 23rd PRESIDENT and 1889-1893 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2012-P Benjamin Harrison, Position A

2012-D Benjamin Harrison, Position A

2012-P Benjamin Harrison, Position B

2012-D Benjamin Harrison, Position B

Proofs

2012-S Benjamin Harrison

2012-S Benjamin Harrison – with Signature

Grover Cleveland Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2012 Pres $1 Cleveland2 unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 24th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one to be minted in 2012. Since President Grover Cleveland was again seated in the position, the coin features a portrait of him, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 24th PRESIDENT and 1893-1897 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 13 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2012-P Grover Cleveland 24th, Position A

2012-D Grover Cleveland 24th, Position A

2012-P Grover Cleveland 24th, Position B

2012-D Grover Cleveland 24th, Position B

Proofs

2012-S Grover Cleveland 24th

2012-S Grover Cleveland 24th – with Signature

William McKinley Presidential Dollar

US Mint, 25 William McKinley 2000, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 25th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2013. The coin features a portrait of President William McKinley, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 25th PRESIDENT and 1897-1901 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. Less than 10 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2013-P William McKinley, Position A

2013-D William McKinley, Position A

2013-P William McKinley, Position B

2013-D William McKinley, Position B

Proofs

2013-S William McKinley

Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 26 Theodore Roosevelt 2000, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 26th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one minted in 2013. The coin features a portrait of President Theodore Roosevelt, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 26th PRESIDENT and 1901-1909 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2013-P Theodore Roosevelt, Position A

2013-D Theodore Roosevelt, Position A

2013-P Theodore Roosevelt, Position B

2013-D Theodore Roosevelt, Position B

Proofs

2013-S Theodore Roosevelt

William Howard Taft Presidential Dollar

US Mint, 27 William Howard Taft 2000, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 27th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2013. The coin features a portrait of President William Howard Taft, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 27th PRESIDENT and 1909-1913 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Michael Gaudioso and designed by Barbara Fox while the reverse was designed by Don Everhart. More than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2013-P William Howard Taft, Position A

2013-D William Howard Taft, Position A

2013-P William Howard Taft, Position B

2013-D William Howard Taft, Position B

Proofs

2013-S William H. Taft

Woodrow Wilson Presidential Dollar

US Mint, 28 Woodrow Wilson 2000, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 28th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2013. The coin features a portrait of President Woodrow Wilson, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 28th PRESIDENT and 1913-1921 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. Less than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2013-P Woodrow Wilson, Position A

2013-D Woodrow Wilson, Position A

2013-P Woodrow Wilson, Position B

2013-D Woodrow Wilson, Position B

Proofs

2013-S Woodrow Wilson

Warren G. Harding Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 14 Harding Dollar Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 29th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2014. The coin features a portrait of President Warren G. Harding, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 29th PRESIDENT and 1921-1923 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Michael Gaudioso and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2014-P Warren G. Harding, Position A

2014-D Warren G. Harding, Position A

2014-P Warren G. Harding Position B

2014-D Warren G. Harding Position B

Proofs

2014-S Warren G. Harding

Calvin Coolidge Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Coolidge Unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 30th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one minted in 2014. The coin features a portrait of President Calvin Coolidge, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 30th PRESIDENT and 1923-1929 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2014-P Calvin Coolidge Position A

2014-P Calvin Coolidge Position B

2014-D Calvin Coolidge Position A

2014-D Calvin Coolidge Position B

Proofs

2014-S Calvin Coolidge

Herbert Hoover Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2014 Hoover Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 31st Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one to be minted in 2014. The coin features a portrait of President Herbert Hoover, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 31st PRESIDENT and 1929-1933 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. Less than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2014-P Herbert Hoover Position A

2014-P Herbert Hoover Position B

2014-D Herbert Hoover Position A

2014-D Herbert Hoover Position B

Proofs

2014-S Herbert Hoover

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2014 Roosevelt Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 32nd Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2014. The coin features a portrait of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 32nd PRESIDENT and 1933-1945 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2014-P Franklin D. Roosevelt Position A

2014-P Franklin D. Roosevelt Position B

2014-D Franklin D. Roosevelt Position A

2014-D Franklin D. Roosevelt Position B

Proofs

2014-S Franklin D. Roosevelt

Harry S Truman Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, 2015 Truman Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 33rd Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2015. The coin features a portrait of President Harry S Truman, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 33rd PRESIDENT and 1945-1853 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. Less than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2015-P Harry S. Truman, Position A

2015-P Harry S. Truman, Position B

2015-D Harry S. Truman, Position A

2015-D Harry S. Truman, Position B

Proofs

2015-S Harry S. Truman

2015-P Harry S. Truman Rev Proof

Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Eisenhower Unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 34th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one to be minted in 2015. The coin features a portrait of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 34th PRESIDENT and 1853-1961 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Joseph Menna and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 8 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower, Position A

2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower, Position B

2015-D Dwight D. Eisenhower, Position A

2015-D Dwight D. Eisenhower, Position B

(2015) Missing Edge Lettering

Proofs

2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower Rev PR

2015-S Dwight D. Eisenhower

John F. Kennedy Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, Kennedy Unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 35th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd one minted in 2015. The coin features a portrait of President John F. Kennedy, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 35th PRESIDENT and 1961-1963 on the bottom. The obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart. More than 11 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2015-P John F. Kennedy, Position A

2015-P John F. Kennedy, Position B

2015-D John F. Kennedy, Position A

2015-D John F. Kennedy, Position B

Proofs

2015-S John F. Kennedy

Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Dollar

United States Mint, LJohnson Unc, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 36th Presidential Dollar and the 4th and last one minted in 2015. The coin features a portrait of President Lyndon B. Johnson, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 36th PRESIDENT and 1963-1969 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Jim Licaretz and Michael Gaudioso and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 12 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2015-P Lyndon B. Johnson, Position A

2015-P Lyndon B. Johnson, Position B

2015-D Lyndon B. Johnson, Position A

2015-D Lyndon B. Johnson, Position B

Proofs

2015-S Lyndon B. Johnson

Richard Nixon Presidential Dollar

Mikhail Numismat, 1 dollar coin 2016 Richard Nixon, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 37th Presidential Dollar and the 1st one to be minted in 2016. The coin features a portrait of President Richard Nixon, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 37th PRESIDENT and 1969-1974 on the bottom. The obverse and the reverse designed by Don Everhart. More than 9 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2016-P Richard M. Nixon, Position A

2016-P Richard M. Nixon, Position B

2016-D Richard M. Nixon, Position A

2016-D Richard M. Nixon, Position B

Proofs

2016-S Richard Nixon

Gerald Ford Presidential Dollar

This was the 38th Presidential Dollar and the 2nd one minted in 2016. The coin features a portrait of President Gerald Ford, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 38th PRESIDENT and 1974-1977 on the bottom. The obverse was designed by Phebe Hemphill and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 10 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2016-P Gerald R. Ford, Position A

2016-P Gerald R. Ford, Position B

2016-D Gerald R. Ford, Position A

2016-D Gerald R. Ford, Position B

Proofs

2016-S Gerald Ford

Ronald Reagan Presidential Dollar

Crashguy42, Ronald Reagan Coin, Size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This was the 39th Presidential Dollar and the 3rd and last one minted in 2016. The coin features a portrait of President Ronald Reagan, his name on top of his portrait, IN GOD WE TRUST, 40th PRESIDENT and 1981-1989 on the bottom. The obverse was sculpted by Joseph Menna and designed by Richard Masters and the reverse by Don Everhart. More than 13 million pieces were minted.

Regular Strike

2016-P Ronald Reagan, Position A

2016-P Ronald Reagan, Position B

2016-D Ronald Reagan, Position A

2016-D Ronald Reagan, Position B

Proofs

2016-S Ronald Reagan

Collecting Presidential $1 Coins

Because there were many Presidential Dollars as well as lots of varieties and error, it makes an exciting collection for every coin collector and enthusiast. Those dated in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2015 with Missing Edge Letterings are considered the major varieties while the minor varieties included those with double inverted edge lettering, double overlapped edge lettering and weak and partial edge lettering are considered minor varieties.

Coin Collectors usually collect all Presidential Dollars issued per year without bothering for the mint mar. One can purchase PCGS-graded Presidential Dollar Coins starting at $1.00 up to $6,500.00 in Regular Strikes and $4.00-$1,000.00 for Proofs/Special Strikes.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, United States Mint, My Coin Guide

 

The Sacagawea Dollar

After the final days Susan Anthony Dollars, a new coin emerged with a surprising twist – it was dollar coin with a Gold color that is a result of years of planning, research, and deliberation. Years of downplaying what was known as a “coin failure”, the Anthony Dollars was succeeded by a dollar coin with a reeded edge and is made up of Copper, Zinc, Manganese, and Nickel. It first appeared in the year 2000 and was called the Sacagawea Dollar or the Golden Dollar.

Coin collectors and enthusiasts alike rejoiced upon learning about the birth of the Sacagawea Dollar – a new $1 coin to add to their collection. By the year 2009, the excitement skyrocketed after a new series was issued – Sacagawea Dollars with a new design on the reverse. It has a rich history and the portrait on the Sacagawea Dollar makes it a great collection for for coin enthusiasts and collectors alike.

The History of the Sacagawea Dollar

A report made by the Research Triangle Institute concluded that a new coin is in order. During one of their research, they came to a conclusion that although dollar bills are more convenient to use thanks to its weight and the barely there space it occupies, coins are still a much better choice. Paper bills are not only too prone to damages – these only have a lifespan of 18 months as opposed to that of a coin – which was 25-30 years.

This research report made its way to the Congress, and the next year, the Anthony Dollar was born. However, the idea of coinage did not settle with the public, and eventually chose the familiar paper money instead of the dollar coin.

Years have passed and the idea of minting a new coin resurfaced. A legislation was signed on December 1, 1997, by President Bill Clinton known as the United States Dollar Coin Act of 1997. The said Act authorized the creation of a new dollar coin to replace the Susan Anthony Dollar Coin without making the same mistake that caused the failure of the Anthony Dollar. The coin was meant to be visibly distinct – something that won’t resemble the quarter so as not to confuse the public.

Sacagawea was chosen as the main design of the coin. The young female was a Shoshone Indian who assisted the expedition of Lewis and Clark. She was only fifteen years old and is pregnant at the time she and her husband, Toussaint Charbonneau were employed by the two adventurers to guide them through the Great Plains going to the Pacific Ocean and then making their way back home.

Her great contributions were far greater than guiding the expedition and acting as their translator to do trades, but she was also able to provide the much-needed knowledge her companions needed to survive the trip. She also safely recovered the journals that recorded their travel even while her baby was strapped on her back, and was able to negotiate with Native Americans – eventually letting them go home with no casualties.

With more than enough reasons to honor her and her name, she was chosen as the face of the new dollar coin. The problem is, there was no portrait that the US Mint can use for the coin, so they made use of Randy’L Teton’s features, an Indian who came from the same tribe as Sacagawea.

The Sacagawea Dollar’s obverse was designed by Glenna Goodacre – a sculptor from New Mexico. His initials GG can be found on Sacagawea ‘s shawl. The reverse, on the other hand, was designed by Thomas D. Rogers, Sr., US Mint Engraver, and Sculptor. His reverse features an American Eagle and his initials TDR appears on the Eagle’s tail.

The Sacagawea Dollars were minted in three US Mints – Philadelphia and Denver Mints struck coins intended for circulation while the San Francisco Mint produced proofs, although a single issue was produced in the West Point Mint where 22 karats Gold Sacagawea Dollars (Proof) were minted. These were issued in March 2000 and was met with mixed reviews.

The new Sacagawea Dollar was advertised through televisions, but only coin collectors were educated enough to know that the so-called Golden Dollars were not made of Gold. Since these were made up of Copper, Nickel, Zinc and Manganese, the color of the coin changed from a Golden color to a dark mustard overtime.

By 2009, Sacagawea Dollar Coins were minted with various designs on the reverse. The reason is to honor different Native Americans.

The Detailed Specifications of the Sacagawea Dollars

AKS.9955, 1 Dollar (United States), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Sacagawea Dollar has an outer layer made up of a Manganese-Brass which was banded with a pure copper core. The composition was 88.5% Copper, 6% Zinc, 3.5 Manganese, and 2% Nickel. It weighs about 8.10 grams, is 26.50 millimeters in diameter and has a plain edge.  It has a border that looked to be unusual, giving it a medallic look.

The Sacagawea Dollar Design 2000-2008

The Obverse

AKS.9955, 1 Dollar (United States), front, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY 4.0

The obverse was designed by Glenna Goodacre. It features a three-quarter profile of Sacagawea with large dark eyes. Strapped on her back as her infant, Jean Baptiste. The legend LIBERTY is on top of her in a form of an arc. The inscriptions IN GOD WE TRUST was inscribed on the left side of the coin while the date is on the right just below her chin and the respective mintmark where the coin was minted. Goodacre’s initials (GG) are on the lower left portion of the coin, on Sacagawea’s shawl.

The Reverse

United States Mint, 2003 Sacagawea Rev, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

As for the reverse, an American Eagle is seen soaring on the back of the coin and was being surrounded by seventeen stars that were strategically placed encircling the Eagle. E PLURIBUS UNUM inside the stars, located just above the head of the Eagle. The legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is seen in a form of an arc above the stars and Eagle while the denomination ONE DOLLAR is on the lowest part of the reverse. The initials of Thomas D. Rogers, Sr. (TDR) is seen on the right after the R in DOLLAR. This design for the reverse stayed up until 2008.

2009 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2009NativeAmericanRev, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

By 2009, the reverse was replaced with what was called “The Three Sisters method of planting.” The design was sculpted by Norman E. Nemeth and depicts a Native American in a field of corns, beans, and squash while planting seeds. The obverse stayed the same – with the exemption of date and mintmark which were both removed from the design. The edges from this year and the succeeding years are now lettered edges.

2010 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2010NativeAmerican Rev, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

A Hiawatha Belt which was surrounded by five arrows replaced the 2009 reverse design. These depict the five confederacy nations – namely Onondaga, Mohawk, Cayuga, Oneida, and Seneca. Haudenosaunee was inscribed just below the belt and arrows while Great Law of Peace is on the lowest part of the coin. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is on the top portion of the reverse followed by the denomination $1. This was designed by Thomas Cleveland. CLV initials are on one of the arrows’ feathers.

2011 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2011NativeAmericanRev, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The theme for this year’s Sacagawea Dollars was “Diplomacy – Treaties with Tribal Nations.” A peace pipe was seen which was passed on the hands of Massasoit of the Wampanoag Nation and Plymouth Bay’s settler governor. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is still on the topmost part of the coin followed by the denomination $1. Wampanoag Treaty 1621 is written below the hands. It was designed by Richard Masters and while Joseph Menna did the sculpting.

2012 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, Sacagawea dollar reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The theme Trade Routes in the 17th Century was used wherein a Native American and a horse is featured in the reverse along with three horses running in the background. $1 denomination is placed below the running horses while the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA was strategically placed in a form of an arc above the horse. This was designed by Thomas Cleveland and sculpted by Phebe Hemphill. From this year onwards, all Sacagawea Dollar produced are only made and distributed among collectors.

2013 Sacagawea Dollar

AgentVpiski787, The Delaware Treaty coin, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0

Susan Gamble designed the reverse of the 2013 Sacagawea Dollar. It features a turkey, turtle and a howling wolf – a symbolism for the tribe in Delaware.  In the level of the wolf’s chest lies the denomination $1 and the three animals were surrounded by an arc of stars. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA was position on the top of the stars while Treaty With The Delawares and the date was below the animals.

2014 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2014 Native American Coin, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

This 2014 Sacagawea Dollar features a male Native American holding a ceremonial pipe and a female, her wife was holding a plate of crops. William Clark’s compass is seen in the background displaying the word NW (northwest). The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is on an arc on the left side of the coin while the denomination $1 is on the right.

2015 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2015 Native American Coin, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Phebe Hemphill engraved the design made by Ronald D. Sanders on the reverse. A Mohawk high iron worker is depicted while reaching for a swinging I-beam. The city’s skyline is pictured on an elevated view and the inscriptions Mohawk Ironworkers below it. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is inscribed on top while the denomination $1 is in between the bean and skyline.

2016 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2016 Native American Coin, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Thomas D. Rogers Sr. designed a reverse with two soldier helmets and feathers behind each are strategically placed to form the letter V. Rogers Sr.’s initials TDR just below the left helmet and feather, WWI on the far left and WWII on the far right. The UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and $1 is on top of the coin while CODE TALKERS on the lowest part of the reverse.

2017 Sacagawea Dollar

Designed by Chris Costello, engraved by Charles L. Vickers, image created for the U.S. Mint, 2017 Native American dollar reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Chris Costello designed the reverse while Charles L. Vickers sculpted it. A Native American is seen writing with a feather pen and the word Sequoyah placed next to his face. The legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and Sequoyah from Cherokee Nation written in syllabary are on the top of the coin. $1 and initials CTC are on the lower side of the coin near the feather pen.

2018 Sacagawea Dollar

United States Mint, 2018 Native American Dollar Reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Jim Thorpe was depicted showing his Olympic and Football achievements. His name HIM THORPE is on the top of the coin in a form of an arc, followed by $1 and WA-THO-HUK and the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA situated on the lowest portion of the coin. This was designed by Michael Gaudioso.

The Sacagawea Dollars can be classified into two:

 

  • Sacagawea Dollar (2000-2008)

 

This has the original obverse and reverse designs. It has coins struck in regulars strikes, proofs, and special strikes.

Regular Strikes

2000-P Sacagawea Dollar – a total of 767,140,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint with the following variants

2000-P Mule w/State 25C Obv

2000-P “Cheerios” Dollar

2000-P Wounded Eagle

2000-D Sacagawea Dollar – a total of 518,916,000 coins were minted at the Denver Mint with the following variant

2000-D Millennium Set

2001-P – a total of 62,468,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2001-D – a total of 70,939,500 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2002-P – a total of 3,865,610 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2002-D – a total of 3,732,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2003-P – a total of 3,080,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2003-D – a total of 3,080,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2004-P – a total of 2,660,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2004-D – a total of 2,660,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2005-P – a total of 2,525,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2005-D – a total of 2,520,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2006-P – a total of 4,900,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2006-D – a total of 2,800,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

2007-P – a total of 3,640,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2007-D – a total of 3,920,000 with the following variant

2007-D Edge Lettering

2008-P – a total of 1,820,000 pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint

2008-D – a total of 14,840,000 pieces were minted at the Denver Mint

Proofs

2000-S – a total of 3,082,483 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2000-W 22kt Gold – a total of 39 pieces were minted at the West Point Mint

2001-S – a total of 3,184,606 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2002-S – a total of 3,211,995 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2003-S – a total of 3,298,439 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2004-S – a total of 2,985,000 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2005-S – a total of 3,300,000 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2006-S – a total of 3,054,436 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2007-S – a total of 2,062,793 pieces were minted at the San Francisco Mint

2008-S – mintage not available

Special Strikes

2000-P Goodacre Presentation

2005-P Satin Finish

2005-D Satin Finish

2006-P Satin Finish  

2006-D Satin Finish

2007-P Satin Finish

2007-D Satin Finish

2008-P Satin Finish

2008-D Satin Finish

(2010) Native American, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

 

  • Native American Sacagawea Dollar (2009 to date)

 

After 2008, the obverse was stripped of the date and mintmark and every year starting 2009, a new design is used for the reverse. Cons were struck in regular strikes, proofs, and special strikes.

Regular Strikes

2009 Native American, Missing Edge Lettering

2009-P Native American, Position A

2009-P Native American, Position B

2009-D Native American, Position A

2009-D Native American, Position B

2010-P Native American, Position A

2010-D Native American, Position A

2010-P Native American, Position B

2010-D Native American, Position B

2011-P Native American, Position A

2011-P Weak Edge Lettering

2011-D Native American, Position A

2011-P Native American, Position B

2011-D Native American, Position B

2012-P Native American, Position A

2012-D Native American, Position A

2012-P Native American, Position B

2012-D Native American, Position B

2013-P Treaty with the Delawares, Position A

2013-D Treaty with the Delawares, Position A

2013-P Treaty with the Delawares, Position B

2013-D Treaty with the Delawares, Position B

2014-P Native American, Position A

2014-P Native American, Position B

2014-D Native American, Position A

2014-D Native American, Position B

2014-D Native American Enhanced

Proofs

2009-S Native American

2010-S Native American

2014-S Native American

2011-S Native American

2012-S Native American

2013-S Native American

Special Strikes

(2009) Native American, Missing Edge Lettering, Satin Finish

2009-P Native American, Position A, Satin Finish

2009-P Native American, Position B, Satin Finish

2009-D Native American, Position A, Satin Finish

2009-D Native American, Position B, Satin Finish

2010-P Native American, Position A, Satin Finish

2010-D Native American, Position A, Satin Finish

2010-P Native American, Position B, Satin Finish

2010-D Native American, Position B, Satin Finish

Collecting Sacagawea Dollars

No one can deny that Sacagawea Dollar coins are beautiful coins worthy of collecting. There are rarities and errors sought-after by coin collectors.

The following are the rarities or key dates when it comes to collecting Sacagawea Dollar Coins.

2000-P Cheerios Dollars

When the US Mint started to mint the Sacagawea Dollars, they gave away some of these in boxes of Cheerios that were specially marked by the US Mint. It was only when regular issued Sacagawea Dollars were issued that people started to notice the difference between the two. The rare issues placed on the specially marked Cheerios boxes have crisp and sharp details on the tail feathers of the Eagle while the regular issued Sacagawea Dollars have tail feathers that were not enhanced.

2000-P Goodacre Presentation Specimens

This special strike coin was given a proof or specimen-like look after these were struck on burnished plankets.no one is reported to have a collection of this specimen.

2000-P Wounded Eagle Die Variety

The die used in this variety has three raised die flaws which resulted in a cut on the Eagle’s wing and torso. The exact cause of the flaw hasn’t been pinpointed but it was reported that less than 200 were minted with this error.

2007 Sacagawea Dollar with Edge Lettering

When the US Mint began issuing Presidential Dollars, some Sacagawea Dollars were minted with edge lettering instead of the plain one. It was only in the year 2009 that the Sacagawea Dollar adapted the edge lettering. One should be vigilant if you happen to stumble on 2007 Sacagawea Dollars with edge lettering as these can be easily manipulated. Authentication is needed to make sure you get an original instead of the fabricated 2007 Sacagawea Dollar with edge lettering.

One can buy PCGS-graded Sacagawea Dollars starting $1.00 up to $12,500.00 for Regular Strikes while Proofs can range from $4.00-$40.00. As for Special Strike Sacagawea Dollars, the price can range between $2.00-$8,000.00.

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coin Facts, NGC Coin, Coin Facts, My Coin Guides

The Trade Dollar

Being one of the shortest-lived series in the history of the American Numismatics, coin collectors have been enjoying collecting Trade Dollars. Because Silver Coins, including the Trade Dollars, were big, fun to collect and not to mention having a high Silver Content only adds to the thrill of the hunt. Before, these called Commercial Dollars since these were meant to be used as money for export, but were soon coined as Trade Dollars.

History of the Trade Dollar

In the early 1870s, the United States has been having problems with international commerce, specifically, in China. China has always favored the Eight Reale or the Mexican Peso due to its high silver content. During this type, the US have been using Liberty Dollars which were hesitantly accepted by China during the trade. Not only that – these are accepted at a discounted price only to be melted afterward.

The reason for this was the Liberty Dollar have a lesser amount of Pure Silver content and a lesser fineness on it. Merchants in China were able to recognize this, thus favoring the obvious choice – the Mexican Peso. The Congress needed to make a decision, and fast, so the US Treasury Department created a coin that will be used for international trade. Thus, the Act of Feb. 12, 1873, was born.

It was in 1873 that the first Trade Dollar was minted, with the purpose of competing with the Mexican Dollar. It was designed by US Mint Chief Engraver William Barber and a large number of the Trade Dollar were minted at the Philadelphia Mint. Majority of the Trade Dollars minted during 1873-1874 were mostly used for commercial trade. Chinese merchants have tried and tested the authenticity of the Trade Dollar, which is why many of these silver dollars had chop marks indicating their personal trademarks in Chinese Characters.

The Trade Dollar features Miss Liberty facing right while the reverse features an Eagle clutching an olive branch and three arrows using its talons. It was slightly heavier than the regular silver dollar, weighing 420 grains and with a fineness of .900.

The Trade Dollar was minted from July 1873 up to April 1878. During 1873-1874 the first 2 years of the production of Trade Dollars were used for trade in the Orient. It was intended for international commerce but was also used as a legal tender – amounting up to $5 for about four years.

By 1875, these were used more in the US. There are some who bought Trade Dollars with the purpose of using them for their bullion value – these are employers who used the Trade Dollars for their face value as payment for their workers. As a result, the workers suffered as the Trade Dollars were either accepted for their bullion value, a lower price or worse, refused.

In 1876 the price of Silver has already declined, resulting to a huge amount of Trade Dollars to be sent back to the US. By 1878, the Sherman Silver Act was passed thanks to John Sherman. This Act mandated to stop the production of Trade Dollars. No business strike Trade Dollars were struck at this time – only Proof coins. Congress has already canceled the authorization given to the Trade Dollar, and eventually, unblemished Trade Coins were retrieved.

The Detailed Specification of the Trade Dollar

Designed by Christian Gobrecht for the US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1873-1$-Seated Liberty (Trade dollar), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Trade Dollar was designed by William Barber. It weighs approximately 27.20 grams, has a reeded edge, is 38.10 in diameter and is made up of 90% Silver and 10% Copper. Trade Dollars were minted from 1873-1875 in US Mints located in Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Carson City. The largest Trade Dollar producing mint was the Philadelphia Mint, while the Carson City Mint has the lowest mintages.

Department of the Treasury, Bureau of the Mint, TradeDollarObverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

For the obverse, Miss Liberty is seen seated on a bale or merchandise, facing right. On her left hand is a ribbon where the word LIBERTY was inscribed with a wheat sheaf behind it and the sea in front. On her right hand, she is holding an olive branch. IN GOD WE TRUST was written on the foot of the bale, the date below it and 13 stars surrounding Miss Liberty in a form of an arc.

Department of the Treasury, Bureau of the Mint, TradeDollarReverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

For the reverse, a perched, Bald Eagle is holding three arrows and an olive branch on its talons. A ribbon above the Eagle read E PLURIBUS UNUM, and the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA in a form of an arc lays above the Eagle and ribbon. 420 GRAINS, 900 Fine are written just below the Eagle, followed by the mintmark if any (CC for Carson City, S for San Francisco while Philadelphia bears no mintmark) and the words TRADE DOLLAR on the lowest part of the coin.

The following are the Regular Strikes of the Trade Dollar

1873 Trade Dollar – 396,635 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1873-CC Trade Dollar – 124,500 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1873-S Trade Dollar – 703,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1874 Trade Dollar – 987,100 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1874-CC Trade Dollar – 1,373,200 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1874-S Trade Dollar – 2,549,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1875 Trade Dollar – 218,200 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1875-CC Trade Dollar – 1,573,700 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1875-S Trade Dollar – 4,487,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1875-S S/CC Over mintmark Trade Dollar – 4,487,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1876 Trade Dollar – 455,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1876-CC Trade Dollar – 509,000 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1876-S Trade Dollar – 5,227,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1877 Trade Dollar – 3,039,200 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1877-CC Trade Dollar – 534,000 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1877-S Trade Dollar – 9,519,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1878-CC Trade Dollar – 97,000 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1878-S Trade Dollar – 4,162,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

The following are Proofs Trade Dollar

1873 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 865 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1874 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 700 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1875 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 700 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1876 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 1,150 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1877 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 510 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1878 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 900 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1879 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 1,541 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1880 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 1,987 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1881 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 960 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1882 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 1,097 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1883 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 979 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1884 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 10 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1885 Trade Dollar (Proof) – 5 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Collecting Trade Dollars

When it comes to Trade Dollars, it is important to note that the places to look for wear are Miss Liberty’s ear, breast, and her left knee, as well as the head of the Eagle and its left wing.

Prices for regular strike coins range from $60.00 to $250,000.00 depending on the rarity and grade of the coin. For Proofs, prices range from $1,000.00 up to $3,750,000.00.

Great finds are the Trade Dollars dated 1873, 1873-CC, 1874, 1874-CC, 1875, 1875-S, 1876, 1876-CC, 1877-CC, 1878-CC and 1878-S – the 1878-CC Trade Dollar being the rarest of them all.

The Ultra Rare Trade Dollars most sought-after by coin collectors are the 1884 (Proof) and 1885 (Proof). There are only 10 known 1884 Proofs and 5 1885 Proofs known to exist. These two proofs were kept and minted in secret by the US Mint, and it wasn’t only when

According to PCGS, 1884 Proof Trade Dollars are worth $450,000.00-$1,250,000.00. As for 1885 Proofs, price ranges from $1,750,000.00-$3,750,000.00. For a price guide on PCGS-graded Trade Dollar Coins, you use this link.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, tradedollars.net, Coin Week

The Liberty Seated Dollars

The Liberty Seated Dollar was the coin that succeeded the Draped Bust Dollar, particularly the 1804 Draped Bust Heraldic Eagles. It was in the year 1840 when the nation’s coinage system was all about Silver and Gold coins, and when paper money was still considered worthless by the public. And so, the US Mint worked hard to create a Silver Dollar Coin that will be used in the circulation.

Robert Maskell Patterson, the US Mint Director back then have always been a huge admirer of the British Copper Coinage – particularly the Seated Brittania. with this, he envisioned a new Silver Dollar Coin that would truly embody an emblematic portrait of Lady Liberty. Thus, he went to work and employed Thomas Sully, a renowned portrait painter to create the design for the new Miss Liberty similar to that of that Seated Brittania.

Sully obliged and began to create sketches of Miss Liberty while she sits on a rock while wearing a gorgeous Grecian robe. On her right arm, she is holding a pole with a small Liberty Cap on the top, while her left arms can be seen supporting a Union shield where the legend Liberty is inscribed on a scroll.

Once the sketch is done, Christian Gobrechtm the US Mint Engraver Assistant went to work and used Sully’s portrait of Miss Liberty to make it suitable for coinage. These were used in bass-relief art and the design appeared on some dimes, half-dimes, quarters, dollars, half-dollars and 20 cents minted from 1836 up until 1891.

The final design used for the Liberty Seated Dollar was Miss Liberty having a rounded head and her right long arm dangling while her left arm appears to be remarkably shorter. Patterns for the Liberty Seated Dollars in 1836 and 1839 have the artist’s signature but bearing no stars on the obverse. As for the reverse’s original design, a magnificent Eagle is featured flying in a plain or starry sky. Unfortunately, the No Motto Silver Dollar Coin that was minted during 1840-1865 replaced the flying Eagle with one that has a shield on its chest and dropped wings. Miss Liberty is seen seated with 13 stars surrounding her and the date placed below.

The No Motto Seated Liberty Dollar do no bear the IN GOD WE TRUST motto just yet. Each coin bears the mintmark of the Mints that produced them: those minted in Philadelphia bears no mint mark, those minted in the San Francisco Mint has the mintmark S while those made in New Orleans has the mintmark O. The series consists of 2,895,673 pieces of coins struck.

Starting 1866, the Seated Liberty Dollar was minted with the motto In God We Trust. The reason behind this was US Mint Director James Pollock received a letter sent by Salmon P. Chase, current US Mint Director at that time. The letter by Chase suggested that all US Coins bear the motto IN GOD WE TRUST as a form of recognition of deity.

Wasting no time, Pollock set to work and had patterns created with the suggested motto. He sent these to Secretary Chase together with a letter suggesting that the motto is shortened to GOD, OUR TRUST. Pollock felt the idea was concise, and suggested that the placement of the motto be placed on the just above the eagle, within a scroll on the reverse side of the coin.

Half dollars, as well as Eagles, were struck in patterns bearing the motto GOD OUR TRUST with dates 1861 and 1862. More patterns were minted from 1863-1865 bearing the mottos GOD OUR TRUST, IN GOD WE TRUST and GOD AND OUR COUNTRY.

Finally, in 1865, Secretary Chase approved a motto. IN GOD WE TRUST appeared on US Coins and finally, the Seated Liberty Dollar was minted with the said motto after the Mint Act of March 3, 1865, authorized this on Gold and Silver Coins.

Seated Liberty Dollars with Motto were minted from 1866 up to 1873. The obverse features Miss Liberty seated on a boulder while supporting a shield of the union on her right hand and the word LIBERTY inscribed on it. She was holding a pole on her left hand where a Liberty cap is topped. She was surrounded by a total of 13 stars.

On the other side of the coin, an Eagle is seen with its wings outstretched. It has the union shield placed on its chest while grasping a single olive branch on one talon and three arrows on the other. Surrounding the Eagle above is the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the denomination ONE DOL. Below the Eagle. Those US Mints that bear their respective mintmarks can be seen directly below the Eagle.

This design bears a powerful message. Freedom is reflected in the Liberty cap while the unity of the nation is marked by the Union Shield while the motto IN GOD WE TRUST is the religious statement that is equivalent to a prayer.

Those Seated Liberty Dollars bearing the Motto may have low mintages but were nevertheless used well by the public. according to records, 3.6 million pieces of the Seated Liberty Dollars with Motto were minted while 6.060 pieces of proof coins were produced. By 1873, the US Coinage System was standardized with Gold Coins, where the Coinage Act of 1873 was named The Crime of ’73.

The Seated Liberty Dollars were made up of 90% Silver and 10% Copper. They have reeded edges, weighs about 26.73 grams and are 39 millimeters in diameter.

The Four Types of Seated Liberty Dollars

Type 1 Flying Eagle Reverse with Stars Seated Liberty Dollars

The first Seated Liberty Dollars minted in 1836 features a flying Eagle surrounded by strategically placed stars on the reverse side of the coin. These were all proof coins that were the original designs made by Gobrecht.

1836 Original – Coin Alignment Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1836 Original – Medal Alignment Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Type 2 Flying Eagle Reverse with no Stars Seated Liberty Dollars

Only one Proof was minted with the reverse featuring no stars. The Eagle on the 1839 Seated Liberty Eagle was a bit more conservative – an adaptation from the Gold Coins issued in earlier years.

1839 Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 300 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Type 3 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars

Designed by Christian Gobrecht for the US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1865-1$-Seated Liberty (no motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Regular-strike coins were finally issued in 1840 up until 1865 bearing no motto. This was the first large-scale minting of Seated Liberty Dollars with a design parallel of the other earlier issues – Seated Miss Liberty is surrounded with 13 stars while the Eagle on the reverse side of the coin no longer has the scattered stars.

Regular Strikes

1840 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 61,005 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1841 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 173,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1842 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 184,618 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1843 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 165,100 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1844 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 20,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1845 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 24,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1846 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 110,600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1846-O No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 59,000 coins were minted in New Orleans

1847 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 140,750 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1848 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 15,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1849 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 62,600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1850 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 7,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1850-O No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 40,000 coins were minted in New Orleans

1851 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,300 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1852 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,100 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1853 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 46,110 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1854 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 33,140 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1855 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 26,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1856 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 63,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1857 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 94,490 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1859 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 255,700 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1859-O No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 360,000 coins were minted in New Orleans

1859-S No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 20,000 coins were minted in San Francisco

1860 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 217,600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1860-O No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 515,000 coins were minted in New Orleans

1861 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 77,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1862 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 11,540 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1863 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 27,200 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1864 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 30,700 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1865 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 46,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Proofs

1840 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1841 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1842 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1843 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1844 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1845 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1846 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 20 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1847 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1848 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1849 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 15 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1850 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 20 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1851 Restrike No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 35 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1852 Original No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 3 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1852 Restrike No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 35 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1853 Restrike No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 12 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1854 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 30 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1855 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 60 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1856 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 50 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1857 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 50 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1858 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 300 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1859 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 800 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1860 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 1,330 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1861 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 1,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1862 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 550 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1863 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 460 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1864 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 470 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1865 No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1866 No Motto No Motto Seated Liberty Dollars (Proof) – a total of 3 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Type 4 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars

Designed by Christian Gobrecht for the US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1873-1$-Seated Liberty (motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The last type of Seated Liberty Dollars were minted with the motto IN GOD WE TRUST located on a ribbon on the reverse side of the coin.

Regular Strikes

1866 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 48,900 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1867 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 46,900 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1868 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 162,100 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1869 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 423,700 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1870 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 415,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1870-CC With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 12,462 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1870-S With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 15 coins were minted in San Francisco

1871 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,074,760 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1871-CC With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,376 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1872 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,105,500 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1872-CC With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 3,150 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1872-S With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 9,000 coins were minted in San Francisco

1873 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 293,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1873-CC With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 2,300 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1873-S With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 700 coins were minted in San Francisco

Proofs

1866 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 725 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1867 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 625 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1868 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1869 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1870 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 1,000 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1871 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 960 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1872 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 950 coins were minted in Philadelphia

1873 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars – a total of 600 coins were minted in Philadelphia

Collecting Seated Liberty Dollars

All Seated Liberty Dollars can be considered as a numismatic treasure. In collecting Seated Liberty Dollars, some of the rarities include 1851, 1852 and 1858 With Motto Seated Liberty Dollars. When grading Mint State Seated Liberty Dollar coins, most have either abrasions, bag marks and even softly struck coins.

The places to look for signs of wear are Miss Liberty’s hair above the eye, her breast, and her right leg. Silver coin collectors usually collect Seated Liberty Dollars as type coins for the reason that most of these are hard to fin at affordable prices. Most collectors will have No Motto and With Motto variants.

The price ranges from $130.00-$250,000.00 for PCGS-graded Seated Liberty Coins. All Carson City minted coins are considered the keydates for the Seated Liberty Collars: 1870-CC, 1871-CC, 1872-CC and 1873-CC.

References:

PCGS, PCGS Coinfacts, NGC Coin, US Coin Values Advisor, Coin Facts

The Saint Gaudens $20 Gold Coin

The Saint Gaudens $20 Gold Coin, an undeniably beautiful coin with a spectacular design was created thanks to President Theodore Roosevelt’s unique relationship with a popular sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens. President Roosevelt has always been an advocate for quintessential change, and the US coinage system became one of his subjects. Because of him, many coins were redesigned, including the $20 Liberty Head Gold Coin.

Since President Roosevelt has already been pleased with  Saint-Gaudens’ works and designs, he asked him to create a new design for the $20 Gold Coin, to which Saint-Gaudens gingerly accepted. They exchanged many letters discussing the design the Saint-Gaudens will make, and President Roosevelt’s idea was to raise the rim as an added protection and to strike the coin in high relief. The inspiration was taken from coins found in Ancient Greece.

Months later, the models were being prepared, but some US Mint Officials were not so keen on redesigning the $20 Gold Coin. US Mint Chief Engraver Charles E. Barber was particularly opposed to the idea, stating the idea was impractical, but mainly because an outsider was hand-picked by the president to create the design instead of him. However, Roosevelt went on with his decision and officially appointed Saint-Gaudens to carry on.

The obverse features a full-length portrait of Lady Liberty wearing a gown in full stride. She was holding an olive branch on her left hand and a torch on her right hand. Rays of sunlight are seen behind her while the word LIBERTY is on top of her portrait in a form of an arc. The United States Capitol can be seen on her lower left and the date written in Roman Numerals MCMVII on her right, with Saint-Gaudens’ monogram just below the date. A total of 46 stars are scattered surrounding Miss Liberty.

For the reverse, an Eagle is seen midflight, with the rays of the sun below it extending up towards the Eagle. Two tiers are seen just above the Eagle – the inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA just above the denomination TWENTY DOLLARS. It lacks the motto IN GOD WE TRUST as President Roosevelt felt that money can easily be used in illegal and ungodly pursuits. However, the Congress passed an Act that mandated all US coins to include the motto IN GOD WE TRUST. The Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins were struck with the motto latter in 1908.

Saint-Gaudens was terminally ill during this time. He was diagnosed with cancer and his condition is slowly killing him. The good things were he was assisted by his trusted assistant, Henry Herning. The new $20 Gold Coins were eventually struck in high reliefs. Saint-Gaudens, unfortunately, died before the coin was even produced.

The US Mint still declined of the idea as the original design created by Saint-Gaudens needed more than 6 blows in order to create a single coin – some in wide rims and other with flat rims. After only 22 pieces of the new $20 Gold Coin were minted in Ultra-High Relief, the dies have already cracked because of the amount of pressure exerted on the coins. It was believed that two of these $20 Gold Coins were melted and the remaining were distributed. Although the original Ultra High-Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins were patterns, these were still considered as a regular coinage and is the most popular variety of the series.

The next $20 Gold was struck in modified, low-relief coins. Because of the strikingly beautiful appearance of the High-Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins, they became an instant hit and were worth $30.00 within weeks after these were issued and released. It has become one of the most desired coins among all US coins.

A total of 11,250 pieces of high-relief coins were struck before the modified version was released. The Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin, also known as Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle were struck from 1907-1916, then again in 1920-1932 in US Mints located in Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco. These were made up of 90% Gold, 10% Copper, weighs 33.40g, has a diameter of 34mm and have lettered edges.

Thanks to the many modifications made on the design of the Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin, 4 types of these Double Eagles were born.

The Four Types of Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin acc. To PCGS Coin Facts

  1.    Ultra-High Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin (1907)
    Coin: Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Image by Lost Dutchman Rare Coins, 1907 Saint-Gaudens double eagle high relief obverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

    Coin: Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Image by Lost Dutchman Rare Coins, 1907 Saint-Gaudens double eagle high relief reverse, size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 3.0 US

The very first and original models made by Augustus Saint-Gaudens were struck in Ultra-High Relief as a request by President Roosevelt. These were patters most sought-after by gold coin collectors.

Proofs:

1907 Extremely High Relief Lettered Edge – 22 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 EX-HR Plain Edge – 1 coin minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 EX-HR Inverted Edge Letters – 2 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  1.    Type 1 High Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin (1907)

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1907-G$20-Saint Gaudens (Roman, high relief), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The US Mint decided to strike the coins in a relief slight lower than the patterns as the dies literally cracked after just many coins were striked.

Regular Strike:

1907 High Relief-Wire Edge – 11,250 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 High Relief-Flat Edge – mintage n/a

  1.    Type 2 No Motto Arabic Numerals Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin (1907-1908)

The Type 1 High Relief proved to be impractical after mass production of the Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin ensued, so the US Mint striked the next issue with low relief. Arabic Numerals replaced the Roman Numeral during this time.

Regular Strikes:

1907 Saint – 361,667 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1908 No Motto – 4,271,551 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1908-D No Motto – 663,750 coins minted at the Denver Mint

Proofs:

1907 Saint Large Edge Letters – 3 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 Saint Small Edge Letters – 3 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  1.    Type 3 With Motto Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1908-D-G$20-Saint Gaudens (Arabic & motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

President Roosevelt was opposed to incorporating the motto IN GOD WE TRUST in the US Coinage with the belief that money can be used in illegal and ungodly practices, often reaching casinos and bars. However, the Congress passed a legislation that obliged the US Mint to include the motto in every coin. Thus, Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins struck in 1908 after the act was passed had the motto included in the decision. It was situated just below the Eagle.

Regular Strikes:

1908 Motto -156,258 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1908-D Motto -349,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1908-S -22,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1909 -161,215 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1909/8 -161,215 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1909-D -52,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1909-S -2,774,925 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1910 -482,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1910-D -429,000 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1910-S -2,128,250 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1911 -197,200 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1911-D -846,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1911-S -775,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1912 -149,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1913 -168,780 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1913-D -393,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1913-S -34,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1914 -95,250 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1914-D -453,000 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1914-S -1,498,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1915 -152,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1915-S -567,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1916-S -796,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1920 -228,250 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1920-S -558,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1921 -528,500 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1922 -1,375,500 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1922-S -2,658,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1923 -566,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1923-D -1,702,250 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1924 -4,323,500 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1924-D -3,049,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1924-S -2,927,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1925 -2,831,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1925-D -2,938,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1925-S -3,776,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1926 -816,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1926-D -481,000 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1926-S -2,041,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1927 -2,946,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1927-D -180,000 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1927-S -3,107,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1928 -8,816,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1929 -1,779,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1930-S -74,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1931 -2,938,250 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1931-D -106,500 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1932 -1,101,750 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1933 -445,500 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Proofs:

1908 Motto Matte – 101 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1908 Roman Finish – 1 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1909 – 57 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1910 – 167 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1911 -100 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1912 – 74 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1913 – 58 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1914 – 70 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1915 – 50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Collecting Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin

Always look for signs of wear on Miss Liberty’s chest, her knee as well as the Eagle’s wing. As one may have known by now, the most valuable Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin is one with the original design struck in Ultra High Relief.

Average coin collectors may find it very expensive to collect High-Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins. However, typeset Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins with and without Motto can be purchased at a modest price.

Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coin dated 1907 and 1933 are the most expensive ones to watch out for. The 1909/8 overdate is also a popular coin thanks to its error. Gold coin collectors, however, are still keen on collecting gold coins with low mintages like the 1913-S, 1914, 1915, 1930-S and 1931-D.

According to PCGS, Saint-Gaudens $20 Gold Coins can be purchased between $1,330.00-600,000.00 for Regular Strike coins. Proof coins would be much higher in price.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, Coin World, My Coin Guides

The Liberty Head $20 Gold Coin

The Liberty Head $20 Gold Coin or the Liberty Head Double Eagle Gold Coin is a beautiful coin that gives coin collectors the satisfaction when collecting the series. For one, being the first of its kind and the fact that it is made out of gold makes it valuable. As the largest circulation coin struck in gold in the US, almost all Liberty Head $20 Double Eagle is sought after among coin collectors regardless of their date and type.

After the discovery of Gold in January 1848 in California, thousands of people came to find their luck. Because of the spectacular amount of Gold found, the era of the California Gold Rush was born. Because of this, the Treasury Department of the United States made a decision to create gold coins. From Quarter Eagles ($2.50), Half Eagles ($5) and Eagles ($10). On March 3, 1849, another legislation was passed to create gold coins that are bigger in size than the previous issue. These were called the Double Eagle and has a denomination of $20.

The Liberty Head Double Eagle was struck from 1849-1907. It has three different types – three different reverses were made by US Mint Chief Engraver James Barton Longacre. The reason behind the many designs for the reverse of the Liberty Double Eagle was because of conspiracy.

The US Mint Director at that time, Robert Maskell Patterson wanted to replace Longacre with Charles Cushington Wright – a well-known medalist. Patterson teamed up with US Mint Chief Coiner Franklin Peale and went on harassing poor Longacre. He was forced to create three different designs for the obverse, and the three types of the Liberty Head Double Eagle was born.

The Three Varieties of Liberty Head $20 Gold Coin

  1.    Type 1 No Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1849-G$20-Liberty Head (Twenty D.), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

Designed by James B. Longacre, it was first struck in the year 1849. The Type 1 No Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle Coins were minted at the Philadelphia Mint from the year 1949-1865. At the San Francisco Mint, coins were minted from 1854 to 1866 while the New Orleans Mint produced Type 1 No Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle Coins from 1850 to 1861. Coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint bears no mintmark while those minted at San Francisco and New Orleans had the mintmark S and O respectively.

The coin is made up of 90% Gold, and 10% Copper. It has a reeded edge, weighs approximately 33.40g and has a diameter of 34mm. For the obverse, Longracre used a portrait similar to the gold dollar issued in 1849 to 1854. He created a portrait of Miss Liberty with half of her hair pulled up in a bun. She was wearing a coronet that has the word LIBERTY inscribed. 13 stars surround her portrait in a form of an arc while the date is seen below.

As for the reverse, an Eagle is featured on the center with a shield on its chest. It is clutching arrows and an olive branch using its talons. Stars and rays are seen above the Eagle while ornaments surrounds its sides. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA can be seen on top of the coin in a form of an arc while the denomination TWENTY D. is on the bottom. The mintmark is found just above the denomination.

The following are the Regular Strikes of the Type 1 No Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle:

1850 – 1,170,261 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1850-O -141,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1851 -2,087,155 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1851-O –315,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1852 -2,053,026 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1852-O -190,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1853 -1,261,326 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1853/’2′ Overdate -1,261,326 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1853-O -71,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1854 Small Date -757,899 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1854 Large Date -757,899 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1854-O -3,250 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1854-S -141,468 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1855 -364,666 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1855-O -8,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1855-S -879,675 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1856 -329,878 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1856-O -2,250 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1856-S -1,189,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1857 -439,375 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1857-O -30,000 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1857-S -970,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1858 -211,714 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1858-O – 35,250 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1858-S -846,710 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1859 -43,597 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1859-O -9,100 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1859-S -636,445 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1860 -577,670 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1860-O -6,600 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1860-S -544,950 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1861 -2,976,453 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1861 Paquet -2,976,453 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1861-O -17,741 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1861-S -748,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1861-S Paquet -19,250 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1862 -92,133 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1862-S -854,173 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1863 -142,790 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1863-S -966,570 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1864 -204,235 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1864-S -793,660 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1865 -351,175 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1865-S -1,042,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1866-S No Motto -12,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs:

1849 – n/a

1850 -3 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1854 -2 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1856 –n/a

1857 –n/a

1858 -5 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1859 -50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1860 -59 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1861 -66 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1862 -35 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1863 -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1864 -50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1865 -25 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

Special Strikes:

1854-S -1 coin minted at the San Francisco Mint

1856-O -2 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  1.    Type 2 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle with TWENTY D. on Reverse

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1866-G$20-Liberty Head (motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Type 2 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle was born after the Mint Act of 1865 was passed which included the provision where the motto IN GOD WE TRUST be included on the US coins. Longacre added the motto IN GOD WE TRUST in the reverse side of the coin and retained the denomination written as TWENTY D. The Type 2 Liberty Head Double Eagle was struck from the year 1866 up to 1876 in Philadelphia, San Francisco and Carson City.

Regular Strikes of the Type 2 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle with TWENTY D. on Reverse

1866 Motto -698,745 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1866-S Motto -830,250 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1867 -251,015 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1867-S -920,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1868 -98,575 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1868-S -837,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1869 -175,130 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1869-S -686,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1870 -155,150 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1870-CC -3,789 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1870-S -982,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1871 -80,120 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1871-CC -17,387 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1871-S -928,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1872 -251,850 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1872-CC -26,900 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1872-S -780,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1873 Closed 3 -1,709,800 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1873 Open 3 -1,709,800 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1873-CC -22,410 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1873-S Closed 3 -1,040,600 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1873-S Open 3 -1,040,600 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1874 -366,780 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1874-CC -115,085 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1874-S -1,214,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1875 -295,720 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1875-CC -111,151 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1875-S -1,230,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1876 -583,860 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1876-CC -138,441 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1876-S -1,597,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs

1866 Motto -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1867 -50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1868 -25 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1869 -25 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1870 -35 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1871 -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1872 -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1873 Closed 3 -25 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1874 -20 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1875 -20 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1876 -45 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

  1.    Type 3 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle with TWENTY DOLLARS on Reverse

    US Mint (coin), National Numismatic Collection (photograph by Jaclyn Nash), NNC-US-1877-G$20-Liberty Head (Twenty Dollars & motto), size by Bonnie Mattie, CC BY-SA 4.0

From 1877 to 1907, the motif of the reverse was once again changed and updated. It still has the same obverse like the two previous designs, and still has the motto IN GOD WE TRUST incorporated. However, for the Type 3, Miss Liberty’s head was tilted forward and the denomination was no longer as TWENTY D. but as TWENTY DOLLARS. These were minted in Philadelphia, San Francisco (mintmark S), New Orleans (mint mark O), Denver (mintmark D) and Carson City (mintmark CC).

Regular Strikes of the Type 3 With Motto Liberty Head Double Eagle with TWENTY DOLLARS on Reverse

1877 -397,650 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1877-CC -42,565 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1877-S -1,735,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1878 -543,625 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1878-CC -13,180 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1878-S -1,739,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1879 -207,600 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1879-CC -10,708 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1879-O -2,325 coins minted at the New Orleans Mint

1879-S -1,233,800 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1880 -51,420 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1880-S -836,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1881 -2,199 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1881-S -727,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1882 -571 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1882-CC -39,140 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1882-S -1,125,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1883-CC -59,962 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1883-S -1,189,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1884-CC -81,139 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1884-S -916,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1885 -751 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1885-CC -9,450 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1885-S -683,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1886 -1,000 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1887-S -283,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1888 -226,161 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1888-S -859,600 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1889 -44,070 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1889-CC -30,945 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1889-S -774,700 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1890 -75,940 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1890-CC -91,209 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1890-S -802,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1891 -1,390 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1891-CC -5,000 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1891-S -1,288,125 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1892 -4,430 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1892-CC -27,265 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1892-S -930,150 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1893 -344,280 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1893-CC -18,402 coins minted at the Carson City Mint

1893-S -996,175 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1894 -1,368,940 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1894-S -1,048,550 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1895 -1,114,605 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1895-S -1,143,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1896 -792,535 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1896-S -1,403,925 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1897 -1,383,175 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1897-S -1,470,250 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1898 -170,395 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1898-S -2,575,175 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1899 -1,669,300 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1899-S -2,010,300 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1900 -1,874,460 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1900-S -2,459,500 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1901 -111,430 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1901-S -1,596,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1902 -31,140 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1902-S -1,753,625 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1903 -287,270 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1903-S -954,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1904 -6,256,699 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1904-S -5,134,175 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1905 -58,910 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1905-S – 1,813,000 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1906 -69,596 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1906-D -620,250 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1906-S -2,065,750 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

1907 Liberty -1,451,786 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907-D -842,250 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1907-S -2,165,800 coins minted at the San Francisco Mint

Proofs:

1877 -20 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1878 -20 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1879 -30 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1880 -36 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1881 -51 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1882 -59 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1883 -92 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1884 -71 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1885 -77 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1886 -106 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1887 -121 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1888 -105 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1889 -41 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1890 -55 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1891 -52 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1892 -93 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1893 -59 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1894 -50 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1895 -51 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1896 -128 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1897 -86 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1898 -75 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1899 -84 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1900 -124 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1901 -96 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1902 -114 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1903 -158 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1904 -98 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1905 -92 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1906 -94 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907 Liberty -78 coins minted at the Philadelphia Mint

1907-D -1 coins minted at the Denver Mint

Special Strike:

1906-D Special Strike -12 coins minted at the Denver Mint

1907-D Special Strike -1 coins minted at the Denver Mint

Collecting Liberty Head Double Eagle

Liberty Head Double Eagles are usually collected as type coins. When grading one, always look for signs of wear. For Types 1, the wear tear is usually found on the Miss Liberty’s ear on the reverse and the Eagle’s head and neck in the reverse. Even in high grades, Type 1 Liberty Head Double Eagles are often seen with bag marks.

For Type 2 Liberty Head Double Eagles, focus on Miss Liberty’s eyebrow, her cheek and the hair above her ear and the Eagle’s neck, the tip of its wings and the top of the shield on its chest as these are the areas where tears are commonly found. The same goes for the Type 3 Liberty Head Double Eagles.

The most sought-after and highest priced Liberty Head Double Eagles are the 1849 Proof, 1854-O, 1855-S 1856-O, 1856-S, 1861, 1861-S, 1867, 1869, 1870-CC, 1871-CC, 1873 Open, 3, 1875-S 1879-O, 1879-CC, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886 and 1887. Prices for the Liberty Head Double Eagles range from $1,320.00-$500,000.00 for regular strikes and from $7,500.00-$20,000,000.00 for proofs.

References:

PCGS, PCGS CoinFacts, NGC Coin, Coins.com, Collectors Weekly